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Feel Anxious? Sad? Angry? Shift to a Positive Perspective

I was recently asked what people can do to survive the current weird environment.  This query continued:  “We really need to shift our reality away from negativity and fear.  It’s funny because as I type this you are saying in the background on YouTube, ask the good questions.” 

When we feel we’re in a weird environment, full of negativity and fear, we can shift to a positive perspective.  We can take a deep breath, acknowledge the vastness of the Cosmos, and our connection to it, and we can raise our level of consciousness to a higher dimension.  Through this raising of consciousness we can experience sadness transform into vulnerability; anxiety transform into caring; and anger transform into assertiveness.

Your Ongoing Conversation with the Cosmos

Our questions matter a great deal more than most of us consciously realize.  Most every mentally focused, heart-centered, passionately inspired thought and question–even those thought ‘privately’ to ourselves are in actuality one side of an on-going conversation we are engaged in every day of our lives.

This concept garnered some respect when introduced by physicist John Archibald Wheeler, who emphasized that we live in a participatory universe:

“We are not only observers. 
We are participators. 
In some strange sense,
this is a participatory universe.”
    — John Archibald Wheeler

This concept is wonderful, because it provides us with a basis by which we can be scientists, conducting personal experiments in our own lives.  I suggest for best results to start by paying attention to how you are feeling.

On days when your Qi (internal energy) is high, such as when you are in love, or have meditated, exercised, or spent a beautiful day in nature, you may notice that some thoughts seem to instantly manifest in physical reality.

When we’re not feeling strong energy, there are some things we can do to pull ourselves up by the proverbial bootstraps.

The Observer’s Perspective Effect

The so-called “Observer Effect” in quantum physics refers to the principle by which the very act of taking observational measurements in an experiment such as the famous Double Slit Experiment have the effect of determining what will subsequently be observed.

We can thus shift reality by shifting our perspective.  This is a brilliant strategy for virtually any situation that we apparently have no control over.  Obviously, with regard to situations we can influence, we can start creating a to-do list and set reasonable goals that we feel fairly certain we can attain.  But for everything we have minimal or no ability to influence, the absolutely best thing we can do is to adjust our perspective–and change our attitude.  At such a juncture, it’s often helpful to remember that there is a great deal that is bigger than us–and we can trust and have faith that the cosmos was here before we were born, and the cosmos will exist long after we’re gone.

Sometimes we feel temporarily mired in emotional “stuff”–such as feelings of great sadness, tremendous anxiety, or outrage and anger.  When we know that we can take a few steps back and observe ourselves having these emotions, we can begin to pull ourselves out of whatever drama we’re feeling tempted to participate in:  we can become positive observers.

Breathe Slowly and Deeply

One of the simplest ways to lift above feelings of despair, anxiety, and anger is to take some slow, deep, steady breaths.  Inhale with a full, deep, slow breath–and then exhale even more slowly than you just breathed in.  Bring your attention to knowing that in this moment of space and time, you are OK.  Keep breathing slowly and deeply.

Connect with Cosmic Mind

While still breathing slowly and deeply, bring your awareness to the idea that the Cosmos was here long before you arrived in the form you now occupy.  Keep breathing slowly, deeply, and fully and envision that all you really ever need to do is show up in life, and do the best you can for yourself and others.  The Cosmos can do the ‘heavy lifting’ of coordinating all the reality shifts and miracles that may feel completely out of our control.

Become a Positive Observer

It sometimes helps to notice how other people can get caught up in dramas.  People who are feeling constantly sad and downtrodden can seem to be playing the role of Victim; those who seem chronically anxious often play the role of Rescuer; and those who are angry and full of outrage can often (and quite inadvertently) end up playing the role of Persecutor.

When we find ourselves wallowing in seemingly endless sadness, anxiety, or anger we can recognize we might have stepped into some drama ‘quicksand.’  At this stage of awareness, it’s easy for us to come up with all sorts of rationales and reasons why it’s imperative that we must stay ___________ ( depressed / anxious / outraged ), because ___________.  When we raise our level of consciousness by stepping back and observing ourselves, we will notice that those stuck feelings are not actually either necessary nor optimal functioning modes.

As we lift out of lower-vibe emotions, we can move for example, from sadness into vulnerability.  We can move from anxiety into caring.  We can move from anger into assertiveness.  The first step toward becoming positive observers is learning to observe what we are thinking and how we are feeling from a perspective of kindness and unconditional love.  There is value in gaining a higher-order viewpoint, in much the same way that you could easily find a hidden character such as Waldo hiding in a two dimensional ‘flatland’ floor plan.  With the advantage of our three-dimensional observational abilities, we do not need to wander around inside that ‘flatland’ floor plan, but instead can instantly see at a glance where Waldo is hiding.

Raising our level of consciousness grants us the ability to see the bigger picture–that our thoughts and feelings do not define us, but rather are passing through, much like clouds in the sky.   It grants us the ability to rise out of sadness to vulnerability; out of anxiety to caring; and out of anger into assertiveness.

Honoring this shift to positive perspective, we can remember to keep asking, “How good can it get?”

.  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .

And I invite you to watch the companion video to this blog at:

___________________________

QuantumJumps300x150adCynthia Sue Larson is the best-selling author of six books, including Quantum Jumps.  Cynthia has a degree in physics from UC Berkeley, an MBA degree, a Doctor of Divinity, and a second degree black belt in Kuk Sool Won. Cynthia is the founder of RealityShifters, and is president of the International Mandela Effect Conference. Cynthia hosts “Living the Quantum Dream” on the DreamVisions7 radio network, and has been featured in numerous shows including Gaia, the History Channel, Coast to Coast AM, One World with Deepak Chopra, and BBC. Cynthia reminds us to ask in every situation, “How good can it get?” Subscribe to her free monthly ezine at:
RealityShifters



Scientist Shares 4 Things that Help You Grow More Brain Cells (Video)

Video Source: TED

In this Ted Talk, Neuroscientist Sandrine Thuret says we can, and offers research and practical advice on how we can help our brains better perform neurogenesis to improve mood, increase memory formation and prevent the decline associated with aging as well.

Related Article: Are Neuroscientists the Next Great Architects?

She takes us on a tour of the Hippocampus that is responsible for mood and memory, explores the relationship between depression and neurogenesis, and most importantly shares a list of activities that we can do to increase neurogenesis and things we should avoid that reduce neurogenesis.

Here are the things Thuret claims increase neurogenesis:

  1. Learning
  2. Sex
  3. Running
  4. Healthy diet

And here are the things she says decrease neurogenesis:

  1. Stress
  2. Sleep deprivation
  3. Aging
  4. Unhealthy diet

Related Article: How Green Tea Boosts Memory and Special Awareness




Stress Help

Life can be stressful. So much to do, so many things that could possible go wrong. People often assume that because I teach yoga I never get stressed. I assure you, nothing could be further from the truth. This year I’ve co-taught two Yoga for Anxiety courses; not because “I never get stressed and here’s why . . .”, but because sometimes I freak out too and sometimes I use the tools yoga has taught me to help me manage stress. Don’t get me wrong, I don’t pretend to always have the answer for stress. Despite my experience with meditation, breathing techniques, and stress-relieving yoga poses, sometimes I still find myself self-medicating with Ben and Jerry’s.

 

Here’s what I do when I get stressed. First, I take a bunch of sighs out my mouth, mostly when I’m driving or alone and can really let it fly. I try to make it as dramatic as possible. I think this helps. I’ll try to relax my jaw and notice whether my stress lessens even by just a couple of sighs. Sometimes I’ll sigh for 5 minutes or so. Next, I’ll practice ujjayi breath, whisper breath. A lot of you know this but it’s the breathing you use during yoga practice where you breathe in and out of your nostrils and put a little whisper in the back of your throat, elongating your breaths. It really helps. I’ve read something about this form of breathing activating your parasympathetic nervous system, the opposite of your flight or flight nervous response. Try it.

 

I will also do something physically active, like go to a yoga class, put on my running shoes and hit a trail, or even just take a 10 minute walk around the block, even if I don’t have the time to do so. It’s incredible how my perception changes when I get outside or at least get moving for a bit. Wallace Stevens once wrote, “Perhaps the truth depends upon a walk around the lake.” Yoga explores the relationship between mind and body. If my body can relax, maybe my mind can follow. Putting some endorphins in my body and some oxygen in my brain is a great way to make me feel good and clear my mind.

 

Next, I’ll actually look the bull straight into the eyes and see it for what it is. I’ll try a meditation technique where I try to adopt the role as the observer rather than the one who is oppressed by stress. One day, I felt like I was feeling a lot of stress and caught myself trying to avoid it or pretend it wasn’t there. I had a few minutes to meditate and instead of mentally escaping it, I decided to look at it straight on. I closed my eyes and noticed how my body felt in response to the stress. I observed the images in my mind and emotions in my heart and thoughts in my brain, everything associated with this stress and tried to just observe it rather than fix it. The more I looked at it, the more I realized that what I was feeling was a call to action.  Suddenly I noticed this feeling as more of a protection for my heart rather than an enemy to my heart. After my meditation, I still felt this same energy in my chest but with the added feeling of gratitude for what I was feeling. Through my meditation, my observation, I was able to see this feeling for what it was instead of trying to avoid it and worry about the monster I felt was breathing down my neck.

 

I can assure you that I’ll be using these techniques repeatedly.  Maybe you can use some of these techniques if you find yourself freaking out about anything. Try to do some breathing techniques, go to a yoga class, or try to meditate. I realize, too that the only thing yoga class does not incorporate is the Ben and Jerry’s therapy. Maybe after class you could go and get some ice cream.

 

Scott Moore is a senior teacher of yoga and mindfulness in the US (New York, Salt Lake City, LA) and abroad and currently lives in Southern France. When he’s not teaching or conducting retreats, he writes for Conscious Life News, Elephant Journal, Mantra Magazine, Medium, and his own blog at scottmooreyoga.com. Scott also loves to run, play the saxophone, and travel with his wife and son. Check out his yoga retreats to places like Tuscany and France , his online Yoga Nidra Course and his Yoga Teacher Mentor Program

 




Staying Grounded in a Topsy-Turvy World

If there’s one thing that’s constant about the Universe it’s that things are always in a state of flux. Sometimes we are caught up in the momentum of this motion of change to the degree that it becomes impossible to avoid feeling constantly rushed, out of time, and strained. 

We may skillfully navigate these changes by creating a grounded seat from which all this change may happen around us without making us lose our center. With this grounded relationship to the changes that occur, we’ll find ourselves not only able to navigate change but even thriving with this change. Here are a few ideas to help us stay grounded.

A Simple Meditation

Research suggests that mindfulness benefits our bodies, not just our minds.

Find a quiet place where you can possibly be undisturbed for a few moments (sometimes this is sitting in your car). Sit comfortably and set a timer for 10 minutes. Close your eyes and begin to count your breathes backward from 30. As you exhale you’ll say in your mind, “30.” As you inhale, “29.” Exhale, “28,” etc. If your mind wanders or you loose your count, start over with the counting. The objective is be completely present with the number you’re on, not even to get to zero. You may get distracted 20 times or complete the cycle 3 times. Simple continue counting your breaths until the timer rings. You may wish to expand this to 15, 20, or 30 minutes. This is a very simply way of allowing your mind to focus on something simple and singular to practice being grounded.

Get Outside

Make a point to go on a gentle walk. Find the joy in walking for the sake of walking. Inform yourself of the natural world and make a point to notice the trees, sky, flowers, etc. Like Wallace Steven’s said, “Perhaps the truth depends upon a walk around the lake.” When placing yourself in nature, you often remind yourself of your role in the world and how you too are naturally the way you are. Nature reminds us that we are a part of this beautiful, naturally ordered Universe. Use this walk with its sensory delights and gentle movement to ground you in the moment. Try to avoid allowing your mind to plan or scheme. Just do your best to be present. 

Practice Yoga

Practice yoga. Go to a yoga class or simply do a few of your favorite poses in your living room. Remember to match your breath with the poses that your body seems to crave. If you’re doing a personal practice, don’t worry about practicing for a certain amount of time, just practice whatever feels the most natural. Allow your body the pleasure of gently warming up then release tensions with some long, slow, deep stretches. Give yourself several moments to rest in savasana (corpse pose) and then go about your day.

With some help with some simple practices like these we can keep ourselves grounded in a topsy-turvy world. As you do so, you’ll fee grounded and ready to meet the changes that are unfolding for you.

 

Namaste.

 

Scott Moore is a senior teacher of yoga and mindfulness in the US (New York, Salt Lake City, LA) and abroad and currently lives in Southern France. When he’s not teaching or conducting retreats, he writes for Conscious Life News, Elephant Journal, Mantra Magazine, Medium, and his own blog at scottmooreyoga.com. Scott also loves to run, play the saxophone, and travel with his wife and son. Check out his yoga retreats to places like Tuscany and France , his online Yoga Nidra Course and his Yoga Teacher Mentor Program




How About Making Your Holiday $eason More About Presence (Rather Than Presents)?

GiftsWhat is it about the “Holiday Season” that gets us so amped up with good tidings and merry wishes yet at the same time so utterly stressed out that underneath the plastered smiles and ugly sweaters we secretly cannot wait for it all to be over? While most of us seem to enjoy the forthcoming smells of gingerbread, pine and peppermint, I find that, for adults at least, the olfactory adulations are quite often short-lived.

We make our lists and check them more than twice, groaning at what we can’t afford or can’t find in his or her size. We surf the net tirelessly for the best deals, cursing our online shopping cart that if our order doesn’t arrive by the 23rd all hell will break loose, while the more courageous of us bustle their way through store crowds, wishing on a tree-top star that what they came for is still in stock. We drag those dusty boxes of tangled lights and decorations out of the attic to adorn our homes and God help whoever is near us if those lights refuse to flash, the cat heaves up a tinsel-laden hairball, or worse yet, we come a-tumbling down off the roof in the process of said preparations.

I remember as a child being utterly STOKED for Christmas morning to come. Mind you I come from a “Catholic-meshed-with-a-bit-of-Jewish” family so my holiday season was at its core a rather interesting one riddled with some underlying guilt and latkes. Usually the guilt came after the inhalation of too many of those latkes. All jokes aside, my family mostly sided with the Catholic tradition, so we opted for sacrificing live trees over spinning dreidels. OK, now all jokes aside.

In those days, I always loved this time of year for a couple of reasons. For one, I got to be heard, and was not promptly told, “No!” for sharing things I wished for, which believe it or not wasn’t always a list of material goods. Instead I was asked, “What would you like to have?” and that simple acknowledgement; that presence bestowed upon a kid is just an indescribable feeling. To have a time of year, where your feelings are put on the front burner and given the utmost attention is an exhilarating high to children, and is way better than any candy-induced sugar rush!

But of course we’ve all heard the phrase, “too much of a good thing” which leads to my second favorite thing. I knew I would get to see all of my extended family…and they would ALL have gifts for me! Mind you, I’ve since mostly grown out of my societally-molded materialism, but to this day it still makes me wonder. As a society, which aspect of this yearly tradition of gift-giving (and receiving) are we feeding into our kids to be the centerpiece of the holiday season? Granted I have no children of my own, but hey I was one once, so I like to think I’m speaking from experience here. Have we turned these “tidings of cheer” into mere expectations that can only be fulfilled by a swipe of your credit card? Have we taken the spirit out of the celebration, regardless of the religious or non-religious context your beliefs fall under? Do we simply go along to get along because Hallmark has taken over yet another day on the Gregorian calendar, and to feel connected and a part of something, we must then conform to make it all about the presents and less about the presence?

In the American tradition, the story goes that a jolly, bearded man in a red and white suit somehow manages to cruise around the world in a large sleigh guided by magical, flying reindeer carrying one gift for every good child on the entire planet. Children throughout the year are kept in line by the repeated announcement of this magical event and are continually reminded that “naughty” children will only get a lump of coal in their stockings. This last tidbit of information ALWAYS ticked me off as a kid and I even called out an unsuspecting mall Santa on it one year asking how in the world he manages to carry not only enough presents in his sleigh, but also what I imagined to be a hefty amount of coal. I never did get an answer that satisfied me, only a look of complete bewilderment.

The story continues that on his journey this jolly man eats what I always imagined to be millions of cookies chased by millions of glasses of milk (no bathroom breaks, either – there is NO time for that nonsense); he then leaves gifts under the sacrificial tree as his way of saying thank you to all the “good” boys and girls. Seriously, who comes up with this stuff? This sounds less like a feasible explanation as to how those wrapped boxes magically appear under the tree on Christmas morning, and more like a college kid explaining his first experience with LSD. Wouldn’t it make more sense for someone to build an Oreo factory on the North Pole to satisfy Santa’s cookie addiction, rather than having him go through this ridiculous fiasco for a one night bender every year? I even considered writing Sesame Street at one point to inquire how they dealt with Cookie Monster’s hang-up.

Up until about 8 years old, I thought it was THE coolest story ever, and before that I had bought the fable hook, line and sinker. There I sat, year after year, writing my letter addressed to the North Pole, never knowing it would end up in Mom’s box of “Tam’s cute creations”. I sat on the laps of many mall Santas, and while I was always a tad suspicious, and bold enough to point out he never looked the same as last year, I nonetheless told him exactly what I expected to be under that tree come Christmas morning; it was just too risky not to. Besides, Santa always laughed funny, like my Pop-Pop; he was nothing like that huge, terrifying rabbit that came around in springtime. (Why are mall Easter bunnies always SO creepy?)

As I grew older, I eventually stopped buying this malarkey narrative and wanted to meet the kid who came up with the whole story of Santa and his magical flying reindeer, because even at 8 years old I could not believe that an adult had wrangled up this tall tale, with its so many insults to the laws of physics (not to mention the space-time continuum), and had just expected children to eat it up like chocolate! But then again I was never a “normal” kid, and being the kid that I was, I of course always asked too many questions, debating the probability of this amazing feat of a man so obviously out of shape. I further argued that even if Santa only spent 5 minutes in every child’s home, there was still no way he could pull it all off in one night (I even had fractions and equations to prove it). And perhaps the argument to completely piss off the majority of adults in my family was that the reindeer should’ve had names like Ruth and Betsy, not obvious masculine names (sans Prancer) because my Zoo Cards had taught me that male deer drop their antlers in winter, therefore Santa’s reindeer had to be girls! Yeah, I was a tough kid to love, I imagine.

While I strongly encourage one to hang onto your childlike sense of wonder and imagination, what if we simply tried using this special time of year to teach children the importance of gratitude, appreciation and just BEING? Rather than filling their minds with the exotic grandeur of the” flying fat man” and his cookie addiction-driven night of fulfilling America’s materialistic desires, we just breathe…and enjoy those things in our lives which cannot be bought. Like Uncle Bob for always getting soup stuck in his beard while he shares the same old war stories every single year, or Aunt Rose for drinking too much wine and laughing so hard she pees a little and has to tell everyone, and cousin Mitch who lives and works seven states away, and whom you never see…except for this time of year.

Over time, religious and non-religious folks alike have come to celebrate this holiday in their own ways, while mostly sticking to the basic core traditions such as decorating the tree, hanging stockings and of course, exchanging gifts. But when all of those gifts have been unwrapped and all of the trees are out on the curb, what we are left with is mere reflection. We can choose to see only all of this cool new “stuff” we received, or we can choose to look a little deeper and see just how amazing our own little world always was, simply because we are alive.

How about we not let this time of year stress us out, but guide us inward? And let’s not get more wrapped up than the presents we exchange; for like all of time, the Holiday Season is fleeting. It’s never really been about the monetary value, but rather the momentary value. And as with all moments, it brings experiences and memories to be cherished; and the reminder that presence is the greatest gift of all.

To you and yours…Happy Holidays! XOXO

TamaraRantTamara Rant is a Co-Editor of CLN as well as a Licensed Reiki Master, heart-centered Graphic Designer and a progressive voice in social media activism & awareness. Connect with Tamara on Facebook by visiting Prana Paws/Healing Hearts Reiki or go to RantDesignMedia.com

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Not an Escape

Entering Sacred Space

Something unique happens when we come to the yoga studio or sit on our meditation cushions. We close the door behind us, shutting the noisy world outside. We remove the dirt and insulation of our well-worn shoes, forgetting for a moment the path we have trodden to arrive. We take off our coats, those heavy responsibilities we carry like burdens. We even drop our bag carrying our identification card proclaiming who we are.

And then, lighter, like walking on sacred ground, we enter the yoga studio or meditation center and roll out our mat or set up our cushion to sit, our sacred practice space. 

 

There’s No Escape

 
It’s difficult not to feel like we are escaping from something. The irony is that the more we try to escape the world, the more the world seems to be on our heels. You may say to yourself, “I’m consciously escaping the world. Ah, how sweet!” But the moment you step out of the studio it feels as though what you were trying to escape has you by the throat again. “Damn you, World!” you cry as you pump your fist in the air. Unfortunately, our problems and circumstances don’t go away because we choose to ignore them.
 
Instead, as we practice yoga, we choose to momentarily hang up our responsibilities and problems like our coat on the hook. Yes, and so doing, we refine the conversation with our truer selves, the constant part of us that is the same whether or not we made our mortgage payment on time. In yoga practice, we quiet and focus our minds, open our hearts, and ground ourselves as we move, strengthen, and stretch our bodies, the divine vehicle for mind and spirit. And as we get into the groove of our practice, our practice feels more real than even our mortgage payment.
 

 

Changing Your Relationship

 

CREDIT Adam Jones
Model: Niels Alpert

After class, having touched this truer self, we now have the privilege to go back and grab our bag, don our coat, and put on our shoes, now with a different relationship to our responsibilities. Either they are no longer a burden but rather a sacred stewardship, one that grows from the relationship we have with the brilliance of our truer selves, or we now have the clarity and courage to change that which doesn’t make us feel alive. Our problems don’t change but our relationship to them does.
 
As we practice yoga and meditation regularly and apply this concept of relationship, we begin to treat our life like our yoga practice, balanced with steadiness and ease, with power and grace, and with an open heart and full attention. Now, we are summoning our highest selves to lead this life. With this higher self in control, what we finally escape is not the entire world, just the part of it that contained that old self who carried all those burdens and who lacked the power to make courageous changes.

 

Scott Moore is a senior teacher of yoga and mindfulness in New York City and when he’s not teaching or conducting retreats, he writes for Conscious Life News, Elephant Journal, Mantra Magazine, and his own blog at scottmooreyoga.com. Scott also loves to trail run, play the saxophone, and travel with his wife and son. Check out his yoga retreats to places like Hawaii and Amalfi Coast , his online Yoga Nidra Course and his Yoga Teacher Mentor Program




4 Easy Massage Techniques YOU Can Do to Prepare HER for Better Sex

tub soak for 2GCN

By Desiree Gallas |Mens’s Fitness

Admit it, you’ve probably given your woman more than one half-assed rubdown thinking it was all you had to do to warm her up for sex. But you can do better. “Think of massage as sex without the penetration,” says Juan Urosa, a licensed massage therapist from New York City’s acclaimed Great Jones Spa. These 4 massage tips will help turn her on so you both have better sex.

Related Article: Guys: These 4 Tips Guarantee You’ll Give Her the Best Erotic Massage of Her Life

SOAK HER MUSCLES

 Get her relaxed before you amaze her. “Prepare a bath and pour in some essential oils,” Urosa says. (You’ll find them in any “chick” store.) “The bath will get her muscles ready for the massage.” And it gives you an excuse to towel her off.

MAKE HER COMFORTABLE

Have her lie on your bed, facedown. Soften your hands with massage oil, then start rubbing her feet, not her back. “We have thousands of nerve endings in our soles that stimulate the entire nervous system,” Urosa says. “Massage each foot, then slowly move up to her calves, then legs, and so on.” Keep the progression slow.

 

CHANGE UP YOUR STROKES

“Start with compressions—lean on the heels of your palms and apply pressure onto her muscles,” Urosa says. Then knead—don’t poke—her muscles with your fingers. Feather strokes are great on tender areas. Just roll your fingers back and forth while you move your hands up and down the muscle. “Pay attention to the top part of each muscle where it meets the bone.”

FOCUS ON HER PLEASURE ZONES

Related Article A Male Tantric Healer Shares What He Has Discovered About Female Sexuality

“Her inner thighs up to her pelvic bone, her glutes, and pectoral muscles are all highly sensual areas,” Urosa says. They’re also neglected by the pros. “Use compressions followed by kneading on the inner thighs, butt, and tailbone, and feather strokes on the breasts.”

Related Article: Here’s What Happens When You Massage These 3 Key Spots On Your Ear

Bonus Tip:
Ninety-one percent of women say their whole day would be better if they could find just 10 minutes a day to relieve their stress. So get to it!




Stressed?

Image from www.collective-evolution.com.

People often assume that because I teach yoga I never get stressed. I assure you, nothing could be further from the truth. I’ve co-taught Yoga for Anxiety courses, not because I never get stressed, but because sometimes I freak out too and sometimes I use the tools yoga has taught me to help me manage stress. Don’t get me wrong, I don’t pretend to always have the answer for stress. Despite my experience with meditation, breathing techniques, and stress-relieving yoga poses, sometimes I still find myself self-medicating with Ben and Jerry’s.

Here’s what I do when I get stressed. First, I take a bunch of sighs out my mouth, mostly when I’m driving or alone and can really let it fly. I try to make it as dramatic as possible. I think this helps. I’ll try to relax my jaw and notice whether my stress lessens even by just a couple of sighs. Sometimes when I’m really worked up, I’ll sigh for 5 minutes or so. Next, I’ll practice ujjayi breath, whisper breath. A lot of you know this but it’s the breathing you use during yoga practice where you breathe in and out of your nostrils and put a little whisper in the back of your throat, elongating your breaths. It really helps. I’ve read something about this form of breathing activating your parasympathetic nervous system, the opposite of your flight or flight nervous response. Try it.

I will also do something physically active, like go to a yoga class, put on my running shoes and hit a trail, or even just take a 10 minute walk around the block, even if I don’t have the time to do so. It’s incredible how my perception changes when I get outside or at least get moving for a bit. Wallace Stevens once wrote, “Sometimes the truth depends upon a walk around the lake.” Yoga explores the relationship between mind and body. If my body can relax, maybe my mind can follow. Putting some endorphins in my body and some oxygen in my brain is a great way to make me feel good and clear my mind.

Next, I’ll actually look the bull straight into the eyes and see it for what it is. I’ll try a meditation technique where I try to adopt the role as the observer rather than the one who is oppressed by stress. The other day, I felt like I was feeling a lot of stress and caught myself trying to avoid it or pretend it wasn’t there. I had a few minutes to meditate and instead of mentally escaping it, I decided to look at it straight on. I closed my eyes and noticed how my body felt in response to the stress. I observed the images in my mind and emotions in my heart and thoughts in my brain, everything associated with this stress and tried to just observe it rather than fix it.

Suddenly I noticed this feeling as more of a protection for my heart rather than an enemy to my heart. After my meditation, I still felt this same energy in my chest but with the added feeling of gratitude for what I was feeling. Through my meditation, my observation, I was able to see this feeling for what it was instead of trying to avoid it and worry about the monster I felt was breathing down my neck.

I can assure you I’ll continue to use these techniques throughout my life. Maybe you can use some of these techniques if you find yourself freaking out about anything. Try to do some breathing techniques, come to a yoga class, or try to meditate.

Mike Mozart –
Ben & Jerry’s Hazed & Confused Core Ice Cream | Flickr

I realize, too that the only thing yoga class does not incorporate is the Ben and Jerry’s therapy. Maybe after class you should go and get some ice cream.

What are the tools that help you work with stress?

 

 

Scott Moore Yoga

Photo by Dallas Graham

Scott Moore is a senior teacher of yoga and mindfulness in New York City and when he’s not teaching or conducting retreats, he writes for Conscious Life News, Elephant Journal, Mantra Magazine, and his own blog at scottmooreyoga.com. Scott also loves to trail run, play the saxophone, and travel with his wife and son. Check out his yoga retreats to places like Hawaii and Amalfi Coast and his Yoga Teacher Mentor Program




How to Deal With Overwhelm in 5 Simple Steps

… and move forward to achieve your goals and dreams

Overwhelm has been a recurring theme recently amongst my mastermind group members. It’s a problem for many people especially solopreneurs, and even soulopreneurs!

You want to achieve your big vision and goals, but life gets in the way, time is flying by and there just aren’t enough hours in the day… or so it seems.

Here are 5 simple steps to help you overcome overwhelm using the 3M’s of Mindfulness, Manifestation and Management.

Step 1 The Power of Intention

Words are powerful manifesters, so be mindful of what you express as you may manifest the opposite of what you want! Every time you think or say that there aren’t enough hours in the day, that’s what manifests. Time is relative, as Einstein’s theory states, so when you are stressed and in a hurry to get something done, time rushes by – the opposite of what you want it to do.

The intention I express when I know I have a long to do list is to say”there are plenty of hours in the day to get the important things done”. Try it! Just saying that can make you feel calmer and clear your mind to get more done.

Step 2 Slow Down and Breathe

First of all, take a couple of minutes and breathe deeply, focusing completely on your breath. That in itself will give you a feeling of inner peace.

Just focusing on your breathing will also slow down your thoughts and your reactions, which will give you the space to think clearly. I have a saying I developed from my work with horses – the more time you take, the faster you’ll get there. I know that seems counter-intuitive but it’s true. Horses pick up on your energy when you try to rush them, and instead of achieving the result you want, you achieve the opposite and make the situation worse.

When you try to rush a task, at the same time thinking about all the other things on your list, the quality of your work suffers and you feel stressed so the energy attached to the outcome is affected too. (Remember, everything is energy and vibration.) Your mind flits from one task to the other so instead of achieving your task faster it actually takes longer.

Step 3 Reassess, Re-prioritize and Refocus

Are the things on your list REALLY important? Reassess them and cross off or reschedule the ones that aren’t important or urgent. Is your overwhelm due to what’s happening today or is it an ongoing problem? If it’s today, just focus on what absolutely MUST be done today which would have dire consequences if they don’t get done. Then you can start tomorrow with a whole new approach feeling good that you got the important stuff done.

Also assess why you’re feeling overwhelmed. Is it due to things outside your control or under your control? If it’s outside of your control – your child got sick so you had to drop everything to pick her up from school or you got a flat tire on the way back from an appointment so you had to wait for the roadside rescue to change it for you. The best way to approach these situations is to practice acceptance, then do steps 1 and 2.

If it is due to things under your control, it’s time to take the necessary steps to correct the problem. Perhaps you’ve been procrastinating and putting off doing the work until the last minute so you’re up against a tight deadline. Maybe you didn’t have a plan with clear steps to take to complete the work within the time available. Perhaps you’ve taken on too much and need to learn to say no. Once you’ve got over the immediate need to get things done today, it’s time to recognize what you need to change in yourself stop (or minimize) this happening in the future.

Step 4 Single-Tasking – Not Multi-Tasking

There’s an interesting study that confirms that women are better at multi-tasking than men (https://www.bbc.com/news/science-environment-24645100), but the study also says that

Both women and men slowed down, and made more mistakes, as the switching became more rapid.

The problem with multi-tasking is that you are introducing interruption, which means that every time you switch tasks you have to spend time getting back to the point where you left off.

This brings me back to step 3 – reassess, re-prioritize and refocus, then do one thing at a time in the right sequence.

The study also says

A group of women and men were given eight minutes to complete a series of tasks – locating restaurants on a map, doing simple maths problems, answering a phone call, and deciding how they would search for a lost key in a field.

Completing all these assignments in eight minutes was impossible – so it forced men and women to prioritize, organize their time, and keep calm under pressure.

Follow that same process and you’ll work more effectively and efficiently to get the essential work done in the time available.

Step 5 Baby Steps

The common saying ‘the devil is in the detail’ actually originated from an earlier expression ‘God is in the detail’. I like to say ‘the Divine is in the detail’ as it is those baby steps that move you from where you are now to the achievement of your goal.

When you have a plan made up of small steps you don’t waste time thinking through what you need to do every time you work on that particular project. You can just look at your plan and get straight to completing the next task.

If you make each task too big, you immediately risk introducing resistance (“I haven’t time to do that right now” or “It’s too hard”) resulting in procrastination and missed deadlines, extending the time that it will take to achieve the end goal or outcome, or even making you give up completely.

Invest time in making a plan so you become more efficient in your use of time. Make each step in the plan the smallest possible so you avoid creating resistance (for help with this read the excellent book ‘One Small Step Can Change Your Life: The Kaizen Way‘), plus the more small tasks you can complete, the more you have to celebrate and really feel good about yourself.

More ways to deal with overwhelm

I wrote another article on overwhelm back in 2014 that gives additional tips on how to beat overwhelm and how to prevent it. You can find that article at www.thesuccessalchemist.net.

Follow this advice and you’ll not only reduce your stress levels due to overwhelm, you’ll also become more productive by adopting these management strategies.

Jan Moore The Success AlchemistJan Moore – The Success Alchemist, is a Spiritual Empowerment and Intuitive Success Coach. She provides practical life and business strategies plus intuitive guidance, sprinkled with spiritual and metaphysical principles so you can create unstoppable success in life and business. Jan also hosts the Cosmic Creating Radio Show every Saturday on Cosmic Reality Radio. Get your FREE copy of her Dream Achievers Success Kit or sample the power of her coaching with a no-cost Unstoppable Success Strategy Session.

 




Stress & Depression Early in Life Stunts Our Reward Circuits

By Elsevier | * Science Daily

Depression - child

Early life stress is a major risk factor for later episodes of depression. In fact, adults who are abused or neglected as children are almost twice as likely to experience depression.

Scientific research into this link has revealed that the increased risk following such childhood adversity is associated with sensitization of the brain circuits involved with processing threat and driving the stress response. More recently, research has begun to demonstrate that in parallel to this stress sensitization, there may also be diminished processing of reward in the brain and associated reductions in a person’s ability to experience positive emotions.

Researchers at Duke University and the University of Texas Health Sciences Center at San Antonio looked specifically at this second phenomenon in a longitudinal neuroimaging study of adolescents, in order to better understand how early life stress contributes to depression.

They recruited 106 adolescents, between the ages of 11-15, who underwent an initial magnetic resonance imaging scan, along with measurements of mood and neglect. The study participants then had a second brain scan two years later.

The researchers focused on the ventral striatum, a deep brain region that is important for processing rewarding experiences as well as generating positive emotions, both of which are deficient in depression.

“Our analyses revealed that over a two-year window during early to mid-adolescence, there was an abnormal decrease in the response of the ventral striatum to reward only in adolescents who had been exposed to emotional neglect, a relatively common form of childhood adversity where parents are persistently emotionally unresponsive and unavailable to their children,” explained first author Dr. Jamie Hanson.

[Read more here]

* Originally entitled: “Early life stress and adolescent depression linked to impaired development of reward circuits”

Story Source: The above post is reprinted from materials provided by Elsevier. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.

Journal Reference: Jamie L. Hanson, Ahmad R. Hariri, Douglas E. Williamson. Blunted Ventral Striatum Development in Adolescence Reflects Emotional Neglect and Predicts Depressive Symptoms. Biological Psychiatry, 2015; 78 (9): 598 DOI: 10.1016/j.biopsych.2015.05.010
Robert O'Leary 150x150

Robert O’Leary, JD BARA, has had an abiding interest in alternative health products & modalities since the early 1970’s & he has seen how they have made people go from lacking health to vibrant health. He became an attorney, singer-songwriter, martial artist & father along the way and brings that experience to his practice as a BioAcoustic Soundhealth Practitioner, under the tutelage of the award-winning founder of BioAcoustic Biology, Sharry Edwards, whose Institute of BioAcoustic Biology has now been serving clients for 30 years with a non-invasive & safe integrative modality that supports the body’s ability to self-heal using the power of the human voice. Robert brings this modality to serve clients in Greater Springfield (MA), New England & “virtually” the world, with his website, www.romayasoundhealthandbeauty.com. He can also be reached at romayasoundhealthandbeauty@gmail.com.




Stressed? Try One of These 7 Simple Stress Busters

Stress ReliefLet’s face it, we all experience some level of stress in our lives. Stress can shorten our lives, ruins relationships and may cause us to make unwise and unhealthy decisions because our rational thinking is compromised due to the stress we are experiencing in our lives. If you are frequently exposed to stressful situations in your life, I suggest giving these 7 simple stress busters a try.

7 Simple Stress Relievers

  1. Meditation – Any type of meditation will help you tune out the outside world and redirect your focus to your inner world. Here’s a sample of a meditation that is excellent for stress – 
  2. Get Some Fresh Air – Spending time outside in nature is a wonderful way of staying present as you connect to the elements. When we are present in the moment, we aren’t as focused on our past and future worries. Enjoying the great outdoors helps us to ground and center as we breathe in fresh air and soak up the wonderful sounds, textures and fragrances of our environment.
  3. Exercise – Get your body moving whether it is with yoga, martial arts, dance, biking or whatever activity gets your body going and your blood pumping to release those healthy endorphins.
  4. Unplug Yourself – Take a break from social media for 24 hours. If we were to calculate how much time we waste by checking in with social media, reading our emails and watching television, we would be shocked. Not only are these activities a giant time drain, but being around electronics 24/7 is unhealthy for our bodies. The electromagnetic smog does build up and often causes headaches and disrupts our nervous system.
  5. TLC – A massage, Reiki treatment, reflexology or any type of modality where you receive the royal treatment is so good for the mind, body and spirit. If money is a factor, you can always see if you can barter with someone you know and trust. I suggest scheduling TLC sessions at least twice a month. I like to view my TLC sessions as rewards for my hard work.
  6. Change the Scenery. Taking a road trip to somewhere new will change your day to day scenery. This will bring in different stimuli to your senses and I guarantee your senses will thank you for it!
  7. Turn Up The Music – Listening, singing and dancing to your favorite song, singer or band is an excellent stress reliever. Automatically you will feel your spirits lift and shift your mind set as you connect with music. Music/sound is quick and easy and brings us to our happy place.

These 7 stress busters will not make your problems or challenges disappear but they will help you move into a different healthier mind set, which often is all that is needed to cope with the day to day stressors of life.

Blessings and Light,

Laurie Barraco

 

Laurie Barraco

Laurie Barraco

Laurie Barraco is a professional intuitive counselor, medium, author, recording artist, teacher and the owner of The Mystical Moon, a healing center in Fort Myers, Florida. Laurie offers readings, courses and healing products through The Mystical Moon Online Store. You can connect with her at The Mystical Moon Facebook Page.

Click here for articles written by Laurie

 

 




Does Happiness Really Help You Live Longer?

commit to your happiness

By Emiliana R. Simon-Thomas | Greater Good

Will happiness help you to live a long and healthy life?

Decades of studies have suggested the answer is yes, which makes the cultivation of subjective well-being  (a more technical term that researchers often use to talk about human happiness) seem like a matter of life and death. But a new analysis of data from the UK Million Women Study concludes that happiness has no bearing on mortality. The study examined whether electronically-collected survey data about health and happiness, from just under 720,000 women in their 50s and 60s, predicted them dying from any cause within the next 8 to 13 years.

Related Article: The One Decision Every Man Must Make to Live a Happy Life

The conclusions? If you have two people and one of them says they feel happy “most of the time” while the other says “rarely,” neither one is more or less likely to die sooner than the other. Further, the authors argue that lesser-happiness is the result, not a causal factor, in poorer health—and that health problems, regardless of happiness levels, are the real culprit driving differences in mortality. In other words, it doesn’t matter if you’re happy or not, it’s just the luck of the draw of whether you’ll get sick, which will probably make you unhappy, and also kill you sooner.

These data promise to add some nuance to our understanding to how emotions affect our health. But a closer look at the questions the researchers asked—and the nature of their conclusions—reveals that we shouldn’t be so quick to accept that happiness makes no difference to longevity.

What exactly is happiness?

The problem starts with how loosely people in general use the word happiness, and how the authors of this study measured happiness. Indeed, this definitional problem vexes nearly all studies of human happiness.

In the Million Women Study, researchers asked women to rate how frequently they felt happy, from “rarely/never” to “most of the time.” There’s nothing inherently flawed about this question, but it does frame happiness in a particular way—as a finite, repeated experience that occurs day-in-and-day-out, at a different rate for different people. It also relies on peoples’ retrospective assessment of their experiences, which are shaped to prioritize emotional salience both good and bad. This rendering of happiness aligns with a contemporary western cultural notion that happiness is akin to how many times we experience highly arousing personal pleasure on a given day.

Or, to put it in the terms of emotion science, The Million Women Study version of happiness amounts to the sum of felt positive emotions like joy, pleasure, pride, and enthusiasm—emotions that are about gratifying personal desires. In neuroscience terms, these states are signaled principally by the mesolimbic dopaminergic reward system. These do feel good, but evolution has sculpted this system to keep us looking for the next good thing; they don’t last.

Related Article: Is Optimism Actually Beneficial or Harmful?

Why is that a problem? Because theirs is only one among several frameworks for understanding happiness—and it might not be the best one for evaluating its role in health and mortality. Most human languages reveal the origins of happiness as an involuntary state that emerges from luck or fortune. “Hap” is an old German word that means “chance”—think of the implications of other words that involve “hap,” like “hapless,” “perhaps,” or “happenstance.” This linguistic bias might prime us to think about happiness as passively received, lucky pleasure, rather than a product of intention and effort—a bias that’s embedded in the way the Million Woman researchers posed their question to participants, which can easily be read as “How often does happy happen to you?”

The emphasis on chance makes happiness seem rather random and arbitrary. But throughout recorded human history, thinkers have also rejected this way of thinking. According to Aristotle, for example, happiness is best expressed as a life lived with meaning and virtue—a conception that suggests true happiness might involve sacrifice or duty—and not always be a momentarily pleasurable or joyous affair. It also suggests that happiness is something you need to earn.

Recent scientific inquiry suggests that Aristotle may have had a point, as we more and more find that lifetime happiness is entwined with meaningful social connections and a sense of belonging. I recently heard Richard Davidson, Director of the Center for Investigating Healthy Minds at the University of Wisconsin, define the four pillars of well-being as: Optimism, Kindness, Resilience and Awareness. (OKRA, anyone? It’s supposed to be good for you.) He suggests that a lifetime of neuroplasticity enables us to deliberately cultivate and strengthen these characteristics within ourselves in order to be happier.

Related Article: This Simple Practice Can Change Your Life – Gabrielle Bernstein

Davidson’s pillars, you’ll notice, are broader characteristics of a person’s way-of-being in the world, not a measure of how often a person can recall feeling something they’d call happy. Responses might have looked different if the Million Women Study researchers had asked questions like: “I am satisfied with my life” with the option to select “1=Strongly disagree” to “7=Strongly agree,” or “Some people are generally very happy. They enjoy life regardless of what is going on, getting the most out of everything. To what extent does this characterization describe you?”—from “1= not at all” to “7=a great deal.”

These are, in fact, questions selected from Ed Deiner’s Satisfaction With Life Scale, and happiness expert Sonja Lyubomirsky’s Subjective Happiness Scale; both of these research-validated scales have been shown to predict longevity in populations from all over the world in various states of illness and health.

There’s another issue with the questions that Diener, Lyubomirsky, and Sarah D. Pressman highlighted yesterday in an op-ed for the LA Times:

The happiness question was the 306th item in a 316-item survey. After answering so many questions about medications, diet and health history, a respondent might be a lot less happy than when she started, and a lot less cooperative. In fact, about 400,000 women in the Million Women Study apparently quit before reaching this question.

This fact considerably weakens the authority of the study’s conclusions about happiness!

READ THE REST OF THIS ARTICLE…




Use These 5 Effective Antidotes to Worry — and Be Happy!

be happy

By Sandra Pawula | Always Well Within

Do you worry a lot?  I used to be a big worrier.  For example, I would be on pins and needles whenever my husband flew until he touched down safely.

Eventually, I realized:  Worry never helps, it only harms me.

Since that “aha” moment, I worry far less.  I can’t say I’ve extinguished worry entirely, but it’s no longer such a prominent force in my life.

Related Article: How To Stop Worrying and Start Living

According to WebMD:

When worries and anxiety become excessive, chances are you’ll trigger the stress response.

In addition to stressing you out, chronic worry can make you physically ill.  Repeatedly turning on the fear, flight, fight stress system in your body can contribute to annoying symptoms like headaches and even serious health problems like immune suppression, digestive disorders, and heart disease.

Let’s take a look at how to release worry because each time you let go of worry, life becomes more spacious and free.

5 Antidotes to Worry

Check out these 5 antidotes to worry and see which ones resonates for you.

Related Article: Why Worrying is Counterproductive and How to Lighten Up

1. This Isn’t Happening Right Now

Worry usually means you’re in a thought of the the past or future.  So when a worry thought or feeling arises, remind yourself this isn’t happening right now.  It’s just a thought moving through your mind.

Embrace Shantideva’s advice:

If the problem can be solved why worry?  If the problem cannot be solved worrying will do you no good.

In other words, if there’s a solution, take action.  If not, let go.

2. Change the Channel

When your mind drifts to worry, use your senses to help bring yourself into the present moment.  Notice what you see, hear, feel (physical sensations), smell or taste right now.  For example, “I see a yellow wall and hear birds chirping and a weed whacker in the background.”

Related Article: What If You Had Nothing To Worry About?

You don’t need to announce it to yourself.  Just be aware of what your senses are receiving, and rest in that awareness without creating thoughts about it.  If thoughts do arise, don’t chastise yourself.  Just let them go and return your attention to your senses.

This is a simple form of mindfulness practice.

3. Use An Affirmation

Create an affirmation to replace the worry thought.  Craft one that goes to the core of your fear.  For example, “I feel safe.”  Or “I have everything I need in this moment.”  Then, whenever the worry thought comes, immediately apply the affirmation in its place.

READ THE REST OF THIS ARTICLE…




10 Daily Habits That Will Age You Faster

By Livvi Hess | The Alternative Daily

older men better in bed older couple

Picture yourself five, ten, twenty years from now. Will you be vibrant, strong and aging gracefully? Or will you be degrading fast and looking older than you are?

It’s important to realize that the choice is in your hands. Since getting older is an extremely slow and gradual process that is happening by the minute, it’s those little habits that we do every day that can determine how healthy and happy we will be down the road.

Luckily, the choices and habits that promote wellness as we age are also great ways to take care of yourself now. It’s never too late to slow down the clock by embracing a healthier lifestyle. Here are the top 10 daily habits to avoid if you want to stay “young for your age.”

Indulging too often

If you usually say yes to dessert and other treats, such as pastries and candy bars, you may find yourself aging prematurely. Not only does sugar cause widespread inflammation in the body that can lead to disease, it also directly affects appearance. Sugar molecules initiate a biochemical process called glycation, which leaves you looking tired, puffy and wrinkled.

Let’s not forget that consistently giving in to temptation (i.e., reaching for the donuts when you promised yourself you wouldn’t) can also result in a loss of confidence and self-trust. Being unwavering in your resolve to eat healthily will help you achieve more of what you want, leading to a happier more youthful future.

Related Article: 10 Anti-Aging Supplements that Will Keep You Looking & Feeling Younger

Skimping on sleep

Those who say “I’ll sleep when I’m dead” may in fact find themselves there sooner. Scientific studies have clearly shown that sleeping less than seven hours per night on a regular basis can shorten your life, not to mention leave you mentally sluggish and overweight.

The healing and detoxification processes that occur during sleep are vital for a strong, resilient mind and body. For example, the “sleep hormone” melatonin contributes to cellular repair which wards off cancer. The human growth hormone (HGH) is also produced during sleep, which gives us good muscle tone and youthful vitality.

Exercising only because of guilt

Do you schlep to the gym and slog on the treadmill only when you want to lose weight? While any exercise is clearly better than none at all, the guilt-based model reflects an attitude that could be aging you.

People who stay healthy later into life often have physical fitness, strength and balance to thank. It’s important to take pleasure in moving your body and to enjoy the rush of blood, sweat and endorphins that comes along with it. Make exercise an enjoyable ritual, rather than a dreaded punishment.

Not taking proper care of yourself    

When was the last time you took care of — not your dog, not the house, not the kids, not your boss, not your partner — but yourself. Even for half an hour, or perhaps a whole evening? While this sounds impossible to many of us, the fact is, no one is ever going to make the time for you. It’s something you must do for yourself, and it’s an important way to prevent premature aging.

Start by establishing small “me-time” rituals throughout the day, even if it’s just a quick journal entry before bed, or a walk around the block in the morning. These small self-love gestures go a long way toward life satisfaction and ultimately long-term wellness.

Related Article: Ashwagandha Reduces Stress and Aging While Boosting Your Immunity (Includes Dosage Recommendation)

Using alcohol as stress-relief

While a sociable glass of wine a couple of times a week is certainly not an issue, using alcohol as an escape from daily troubles might be making you old before your time. Not only because of the physical effects of the alcohol (like inflammation and a slower metabolism), but also because this indicates issues are being left unresolved and trapped inside.

Read the rest of the article…




Plants Release Animal-like Substance When Stressed

By Jennifer Viegas | Discovery

plant

Although plants do not have nervous systems, they respond to stress with chemical and electrical signals that are remarkably similar to those of animals, a new study has found.

The findings, published in the journal Nature Communications, could help to explain why certain plant-derived drugs work so well in humans.

At the center of it all is the neurotransmitter GABA (gamma-aminobutyric acid), which humans and animals, as well as plants, release when they are stressed out.

“We’ve known for a long time that the animal neurotransmitter GABA is produced by plants under stress, for example, when they encounter drought, salinity, viruses, acidic soils or extreme temperatures, but it was not known whether GABA was a signal in plants,” senior author Matthew Gilliham of the University of Adelaide’s School of Agriculture, Food and Wine said in a press release.

He continued, “We’ve discovered that plants bind GABA in a similar way to animals, resulting in electrical signals that ultimately regulate plant growth when a plant is exposed to a stressful environment.”

Co-author Stephen Tyerman is optimistic that the discovery could lead to new ways of modifying how plants respond to stress. He explained that most yield losses from agricultural crops come from “major stresses” like pathogens and poor environmental conditions. If the plants succumb to these threats, food shortages may result.

Tyerman further explained that by “identifying how plants use GABA as a stress signal, we have a new tool to help in the global effort to breed more stress-resilient crops to fight food insecurity.”

The researchers suspect that GABA and its interaction with neurotransmitters evolved independently in the plant and animal kingdoms. This is because, while the proteins share many characteristics in common, some aspects of these same proteins are different between plants and animals.

Nevertheless, since the basic GABA signaling system exists within both groups, particular plant-derived drugs and other plant-based products often match well with our health needs. For example, chamomile is thought to bind to GABA receptors, acting as an inhibitory neurotransmitter. As a probable result, this natural ingredient tends to provide a gentle, natural feeling of calmness when consumed.

[Read more here]

Robert O'Leary 150x150Robert O’Leary, JD BARA, has had an abiding interest in alternative health products & modalities since the early 1970’s & he has seen how they have made people go from lacking health to vibrant health. He became an attorney, singer-songwriter, martial artist & father along the way and brings that experience to his practice as a BioAcoustic Soundhealth Practitioner, under the tutelage of the award-winning founder of BioAcoustic Biology, Sharry Edwards, whose Institute of BioAcoustic Biology has now been serving clients for 30 years with a non-invasive & safe integrative modality that supports the body’s ability to self-heal using the power of the human voice. Robert brings this modality to serve clients in Greater Springfield (MA), New England & “virtually” the world, with his website, www.romayasoundhealthandbeauty.com. He can also be reached at romayasoundhealth andbeauty@gmail.com.