Nature

Is Psychiatry Erasing the Individual’s Unique Individuality?

Posted by on August 18, 2015 in Nature, Psychology-Psychiatry, Science with 0 Comments
Is Psychiatry Erasing the Individual’s Unique Individuality?

Since none of the 300 official mental disorders has any defining physical test for diagnosis, there is no proof they exist. Period. You could interview thousands of people who say they feel depressed, and you would find significant differences. The more you listened to their stories, the more you would be convinced of the differences. You would be splitting apart the central idea of “depression” and realizing it has no common center. This is hard for many people to believe. That’s how brainwashed they are. There are no common universal states of consciousness. It’s all unique, from person to person. Just as there is no single enlightened state of consciousness which is the same for everyone, there are no “mental disorder” states that are the same for everyone.

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50 Cent Paper Microscope Could Revolutionize Medicine

50 Cent Paper Microscope Could Revolutionize Medicine

For a whole lot of people, especially those in developing countries, science — and with it, medicine — isn’t readily available to the majority of citizens. But Manu Prakash wants to change that. Prakash, an assistant professor of bioengineering at Stanford, is the proprietor of “frugal science,” a term he coined to explain the movement toward building cheap versions of high tech tools. His endeavour aims to make medical devices both affordable and available to the masses…So in 2014 he created a paper microscope, aptly named the Foldscope, that costs only 50 cents to produce.

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Plants Release Animal-like Substance When Stressed

Posted by on August 3, 2015 in Earth & Space, Nature, Sci-Tech, Science with 1 Comment
Plants Release Animal-like Substance When Stressed

Although plants do not have nervous systems, they respond to stress with chemical and electrical signals that are remarkably similar to those of animals, a new study has found. The findings, published in the journal Nature Communications, could help to explain why certain plant-derived drugs work so well in humans. At the center of it all is the neurotransmitter GABA (gamma-aminobutyric acid), which humans and animals, as well as plants, release when they are stressed out.

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Beam Me Up? Teleporting Real, Even If Trekkie Transport Isn’t

Posted by on August 3, 2015 in Nature, Sci-Tech, Science, Technology with 4 Comments
Beam Me Up? Teleporting Real, Even If Trekkie Transport Isn’t

“I have a hard time saying this with a straight face, but I will: You can teleport a single atom from one place to another,” says Chris Monroe, a biophysicist at the University of Maryland. His lab’s setup in a university basement looks nothing like the slick transporters that rearrange atoms and send them someplace else on Star Trek. Instead, a couple million dollars’ worth of lasers, mirrors and lenses lay sprawled across a 20-foot table. “What they do in the TV show is, they send the atoms over a long distance,” says David Hucul, who recently got his Ph.D. with Monroe. “But, really — if you could build anything, you wouldn’t send the atoms.” That’s because atoms are big and heavy, and you don’t really need them, he explains. The laws of physics say that any atom of carbon is identical to any other atom of carbon. Oxygen, hydrogen and so on: They’re all perfect atomic clones.

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The Amazon Rainforest: Was it ‘Man Made’ by Our Ancestors?

Posted by on August 3, 2015 in Archaeology, Earth & Space, Nature, Sci-Tech, Science with 1 Comment
The Amazon Rainforest: Was it ‘Man Made’ by Our Ancestors?

It is often held aloft by environmental campaign groups as an example of one of the last remaining regions of unspoiled habitat left in the world. But instead of being a pristine rainforest untouched by human hands, the Amazon appears to have been profoundly shaped by mankind. An international team of researchers have published evidence that suggests the Amazon was once home to millions of people who lived and farmed in the area now covered by trees. The scientists claim the Amazon basin was a major centre of crop domestication that saw at least 83 native species being cultivated to some degree.

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Women’s Brains May Be the Most Vulnerable to Alzheimer’s

Women’s Brains May Be the Most Vulnerable to Alzheimer’s

Women’s brains might be more vulnerable to the degenerative effects of Alzheimer’s disease than men’s, causing them to decline in memory and cognitive function twice as fast, according to new research that could explain why women make up two-thirds of all diagnosed Alzheimer’s cases in the US.

The finding was presented this week at the 2015 Alzheimer’s Association International Conference (AAIC) in Washington, DC, with the team also noting that women tend to decline more dramatically than men in cognition, function, and brain size after they’ve been in surgery or under general anaesthesia.

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Brain Area Found That May Make Humans Unique

Posted by on July 25, 2015 in Nature, Psychology-Psychiatry, Sci-Tech, Science with 0 Comments
Brain Area Found That May Make Humans Unique

Neuroscientists have identified an area of the brain that might give the human mind its unique abilities, including language. The area lit up in human, but not monkey, brains when they were presented with different types of abstract information.

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We’re Not All Aging at the Same Rate, Researchers Say

Posted by on July 9, 2015 in Nature, Sci-Tech, Science with 2 Comments
We’re Not All Aging at the Same Rate, Researchers Say

How long we’ve been on the planet isn’t necessarily reflected in our biological age, an international team of scientists has found. According to a new study, some of us are ageing faster than others, and there can be significant variations in how run-down our bodies become as we develop as adults. The team looked at physiological markers in almost 1,000 38-year-olds, and while most had biological ages that roughly matched the number of birthdays they’d celebrated, some of the test subjects had bodies that appeared to be much younger or older, based on a series of medical examinations.

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Watch The Awesome Chemistry of Fireworks (Video)

Posted by on July 4, 2015 in Nature, Sci-Tech, Science, Technology with 0 Comments
Watch The Awesome Chemistry of Fireworks (Video)

Gunpowder is the key ingredient, but as adjunct professor of chemistry John Conkling from Washington College in the US explains in this video, without chemistry, you wouldn’t have burning mixtures and without these you simply can’t have fireworks.

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This Just in: Emotional & Rational Brains ‘physically different’

Posted by on June 21, 2015 in Nature, Psychology-Psychiatry, Sci-Tech, Science with 0 Comments
This Just in: Emotional & Rational Brains ‘physically different’

Researchers at Monash University have found physical differences in the brains of people who respond emotionally to others’ feelings, compared to those who respond more rationally, in a study published in the journal NeuroImage. The work, led by Robert Eres from the University’s School of Psychological Sciences, pinpointed correlations between grey matter density and cognitive and affective empathy. The study looked at whether people who have more brain cells in certain areas of the brain are better at different types of empathy.

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Plants Know When They Are Being Eaten (and Freak Out)

Posted by on June 8, 2015 in Nature, Science with 0 Comments
Plants Know When They Are Being Eaten (and Freak Out)

If you didn’t already recognize plants as sentient beings, maybe this study from the University of Missouri will change your mind: Researchers at the University of Missouri, in a collaboration that brings together audio and chemical analysis, have determined that plants respond to the sounds that caterpillars make when eating plants and that the plants respond with more defenses.

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First Evidence That Parents’ Life Choices May Change Kid’s DNA

Posted by on June 7, 2015 in Nature, Sci-Tech, Science with 0 Comments
First Evidence That Parents’ Life Choices May Change Kid’s DNA

For the first time, scientists have discovered a mechanism in humans that could explain how your lifestyle choices may impact your children and grandchildren’s genes. Mounting evidence suggests that environmental factors such as smoking, diet and stress, can leave their mark on the genes of your children and grandchildren. For example, girls born to Dutch women who were pregnant during a long famine at the end of the second world war had twice the usual risk of developing schizophrenia. Likewise, male mice that experience early life stress give rise to two generations of offspring that have increased depression and anxiety, despite being raised in a caring environment. This has puzzled many geneticists, as genetic information contained in sperm and eggs is not supposed to be affected by the environment, a principle called the August Weismann barrier.

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Take Your First Step Toward ‘Free Energy’: Hope Girl Speaks

Take Your First Step Toward ‘Free Energy’: Hope Girl Speaks

Ever wanted to learn more about free energy or help bring it to us all? Get a Quantum Energy Generator free download in this article & learn more about it with Hope Girl, who was inspired by such amazing people as Kimberly Gamble to bring meaningful hope and change to the world.

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Tiny Songbird Discovered to Fly 1,700 Miles Non-Stop Over Open Ocean

Posted by on April 1, 2015 in Nature, Science with 0 Comments
Tiny Songbird Discovered to Fly 1,700 Miles Non-Stop Over Open Ocean

For more than 50 years, scientists had clues suggesting that a tiny songbird known as the blackpoll warbler fly’s nonstop over the Atlantic Ocean, but proof was hard to come by. Now, an international team of biologists report “irrefutable evidence” that the birds complete a nonstop flight ranging from about 1,410 to 1,721 miles (2,270 to 2,770 km) in just two to three days.

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Scientist Defends WHO Group Report Linking Herbicide to Cancer

Posted by on March 30, 2015 in Earth & Space, Nature, Sci-Tech, Science with 0 Comments
Scientist Defends WHO Group Report Linking Herbicide to Cancer

A World Health Organization group’s controversial finding that the world’s most popular herbicide “probably is carcinogenic to humans” was based on a thorough scientific review and is a key marker in ongoing evaluations of the product, the scientist who led the study said Thursday.

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