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Spying on Subconscious Feelings – Part 2

Jill Mattson | * Jill’s Wings of Light

subconscious mind

Personality programs identify our natural talents, strengthens and capabilities, encouraging us to better utilize them. Simultaneously personality profilers identify our weaknesses, allowing us to turn them into strengths.

Sages throughout history report how difficult it is to “know thyself,” but these wise sages did not have access to [Sharry]Edward’s multifaceted nanoVoice. Today we shall investigate its ability to reveal subconscious emotions.

Many of our behaviors and moods are hidden beneath layers of pain. We do not eliminate negative feelings by ignoring them. By identifying and addressing they are releases. We experience complex thoughts, feelings and behaviors, but are only fully conscious of one element at a time. We subjugate feelings and thoughts when we are occupied with other things. This underground emotional energy influences our health and creates emotional habits. Since our minds process only one action at a time, thoughts and feelings are regularly processed below our conscious mind. It is not only unpleasant feelings that we deny, but also deep levels of thinking and feeling that we experience all day long.

The nanoVoice graphs our emotions¨ whether or not we are conscious of them. Our feelings go underground far more than we suspect. Next week [, we will discuss] Ways we divert our feelings form our conscious mind.

*Published in its entirety with permission of he author

Robert O'Leary 150x150

Robert O’Leary, JD BARA, has had an abiding interest in alternative health products & modalities since the early 1970’s & he has seen how they have made people go from lacking health to vibrant health. He became an attorney, singer-songwriter, martial artist & father along the way and brings that experience to his practice as a BioAcoustic Soundhealth Practitioner, under the tutelage of the award-winning founder of BioAcoustic Biology, Sharry Edwards, whose Institute of BioAcoustic Biology has now been serving clients for 30 years with a non-invasive & safe integrative modality that supports the body’s ability to self-heal using the power of the human voice. Robert brings this modality to serve clients in Greater Springfield (MA), New England & “virtually” the world, with his website. He can also be reached at romayasoundhealthandbeauty@gmail.

 




New Cure for Alzheimer’s Disease? Non-Invasive High Frequency Sound Waves May Be Effective, Drug-Free Solution

Elderly 80 plus year old grandmother with granddaughter-compressed

By Mae Chan | Prevent Disease

The most effective treatment for Alzheimer’s Disease is gaining more notoriety and it’s drug-free. University of Queensland researchers have confirmed that non-invasive ultrasound technology breaks apart the neurotoxic amyloid plaques that result in memory loss and cognitive decline. The treatment is now being touted as the cure for the debilitating condition that accounts for 70 percent of all cases of dementia.

Alzheimer’s Disease (AD) is not genetic. Research is showing the incidence is more correlated to excitotoxins and heavy metals which play a critical role in the development of several neurological disorders, especially in North America.

Related Article: 5 Major Causes of Alzheimer’s (One of them is Contracted Through Food!)

In the last few decades, almost $40 billion has been spent worldwide on trying to develop a breakthrough drug treatment for Alzheimer’s, yet no pharmaceutical approach has worked. We could not produce anything that could slow it down, let alone stop the disease, until now where new research into sound waves is being praised as a possible cure.

AD is a neurodegenerative disorder characterized by progressive cognitive impairment. Although the exact cause of AD remains to be elucidated, we know that its development is associated with brain shrinkage and the formation of characteristic plaques in certain areas. These consist of dead cells and a protein known as amyloid-beta (A-Beta), which aggregates into abnormal fibers that accumulate as toxic clumps outside of cells.

Sounds Waves Not Drugs

Much research into AD has focused on preventing the buildup of these aggregates or clearing them from the brain, but scientists are faced with a problem: The brain is shielded by a delicate layer of cells, known as the blood-brain barrier (BBB), which is very difficult for things to cross, such as therapeutics or helpful antibodies.

Amyloid plaques sit between the neurons and end up as dense clusters of beta-amyloid molecules, a sticky type of protein that clumps together and forms plaques.

Australian researchers have come up with a non-invasive ultrasound technology that clears the brain of neurotoxic amyloid plaques – structures that are responsible for memory loss and a decline in cognitive function in Alzheimer’s patients.

Publishing in Science Translational Medicine, the team described the technique as using a particular type of ultrasound called a focused therapeutic ultrasound, which non-invasively beams sound waves into the brain tissue. By oscillating super-fast, these sound waves are able to gently open up the blood-brain barrier, which is a layer that protects the brain against bacteria, and stimulate the brain’s microglial cells to activate. Microglila cells are basically waste-removal cells, so they’re able to clear out the toxic beta-amyloid clumps that are responsible for the worst symptoms of Alzheimer’s.

Related Article: Scientists Are Able to Eliminate Alzheimer’s Brain Plaque With Ultrasound Waves

The team reports fully restoring the memory function of 75 percent of the mice they tested it on, with zero damage to the surrounding brain tissue. They found that the treated mice displayed improved performance in three memory tasks – a maze, a test to get them to recognize new objects, and one to get them to remember the places they should avoid.

“We’re extremely excited by this innovation of treating Alzheimer’s without using drug therapeutics,” said team member Jurgen Gotz. “The word ‘breakthrough’ is often misused, but in this case I think this really does fundamentally change our understanding of how to treat this disease, and I foresee a great future for this approach.”

At UQ’s Queensland Brain Institute, Queensland Premier Annastacia Palaszczuk said the findings could have a wide impact for the community.

“The Government’s $9 million investment into this technology was to drive discoveries into clinics, and today’s announcement indicates that together with the Queensland Brain Institute, it was a worthwhile investment,” Ms Palaszczuk said.

“We’re also working on seeing whether this method clears toxic protein aggregates in neurodegenerative diseases other than Alzheimer’s and whether this also restores executive functions, including decision-making and motor control.”

Of the 5.4 million Americans with Alzheimer’s, an estimated 5.2 million people are age 65 and older, and approximately 200,000 individuals are under age 65 (younger-onset Alzheimer’s).

Sources:
sciencemag.org
uq.edu.au
sciencealert.com

Read more great articles at Prevent Disease.




Gum Disease Opens Up the Body to a Host of Infections

By Laura Biel | Science News

GirlBrushingTeeth-680x380

For centuries, the mouth and the body have been disconnected — at least when it comes to health care. Through the Middle Ages and beyond, teeth fell under the care of barbers, who could shave a customer and pull a molar with equal skill. In the 1700s, French surgeon Pierre Fauchard published the Treatise on Teeth, establishing dentistry as its own science.

Across the channel in England, as physicians gained stature in the 19th century, surgeons and dentists engaged in a power struggle. In the modern United States, after medicine became linked to employer insurance and Medicare, the fissure between medicine and dentistry widened. Insurance coverage began at the throat.

So when Salomon Amar, a periodontal specialist at Boston University, began exploring links between oral bacteria and heart disease in animal studies in the late 1990s, reactions were lukewarm. “Many cardiologists thought we were a bit crazy,” he says. Skepticism still abounds, but the same molecular tools that have dramatically changed understanding of the gut microbiome are now allowing scientists to track and examine bacteria in the mouth. Advocates of a connection between the artery disease atherosclerosis and microbes are hoping to find convincing proof of their suspicions, while exploring links between ailing gums and other conditions, including cancer, arthritis, diabetes and even Alzheimer’s disease.

The work has profound implications for public health, given that more than 65 million American adults are thought to have periodontal disease, which occurs when bacterial overgrowth inflames the gums and can lead to erosion of gums and bone. If it turns out that periodontal decay drives other diseases, doctors would have a new, and relatively simple, means of prevention.

Wenche Borgnakke, a dental researcher at the University of Michigan in Ann Arbor, has been making this case for years, citing “solid evidence that periodontal treatment has an effect on systemic disease.” Shepoints to a study published last year in the journal Medicine comparing patients on dialysis who received periodontal treatment with those who did not. Those getting treatment had an almost 30 percent lower risk of pneumonia and hospitalization from infections. Another study published earlier this year found that gum disease is associated with a roughly 10 percent higher mortality over 10 years among patients with kidney problems.

Foul mouth

To date, more than 500 scientific papers have weighed in on the connection between atherosclerosis and gum disease. Officially, the theory remains “biologically plausible,” but unproven, according to the American Heart Association’s formal position. Some concepts are undisputed: For one, the microbes that live in the mouth don’t stay in the mouth. The simple act of brushing allows bacteria clinging to the teeth and gums to leak into the bloodstream.

As the posters at the dentist’s office attest, neglected oral hygiene encourages bacterial growth, allowing the microbes to breed on and between teeth, as well as under the gums. What the illustrations don’t show is that these microorganisms form a biofilm, a tough microbial community bound together with sugar molecules in a thin coating. This is the plaque your dentist warns you about.

“If you do not brush your teeth, it will sit there and accumulate. As that plaque gets thicker and thicker, there is less and less oxygen in the deepest layers,” Borgnakke says. Safely sheltered, the innermost plaque starts to favor anaerobic bacteria, which, when they escape into the blood, can survive in the oxygen-starved nooks and crannies deep inside the body.

As plaque builds up, gums get irritated, swell and draw more blood into the distressed tissue. Eventually, chemicals produced by the biofilm break down the thin layer of cells that form a boundary between the gums and the blood vessels. Periodontitis officially occurs when gum and bone tissue starts to deteriorate. The space between the tooth and gums forms a pocket; dentists measure the depth of the pockets to determine the severity of infection. “We usually think of an infection as some bug from the outside that attacks the body,” says Borgnakke. “In this case, it’s an internal infection.”

It was once thought that only a handful of microbial species were involved in the development of periodontitis, but the latest studies have revealed that many of the microbes responsible for gum disease come from “previously underappreciated species,” according to a 2015 report in Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology. Because many bacteria resist growth in a laboratory, only a small portion of some 500 to 700 species of oral microbes have been well characterized.

One aggressive pathogen, an organism called Porphyromonas gingivalis, has antennae that stick out and can pry open the space between two cells, Borgnakke says. “This is a really, really nasty bug.” Within minutes of invading blood vessels, P. gingivalis and its gang of accomplices are ferried to distant sites, where they can set up outposts. “Bacteria that normally live in the mouth are found in every organ in the body, and even muscle cells,” she says.

The body doesn’t take this assault lying down. The immune system gets agitated and tends to stay in a state of slow simmer. But the bacteria that cause periodontal disease have a knack for turning the body’s defense on its head, according to a 2015 review in Nature Reviews Immunology. Case in point: Common white blood cells called neutrophils are deployed to the failing gums — where they not only fail to control the infection, but also end up releasing enzymes that further destroy tissue. The immune system also releases an avalanche of chemicals designed to help control the infection. For example, the liver starts producing C-reactive protein, a molecule that has such an important role in signaling the rise of heart disease that it is considered a risk factor by some researchers.

[Read more here]

Robert O'Leary 150x150Robert O’Leary, JD BARA, has had an abiding interest in alternative health products and modalities since the early 1970’s, and he has seen how they have made people go from lacking health to vibrant health. He became an attorney, singer-songwriter, martial artist and father along the way and brings that experience to his practice as a BioAcoustic Soundhealth Practitioner, under the tutelage of the award-winning founder of BioAcoustic Biology, Sharry Edwards, whose Institute of BioAcoustic Biology has now been serving clients for 30 years with a non-invasive and safe integrative modality that supports the body’s ability to self-heal using the power of the human voice. Robert brings this modality to serve clients in Greater Springfield (MA), New England and “virtually” the world, through his new website, www.romayasoundhealthandbeauty.com. He can also be reached at romayasoundhealthandbeauty@gmail.com




The Future Of Medicine Could Be Found In This Tiny Crystal Ball

Drexel University researchers have developed a way to grow crystals in a sphere shape. A development that could lead to its use as a new drug delivery platform.

Drexel University researchers have developed a way to grow crystals in a sphere shape. A development that could lead to its use as a new drug delivery platform.

Source: Science Daily

A Drexel University materials scientist has discovered a way to grow a crystal ball in a lab. Not the kind that soothsayers use to predict the future, but a microscopic version that could be used to encapsulate medication in a way that would allow it to deliver its curative payload more effectively inside the body.

Christopher Li, PhD, a professor in the College of Engineering and head of the Soft Materials Lab in the Department of Materials Science & Engineering, recently reported his finding in Nature Communications. It’s a significant one, because up until now, crystals have grown in rigid, structured formations. One of the forms we’re most familiar with is the snowflake, with a web of straight lines connecting to making a grid that grows into the crystalline flake.

Crystals form this way because their molecules are predisposed to align themselves in a way that links them via the strongest electrochemical bond available. If molecules are floating freely, as they are in a water vapor for example, they are able to follow this default course to connect with other molecules and, eventually, form a crystal — an ice crystal, or snowflake, in the case of water molecules.

But, as the adage holds: no two snowflakes are alike. This is because the formation of a crystal can be affected by the environment in which it forms. Li uses this molecular property to engineer his hollow crystal spheres.

His “crystalsomes” are named for their similarity to liposomes — tiny bubbles with the same membrane as cells that are being explored for use as biological packages for delivering drug treatments. But Li and his team estimate that their crystalsomes could actually be better at making the delivery than their namesake, because crystals hold up a bit better than liposomes both on the way into and within the body.

“Mechanical properties of polymeric materials could be improved by forming crystalline structures,” Li said. “While precisely tuning crystallization within a nanoscale curved space is challenging, we envisage that this novel structure could shed light on investigating spherical crystallography and drug delivery.”

Li was able to overcome crystal’s edge-forming tendencies by containing it inside a droplet. A rough equivalent of this would be forcing a single snowflake to form inside a tiny snow globe, rather than in the open expanse of the atmosphere.

READ THE REST OF THIS ARTICLE…




“Flying Vaccination” against ZIKA from GE Mosquitos?

gm mosquito

By Jon Rappoport | NoMoreFakeNews

Zika: could GE mosquitoes bite, deliver flying vaccine?

Zika: could be the ideal fake epidemic to stir “need” for airborne vaccination: “we must do something to stop the spread of the virus”   No need to mandate shots: release mosquitoes to deliver them.

People are discussing whether genetically engineered mosquitoes could have spread Zika, the virus that causes nothing.

Rather, look to the future, when such biting mosquitoes could deliver flying vaccinations against the virus that causes nothing.

Related Article:Robo Bees and the Synthetic Reality Agenda

In previous articles, I’ve established that the connection between the Zika virus and cases of birth defects in Brazil is entirely and utterly unproven. It is hype, not science.

But that isn’t stopping the World Health Organization, the biggest medical propaganda agency in the world, from promoting Zika hysteria to the moon.

In the wake of this madness…

Here are a few hints and clues about a possible flying mosquito vaccinator:

sciencemag.org, 3/18/2010, “Researchers Turn Mosquitoes Into Flying Vaccinators”:

“…A group of Japanese researchers has developed a mosquito that spreads vaccine instead of disease. Even the researchers admit, however, that regulatory and ethical problems will prevent the critters from ever taking wing—at least for the delivery of human vaccines. …No regulatory agency would sign off on that, says molecular biologist Robert Sinden of Imperial College London. Releasing the mosquitoes would also mean vaccinating people without their informed consent, an ethical no-no. Yoshida concedes that the mosquito would be ‘unacceptable’ as a human vaccine-delivery mechanism.”

However, in the midst of forced hysteria about Zika, or the next virus, or the one after that—each said to be on the verge of causing a global holocaust—the so-called ethical considerations could go out the window. What degree of ethics was involved, in the 1990s, when GMO crops were allowed to be planted, without human safety studies, without any oversight?

If not mosquitoes as the vaccine-delivery system, how about parasites?

Science Daily, 9/11/2013, “Mosquito bites deliver potential new malaria vaccine”:

“’In this paper we show that genetically engineered parasites are a promising, viable option for developing a malaria vaccine, and we are currently engineering the next generation of attenuated parasite strains with the aim to enter clinical studies soon.’ …For the first time, researchers created a weakened version of the human malaria parasite by altering its DNA. They tested the safety of the new modified parasite by injecting six human volunteers through mosquito bites. Five of the six volunteers showed no infection with the parasite, suggesting that the new genetic technique has potential as the basis for a malaria vaccine.”

As they say, what could possibly go wrong?

And now, here is a peek into where Japanese researchers pioneering mosquito-vaccinators obtained their funding.

From AFP, 10/24/2008:

“The Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation awarded 100,000 dollars each on Wednesday to scientists in 22 countries including funding for a Japanese proposal to turn mosquitoes into ‘flying syringes’ delivering vaccines… Among the proposals receiving funding was one from Hiroyuki Matsuoka at Jichi Medical University in Japan. ‘(Matsuoka) thinks it may be possible to turn mosquitoes that normally transmit disease into “flying syringes,” so that when they bite humans they deliver vaccines,’ the Gates Foundation said.”

Who wouldn’t feel comfortable about Bill Gates spearheading this program? Answer: any human with a few operating brain cells.

As technically difficult as the program may be—and as fraught with “ethical considerations”—don’t underestimate the madness of the perpetrators.

A year from now, five years from now, you might read this sort of declaration from the World Health Organization:

“People remember the Zika virus and the threat it posed to our human future, before the heroic efforts of researchers and public-health officials managed to get it under control. And now with the new SanDab-3 virus spreading and spiraling out of control, we are poised to permit the release of 32 million mosquitoes who have been altered so they can deliver a SanDab vaccine to millions of endangered people all over the planet. It is our best option at this time, during the crisis…”

Related Article:How Your Natural Intuition Can Protect You From Disaster

Phony “epidemics” (e.g., SARSSwine FluWest NileEbolaZika) haven’t stopped the march of science. The march of science-propaganda invented these scare-constructs in the first place. It stands to reason that back-end payoffs are the theme of such campaigns.

Related Article: Zika Hoax: Five Things That Will Happen Next

One of the prime payoffs is new vaccines. And if a delivery system (biting insects) can be created beyond the possibility of recall, so much the better.

Related Article: New Study: Bee Venom Found to Destroy HIV (Human Immunodeficiency Virus)

All it takes is a high enough degree of engendered public fear.

That’s what the “epidemics” are: contagions of fear.

READ THE ORIGINAL ARTICLE HERE AND MORE FROM JON RAPPOPORT……




DARPA Program To Connect Brains To Computers With Implantable Chip

digital brainGCN

By Nicholas West |Activist Post

For additional background to the latest press release from DARPA posted in full below, I encourage you to read the following selection of linked articles where I discuss the scope and chronology of what is being studied. Therein, you will find that the U.S. BRAIN Initiative and its European counterpart, the Human Brain Project, are not spending multi-billions of dollars on neuroscience research simply to help people with Post Traumatic Stress Disorder and organic brain dysfunction. It is, perhaps first and foremost, a military endeavor that has wide ramifications if even 1/10th of what is being studied comes to fruition. In short, it’s more about mind control than it is about brain restoration and improvement. Please keep this in mind when you read DARPA’s emphasis on “new therapies.”

 Related Article:Doctor Had Computer Chips Implanted in His Own Brain to Further His Research

DARPA Press Release

Related Article: DARPA Takes Step Closer to the Dark Side with Death Ray Field Test

A new DARPA program aims to develop an implantable neural interface able to provide unprecedented signal resolution and data-transfer bandwidth between the human brain and the digital world. The interface would serve as a translator, converting between the electrochemical language used by neurons in the brain and the ones and zeros that constitute the language of information technology. The goal is to achieve this communications link in a biocompatible device no larger than one cubic centimeter in size, roughly the volume of two nickels stacked back to back.

The program, Neural Engineering System Design (NESD), stands to dramatically enhance research capabilities in neurotechnology and provide a foundation for new therapies.

“Today’s best brain-computer interface systems are like two supercomputers trying to talk to each other using an old 300-baud modem,” said Phillip Alvelda, the NESD program manager. “Imagine what will become possible when we upgrade our tools to really open the channel between the human brain and modern electronics.”

Among the program’s potential applications are devices that could compensate for deficits in sight or hearing by feeding digital auditory or visual information into the brain at a resolution and experiential quality far higher than is possible with current technology.

Neural interfaces currently approved for human use squeeze a tremendous amount of information through just 100 channels, with each channel aggregating signals from tens of thousands of neurons at a time. The result is noisy and imprecise. In contrast, the NESD program aims to develop systems that can communicate clearly and individually with any of up to one million neurons in a given region of the brain.

Related Article: Jon Rappoport: This Is Your Brain On Neuroscience

Achieving the program’s ambitious goals and ensuring that the envisioned devices will have the potential to be practical outside of a research setting will require integrated breakthroughs across numerous disciplines including neuroscience, synthetic biology, low-power electronics, photonics, medical device packaging and manufacturing, systems engineering, and clinical testing. In addition to the program’s hardware challenges, NESD researchers will be required to develop advanced mathematical and neuro-computation techniques to first transcode high-definition sensory information between electronic and cortical neuron representations and then compress and represent those data with minimal loss of fidelity and functionality.

To accelerate that integrative process, the NESD program aims to recruit a diverse roster of leading industry stakeholders willing to offer state-of-the-art prototyping and manufacturing services and intellectual property to NESD researchers on a pre-competitive basis. In later phases of the program, these partners could help transition the resulting technologies into research and commercial application spaces.

To familiarize potential participants with the technical objectives of NESD, DARPA will host a Proposers Day meeting that runs Tuesday and Wednesday, February 2-3, 2016, in Arlington, Va. The Special Notice announcing the Proposers Day meeting is available at

“Today’s best brain-computer interface systems are like two supercomputers trying to talk to each other using an old 300-baud modem,” said Phillip Alvelda, the NESD program manager. “Imagine what will become possible when we upgrade our tools to really open the channel between the human brain and modern electronics.”

Among the program’s potential applications are devices that could compensate for deficits in sight or hearing by feeding digital auditory or visual information into the brain at a resolution and experiential quality far higher than is possible with current technology.

Neural interfaces currently approved for human use squeeze a tremendous amount of information through just 100 channels, with each channel aggregating signals from tens of thousands of neurons at a time. The result is noisy and imprecise. In contrast, the NESD program aims to develop systems that can communicate clearly and individually with any of up to one million neurons in a given region of the brain.

Related Article: Secret DARPA Mind Control Project Revealed: Leaked Document

Achieving the program’s ambitious goals and ensuring that the envisioned devices will have the potential to be practical outside of a research setting will require integrated breakthroughs across numerous disciplines including neuroscience, synthetic biology, low-power electronics, photonics, medical device packaging and manufacturing, systems engineering, and clinical testing. In addition to the program’s hardware challenges, NESD researchers will be required to develop advanced mathematical and neuro-computation techniques to first transcode high-definition sensory information between electronic and cortical neuron representations and then compress and represent those data with minimal loss of fidelity and functionality.

To accelerate that integrative process, the NESD program aims to recruit a diverse roster of leading industry stakeholders willing to offer state-of-the-art prototyping and manufacturing services and intellectual property to NESD researchers on a pre-competitive basis. In later phases of the program, these partners could help transition the resulting technologies into research and commercial application spaces.

To familiarize potential participants with the technical objectives of NESD, DARPA will host a Proposers Day meeting that runs Tuesday and Wednesday, February 2-3, 2016, in Arlington, Va. The Special Notice announcing the Proposers Day meeting is available at…

Read the rest of the article here…..

 




The New Toothpaste That Could Leave Dentists Without Work

Japanese-kamagishi-toothpaste-compressed

Source: World Truth 

A revolutionary invention for maintaining personal hygiene has been invented by a Japanese researcher Kazue Yamagishi. It’s about a new toothpaste that fills all the holes and cracks in the teeth and restore the tooth enamel.

All this ultimately makes a lot of manipulations unnecessary , which dentists usually perform.

In its composition the tooth paste of the Japanese researcher is similar with the tooth enamel, the only difference is that it is  liquid. Thus it can easily be applied to the affected area with a toothbrush.

READ THE REST OF THIS ARTICLE…

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Doctor Had Computer Chips Implanted in His Own Brain to Further His Research

dr brain chips

By Adam Piore | Technology Review

Phil Kennedy no longer saw any other way to get the data. That was how one day he came to lie blissfully unconscious on an operating table in Belize while a neurosurgeon sawed off the top of his skull.

Last year, Kennedy, a 67-year-old neurologist and inventor, did something unprecedented in the annals of self-experimentation. He paid a surgeon in Central America $25,000 to implant electrodes into his brain in order to establish a connection between his motor cortex and a computer.

Related Article: Team Links Two Human Brains Via Internet For Q&A Experiment

Along with a small group of pioneers, Kennedy had in the late 1980s developed “invasive” human brain-computer interfaces—literally wires inside the brain attached to a computer, and he is widely credited as the first to allow a severely paralyzed “locked-in” patient to move a computer cursor using her brain. “The father of cyborgs,” one magazine called him.

Kennedy’s scientific aim has been to build a speech decoder—software that can translate the neuronal signals produced by imagined speech into words coming out of a speech synthesizer. But this work, carried out by his small Georgia company Neural Signals, had stalled, Kennedy says. He could no longer find research subjects, had little funding, and had lost the support of the U.S. Food and Drug Administration.

That is why in June 2014, he found himself sitting in a distant hospital contemplating the image of his own shaved scalp in a mirror. “This whole research effort of 29 years so far was going to die if I didn’t do something,” he says. “I didn’t want it to die on the vine. That is why I took the risk.”

This fall, Kennedy presented studies of his own brain at the Society for Neuroscience in Chicago, where his actions provoked both awe and concern among colleagues. By arranging for surgery on a healthy person—even himself, even in the name of science—he’d likely violated his doctor’s oath. “I’m glad he’s fine now,” says Eddie Chang, a University of California, San Francisco, neurosurgeon whose recent work mapping the areas of the motor cortex that control speech helped guide Kennedy’s calculations. “I hope he gets some precious, precious data.”

Related Article: Jon Rappoport: This Is Your Brain On Neuroscience

FDA trouble

Kennedy, who was born in Ireland, says his self-experiment was driven by frustration and by scientific questions. He was so intrigued by the brain as a young physician that he returned to school to earn a Ph.D. in neuroscience. While running a lab at the Georgia Institute of Technology in the 1980s, he developed and patented an innovative type of electrode consisting of a pair of gold wires encased in a tiny glass cone. Filled with a proprietary blend of growth factors, the electrode induced nearby neurons to grow into the device.

In 1996, after tests in animals, the FDA agreed to allow Kennedy to implant his electrodes into locked-in patients with paralysis so severe they could no longer speak or move. His first volunteer was a special education teacher and mother of two named Marjory, or “MH,” who agreed to undergo the procedure at the very end of her life. Marjory had ALS but demonstrated she could turn a switch on and off just by thinking. But she was so sick that only 76 days later, she died. Next, in 1998, came Johnny Ray, a 53-year-old Vietnam veteran and drywall contractor who awoke from a coma with his mind fully intact but unable to move anything except his eyelids.

Kennedy personally oversaw the implantation of the electrodes in at least five subjects, and his team began showing that if it recorded from just a few neurons, patients could move a cursor on a computer screen and communicate by picking words or letters from a menu.

By 2004, Kennedy had implanted his electrodes in the brain of Erik Ramsey, a volunteer who suffered a catastrophic brain stem stroke in a car accident that left him locked in at the age of 16. Thanks to the data collected from Ramsey, Kennedy and his collaborators continued to publish high-profile papers on the results in journals like PLOS One and Frontiers in Neuroscience as recently as 2009 and 2011. One paper described how software could pick out the sounds Ramsey was imagining and allow him to very roughly pronounce a few simple words. Eventually, Ramsey became too ill to keep participating in the research.

By then, the FDA had also withdrawn permission to use the devices in any more patients. Kennedy says the agency began asking him for more safety data, including on the neurotrophic factors he was using to induce neuronal growth. When Kennedy couldn’t provide the data, the FDA refused to approve any more implants.

Kennedy never fully accepted the FDA decision (he took at least one other patient to Belize for an implant). There were also scientific frustrations working with disabled people. Locked-in people can’t communicate, except at times with grunts or their eyes, something that added a confounding variable to his experiments. When a given neuron fired off, he could never be sure what the patient had been thinking.

Related Article: How Your Thoughts Can Change the Structure And Function Of Your Brain

Kennedy became convinced that the way to take his research to the next level was to find a volunteer who could still speak. For almost a year he searched for a volunteer with ALS who still retained some vocal abilities, hoping to take the patient offshore for surgery. “I couldn’t get one. So after much thinking and pondering I decided to do it on myself,” he says. “I tried to talk myself out of it for years.”

The surgery took place in June 2014 at a 13-bed Belize City hospital a thousand miles south of his Georgia-based neurology practice and also far from the reach of the FDA. Prior to boarding his flight, Kennedy did all he could to prepare. At his small company, Neural Signals, he fabricated the electrodes the neurosurgeon would implant into his motor cortex—even chose the spot where he wanted them buried. He put aside enough money to support himself for a few months if the surgery went wrong. He had made sure his living will was in order and that his older son knew where he was.

READ THE REST OF THIS ARTICLE…




Major Medical Advance: Working Vocal Cords Grown in a Lab Out of Human Cells

By Ian Sample | The Guardian

Vocal cords that produce realistic sounds have been grown in the lab from human cells.

The work marks a first step towards better treatments for patients who lose their voices to injury or disease.

Vocal cords are formed by two bands of smooth muscle tissue that are lined with a material called mucosa. When air passes through them, the folds vibrate hundreds of times per second to make sounds.

But diseases such as cancer can destroy the delicate folds and for many patients, the medical treatments are limited. Some patients with damaged vocal cords have viscous materials injected to make the folds more pliable. Others improve with voice coaching.

Researchers in the US took a different approach and grew layers of vocal cord cells onto scaffolds that produced tough elastic tissue similar to those within the natural voice box. When doctors tested the lab-grown tissue in voice boxes taken from dead dogs, they found they produced the same sounds as the natural tissue.

“Voice is a pretty amazing thing, yet we don’t give it much thought until something goes wrong,” said lead researcher Nathan Welham at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. “The ability to vibrate and make sounds is pretty remarkable and unique to this part of the body.”

“When the tissue is damaged it doesn’t recover and regenerate normally and we don’t have great solutions at present to deal with that,” Welham added. “It’s an exquisite system and a hard thing to replicate.”

Working with doctors in Japan, the US team grew tissue from healthy connective tissue and lining cells taken from the vocal cords of four patients whose voice boxes had been removed for medical reasons, and one dead human donor.

After two weeks in the lab, the two cell types began to assemble into layers that resembled the structure of healthy vocal cords. Details of the research are reported in the journal Science Translational Medicine.

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Firefighter Makes Medical History Receiving Most Extensive Facial Transplant To Date

firefighter-compressed

By Sara G. Miller | Live Science

A 41-year-old man who suffered extensive facial burns in 2001 while working as a volunteer firefighter now has a new face. The man recently underwent the most extensive facial transplant done to date, said the doctors who treated him.

Surgeons at New York University Langone Medical Center operated for 26 hours in August 2015. The team included over 100 individuals, said Dr. Robert Grossman, the dean and CEO of the medical center, speaking at press conference today (Nov. 16).

This surgery is historic, said Dr. Eduardo Rodriguez, a plastic surgeon at the center, who led the operation.  [The 9 Most Interesting Transplants]

“The amount of tissue that was transplanted [in this surgery] had not been transplanted before,” Rodriguez said. He noted that he had only performed one facial transplant procedure prior to this surgery (that earlier operation was the first to successfully transplant bone and teeth).

Prior to this surgery, Rodriguez told the patient, Patrick Hardison, that the surgery had a 50/50 chance of success, Rodriguez said.

After his accident, Hardison had no normal tissue in his face, scalp, eyelids, nose or lips, Rodriguez said. Hardison had also lost his ears, the doctor said. Hardison wore a baseball cap, sunglasses and prosthetic ears to conceal his appearance, and because of significant scarring on his face, he experienced enormous pain when making facial expressions and chewing.

The surgeons planned out the extensive surgery down to the minute, Rodriguez said.

READ THE REST OF THIS ARTICLE…

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Lost a Tooth? Print a New One! New 3D Teeth Kill Bacteria On Contact

3D printed tooth

By Trevor Hewitt | Plaid Zebra

Lost a tooth? No problem, just print another. A strange notion, but one that Dutch researchers are trying to make a reality with 3D-printed teeth made from antimicrobial plastic.

Scientists in the Netherlands developed the material by adding antimicrobial salts to existing dental resin (the stuff that dentists use to fill your cavities). The resulting mix is hardened with ultraviolet light and used to print artificial teeth.

When the material was tested by exposing it to human saliva and Streptococcus mutans, the bacterium that causes tooth decay, it killed over 99 per cent of all bacteria. “[It kills] bacteria on contact, but on the other hand it’s not harmful to human cells,” said Andreas Herrmann, a chemist involved in developing the material.




Probiotic Treatment Cures Peanut Allergy in Children

 | Gizmag.com

Last year, scientists from the University of Chicago found that a probiotic therapy using a common gut bacteria prevented sensitization to peanut allergens – in mice. Now researchers at the Murdoch Childrens Research Institute in Melbourne, Australia, have shown that a similar probiotic treatment, this time involving Lactobacillus rhamnosus, has a similar effect, but this time in children.

Children with allergies present a huge challenge for parents and carers, with youngsters having a propensity to stick just about anything in their mouths and swapping lunches in the schoolyard having potentially fatal consequences. With Australia and New Zealand boasting the dubious honor of having among the highest prevalence of allergic disorders in the developed world, Professor Mimi Tang and her team had plenty of potential subjects to choose from for their research into a potential treatment.

Their 18-month study saw over 60 children with peanut allergies orally given either a placebo, or a dose of Lactobacillus rhamnosus, a bacteria that is sometimes used in yogurt and dairy products, along with a peanut protein. While the probiotic was given in a fixed daily dose, the amount of peanut protein started out very low and was gradually stepped up every two weeks until the maintenance dose of 2 g was reached…

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10 Mind Blowing Science Ideas that Will Change the World (Video)

Video Source: Infinite Waters (Diving Deep)

In this video, Ralph Smart of Infinite Waters Diving Deep shares 10 amazing scientific ideas that he thinks will change the world. Here they are:

  1. Free internet service from 4000 satellites by 2020
  2. A hydrogen-powered car with zero emissions
  3. Floating, solar-powered farms by 2050
  4. Augmented reality surgery
  5. Viagra for women
  6. The blackest paint ever for concentrated solar power
  7. Vantar black the worlds darkest material that captures up to 99% of light
  8. Computers that see your pain by interpreting facial expressions
  9. Hyper-loop trains that allow for speeds up to 760 miles per hour
  10. Computers made of water

If you have one (or more) you want to add, feel free to share in the comments section below.




50 Cent Paper Microscope Could Revolutionize Medicine

By Emmie Martin | Business Insider Australia

Microscope-19113363_m-680x380-Modified

For a whole lot of people, especially those in developing countries, science — and with it, medicine — isn’t readily available to the majority of citizens. But Manu Prakash wants to change that.

Prakash, an assistant professor of bioengineering at Stanford, is the proprietor of “frugal science,” a term he coined to explain the movement toward building cheap versions of high tech tools. His endeavour aims to make medical devices both affordable and available to the masses.

The way Prakash sees it, labs don’t need the most expensive equipment out there in order to reach profound breakthroughs. “Today people look at these extraordinary labs and forget that in the 1800s they could still do the exact same science,” he told The New York Times.

So in 2014 he created a paper microscope, aptly named the Foldscope, that costs only 50 cents to produce.

Though microscopes might seem like a mundane piece of equipment, they remain an integral part of detecting disease and analysing blood samples. Yet despite their necessity, they’re expensive. A quality microscope can cost hundreds of dollars, plus even more to keep it maintained.

For labs in developing countries, these costs often lie outside their meager budgets. Even for labs that can afford the luxury of a high-powered microscope, properly trained technicians come at a steep price as well.

Prakash’s Foldscope is made almost entirely of paper. It’s colour-coded and perforated to guide users in construction, but features no written instructions, making it universally understandable. All of the microscope’s non-paper parts, such as its lens and battery, are built in to the sheet, keeping assembly as simple as possible.

The higher resolution version of the microscope magnifies up to 2,100 times and costs around $US1, while the lower resolution costs around 50 cents. The entire microscope is small enough to fit in a pocket, nearly weightless, and incredibly sturdy — it can be dropped, stomped on, or doused in water and will still work.

Practically, the Foldscope can help doctors correctly diagnose deadly diseases such as malaria, schistosomiasis, and African sleeping sickness. In a TED Talk, Prakash explains that identifying these infections is as simple as adding dye to a single drop of blood. With cheap, easy-to-use microscopes, any lab technician can learn to detect malaria, potentially revolutionising healthcare in areas where these diseases run rampant.

While the generic Foldscope serves as a one-size-fits-all microscope, Prakash and his team have also developed specialised versions, such as a malaria-centric one, that make identifying diseases even easier.

[Read more here]

Originally entitled: “A paper microscope that costs only 50 cents can detect malaria from just a drop of blood — and it could revolutionise medicine”

Robert O'Leary 150x150Robert O’Leary, JD BARA, has had an abiding interest in alternative health products & modalities since the early 1970’s & he has seen how they have made people go from lacking health to vibrant health. He became an attorney, singer-songwriter, martial artist & father along the way and brings that experience to his practice as a BioAcoustic Soundhealth Practitioner, under the tutelage of the award-winning founder of BioAcoustic Biology, Sharry Edwards, whose Institute of BioAcoustic Biology has now been serving clients for 30 years with a non-invasive & safe integrative modality that supports the body’s ability to self-heal using the power of the human voice. Robert brings this modality to serve clients in Greater Springfield (MA), New England & “virtually” the world, with his website, www.romayasoundhealthandbeauty.com. He can also be reached at romayasoundhealth andbeauty@gmail.com.



A Scientist Deploys Light And Sound To Reveal the Brain in Exquisite Detail

By Jon Hamilton | NPR

brain-maping
Lihong Wang creates the sort of medical technology you’d expect to find on the starship Enterprise.Wang, a professor of biomedical engineering at Washington University in St. Louis, has already helped develop instruments that can detect individual cancer cells in the bloodstream and oxygen consumption deep within the body. He has also created a camera that shoots at 100 billion frames a second, fast enough to freeze an object traveling at the speed of light.”It’s really about turning some of these ideas that we thought were science fiction into fact,” says Richard Conroy, who directs the Division of Applied Science & Technology at the National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering.Wang’s ultimate goal is to use a combination of light and sound to solve the mysteries of the human brain. The brain is a “magical black box we still don’t understand,” he says.Wang describes himself as a toolmaker. And when President Obama unveiled his BRAIN initiative a couple of years ago to accelerate efforts to understand how we think and learn and remember, Wang realized that brain researchers really needed a tool he’d been working on for years.”We want to conquer the brain,” Wang says. “But even for a mouse brain, which is only a few millimeters thick, we really don’t have a technique that allows us to see throughout the whole brain.”Current brain-imaging techniques such as functional MRI or PET scans all have drawbacks. They’re slow, or not sharp enough, or they can only see things near the surface.

So Wang has been developing another approach, one he believes will be fast enough to monitor brain activity in real time and sharp enough to reveal an individual brain cell.

Wang’s initial idea was to use light. There was a problem, though — one that’s obvious if you hold your hand up to a light bulb. When light enters the body, it starts bouncing around.

“This is why we can’t even see our own bone in the hands,” Wang says. “Because light, after, like, a millimeter, it becomes hopeless to get a very good sharp image.”

Wang thought he had a solution. It involved sound. Sound waves don’t bounce around much in the body, which is why an ultrasound can show a growing fetus.

But ultrasound images are blurry, sometimes so blurry it’s hard to tell a boy from a girl. So Wang began experimenting with a technique that blends the speed and precision of light with the penetrating ability of sound. It’s called photoacoustic imaging.

“We’re combining the strengths of two forms of energy, light and sound, in a single form of imaging,” Wang says.

In the past few years, photoacoustic imaging has become a very big deal in the scientific world. And so has Wang.

Last year, he published more than 50 scientific papers. So far his research has attracted nearly $50 million in grant funding. And Caltech was impressed enough to lure him away from Washington University. His lab will be moved from St. Louis to Pasadena over the next year.

In the meantime, Wang seems to be everywhere, delivering speeches, leading meetings and sitting on scientific advisory boards. “It’s really nonstop, right? You have to sleep, but then, other than that, you try to work all the time,” he says.

Wang has so many projects going that his lab now has teams working on four different floors of one research building at Washington University.

One of those projects is Wang’s latest photoacoustic microscope, which occupies much of a metal workbench the size of a pingpong table. Jinyang Liang, a postdoc, shows me how the device turns light into sound and sound into images of a living brain.

“So that big guy, metal box there, is a laser,” Liang tells me. During an experiment, the laser generates pulses of light that travel through a maze of mirrors and filters before reaching an anesthetized mouse on the other side of the table.

Once the pulses of light enter the mouse’s skull and brain, they start to bounce around. But enough light energy gets through to cause molecules of brain tissue to vibrate. And those vibrations produce distinctive sound waves.

So light goes into the brain, and sounds come out. And just a few months ago, those sounds allowed a lab team to create high-speed, highly detailed, three-dimensional images of a mouse brain at work. “When I first saw that, I was amazed,” Liang says.

So was Richard Conroy at the National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering. He says he’s often amazed by Wang, who has been funded by the institute for more than a decade.

“He’s one of these unique people who’s able to take technologies and ideas from one field and apply them to a different field,” Conroy says. “So, for example, his work trying to target light at individual cells within the body — that’s really borrowing ideas from astronomy.”

Photoacoustic imaging can do more than reveal the brain, Conroy says. Wang’s lab has helped develop systems that use the technique to show tumors of the breast and skin, and even detect individual cancer cells in the bloodstream.

And Conroy says that’s just the beginning. “It’s research that really pushes the limits of our understanding of how to image in space and time,” he says.

And that could eventually lead to devices as futuristic as the medical tricorder on the starship Enterprise, Conroy says. “It would be great to have a device like they had in Star Trek. You could just lie there, the beam of light would pass over you, it would be able to tell everything that was wrong with you.”

[Read more here]

Robert O'Leary 150x150Robert O’Leary, JD BARA, has had an abiding interest in alternative health products & modalities since the early 1970’s & he has seen how they have made people go from lacking health to vibrant health. He became an attorney, singer-songwriter, martial artist & father along the way and brings that experience to his practice as a BioAcoustic Soundhealth Practitioner, under the tutelage of the award-winning founder of BioAcoustic Biology, Sharry Edwards, whose Institute of BioAcoustic Biology has now been serving clients for 30 years with a non-invasive & safe integrative modality that supports the body’s ability to self-heal using the power of the human voice. Robert brings this modality to serve clients in Greater Springfield (MA), New England & “virtually” the world, with his website, www.romayasoundhealthandbeauty.com. He can also be reached at romayasoundhealth andbeauty@gmail.com.