THRIVE II PREVIEW

7 Best Tea for Bloating and Stomach Gas Relief

Posted by on December 9, 2019 in Food, Drink & Nutrition, Health with 0 Comments

By Lisa Richards | Lifehack

Does it seem like every meal makes you feel bloated and gassy? Or do bloating and gas strike randomly, for no apparent reason at all?


Whatever the case, you’re probably desperate for a solution to make that nasty bloat go away.

There are many reasons for gassiness and bloating – and most are to do with your gut health.

What Causes Bloating?

Disorders such as inflammatory bowel disease (which includes Crohn’s disease and ulcerative colitis) and celiac disease are the most serious causes of gastrointestinal bloating.[1]

A sluggish bowel is also a major cause, particularly when it leads to chronic constipation. When your gut isn’t emptied often enough, your abdomen can become too ‘full’. Similarly, bloating can result from gastroparesis, a delay in the emptying of food from the stomach into the small intestine. This is often the result of low stomach acid.[2]


Most often, poor gut bacteria are to blame. When ‘bad’ gut bacteria overwhelm your ‘good’ bacteria, the result is some form of dysbiosis. If untreated, this can lead to Small Intestinal Bacterial Overgrowth (SIBO) (too many bad bacteria in the small intestine) or Candida overgrowth.

SIBO occurs when bacteria from one part of the digestive tract end up in the small intestine, or when the naturally occurring bacteria in your small intestine grow out of control. This imbalance of bacteria in your gut can cause bloating, diarrhea, and pain.[3]

Similarly, an overgrowth of Candida albicans yeast can lead to gas and bloating. Candida yeast can usually live naturally in the gut without causing any problems – but when it grows out of control, it can wreak havoc on your normal digestive function.[4]

There may also be certain foods you are allergic or intolerant to. Wheat and dairy are some of the most common causes of bloating, along with fructooligosaccharides (present in onions, garlic, apples and other foods containing high FODMAPs).

Of course, there are times it’s really hard to avoid certain foods! For example, you might know that beans and spices give you a terrible stomach-ache, but your boss has just shouted lunch at the local Mexican restaurant… or, you know that you can’t tolerate dairy products, but your best friend has just given you a box of chocolates for your birthday.

In these cases, it’s helpful to know that relief is just a tea away!

Best 7 Teas To Reduce Bloating

There are many amazing medicinal herbs that can be brewed into a tea for bloating and gas relief. Drinking these teas throughout the day can help to relieve the pain and discomfort of digestive ills.

1. Peppermint Tea

Peppermint is a wonderful herb that has been used to treat digestive ills for centuries. This is all thanks to its active ingredient, menthol.

Menthol is what gives peppermint its ‘minty’ taste. Menthol also delivers a wonderful flavor while helping to reduce inflammation. The anti-inflammatory properties of peppermint tea help to soothe stomach discomfort that can cause bloating and gas.

Studies show that peppermint tea harbors potent antispasmodic properties, which simply means that it helps your intestines to relax. This helps to alleviate that nasty intestinal gas and bloating.

Research has also found that peppermint tea can provide an analgesic (pain-relieving) effect that helps to relieve the discomfort associated with a bloated belly.[5]

2. Ginger Tea

Ginger tea is made from the root (rhizome) of the ginger plant. It’s a spicy, warming flavor that’s both stimulating and nourishing.

Ginger is a powerful anti-emetic, which means it can help to reduce the feeling of nausea and indigestion. It’s been used for hundreds of years as a home remedy for vomiting, stomach upsets, and even morning sickness.

Fresh ginger tea is especially effective in soothing a bloated tummy due to its anti-inflammatory and carminative properties. It’s also an anti-inflammatory, so it’s especially useful for IBS.

Ginger tea has also been found to help your digestive system to empty more quickly and efficiently, which helps prevent that ‘stuffed’ feeling you have after a meal.

3. Chamomile Tea

This gentle tea is renowned for soothing a sore tummy while also boosting mood! Made by steeping chamomile flowers in hot water, chamomile tea offers natural calming effects for the body and mind. It can also help to reduce water retention and improve overall mood and wellbeing.

Research has shown that chamomile is especially helpful for irritable bowel syndrome, helping to soothe the intestinal tract and ‘unclench’ those stomach muscles. It also appears that chamomile can help to combat the bloating effects caused by lactose-containing foods.

Regularly drinking chamomile tea can help to improve sleep quality and relaxation. It appears to work on a chemical level, boosting GABA receptors in the nervous system to improve your mood.[6]

4. Green Tea

Among its many medicinal properties, green tea is a fantastic digestive aid. In fact, it may be one of the best teas for your gut, thanks to its high content of catechins and antioxidants. These catechins are not only powerful scavengers of free radicals (which can damage cells), they help to soothe muscles in your gastrointestinal tract.

Green tea can also help to eliminate the build-up of gas in the intestines, which brings down bloating in your tummy. In addition, green tea helps your digestive system function more efficiently, stimulating the enzymes that your body requires to properly break down food.[7]

5. Hibiscus Tea

We tend to think of the hibiscus as just a pretty flower, but it’s also an excellent digestive tonic. It’s made by infusing the vibrant petals of the hibiscus in boiling water. This produces a fragrant, caffeine-free tea with a distinctive flavor. Some say it even has hints of cranberry!

The great thing about hibiscus tea is that it helps to balance hormones. This can reduce water retention and eliminate bloating, particularly during certain times of the month.

The high flavonoid content of hibiscus tea also helps to modulate aldosterone, the hormone responsible for regulating water intake and electrolyte levels.[8]

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