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Feel Anxious? Sad? Angry? Shift to a Positive Perspective

I was recently asked what people can do to survive the current weird environment.  This query continued:  “We really need to shift our reality away from negativity and fear.  It’s funny because as I type this you are saying in the background on YouTube, ask the good questions.” 

When we feel we’re in a weird environment, full of negativity and fear, we can shift to a positive perspective.  We can take a deep breath, acknowledge the vastness of the Cosmos, and our connection to it, and we can raise our level of consciousness to a higher dimension.  Through this raising of consciousness we can experience sadness transform into vulnerability; anxiety transform into caring; and anger transform into assertiveness.

Your Ongoing Conversation with the Cosmos

Our questions matter a great deal more than most of us consciously realize.  Most every mentally focused, heart-centered, passionately inspired thought and question–even those thought ‘privately’ to ourselves are in actuality one side of an on-going conversation we are engaged in every day of our lives.

This concept garnered some respect when introduced by physicist John Archibald Wheeler, who emphasized that we live in a participatory universe:

“We are not only observers. 
We are participators. 
In some strange sense,
this is a participatory universe.”
    — John Archibald Wheeler

This concept is wonderful, because it provides us with a basis by which we can be scientists, conducting personal experiments in our own lives.  I suggest for best results to start by paying attention to how you are feeling.

On days when your Qi (internal energy) is high, such as when you are in love, or have meditated, exercised, or spent a beautiful day in nature, you may notice that some thoughts seem to instantly manifest in physical reality.

When we’re not feeling strong energy, there are some things we can do to pull ourselves up by the proverbial bootstraps.

The Observer’s Perspective Effect

The so-called “Observer Effect” in quantum physics refers to the principle by which the very act of taking observational measurements in an experiment such as the famous Double Slit Experiment have the effect of determining what will subsequently be observed.

We can thus shift reality by shifting our perspective.  This is a brilliant strategy for virtually any situation that we apparently have no control over.  Obviously, with regard to situations we can influence, we can start creating a to-do list and set reasonable goals that we feel fairly certain we can attain.  But for everything we have minimal or no ability to influence, the absolutely best thing we can do is to adjust our perspective–and change our attitude.  At such a juncture, it’s often helpful to remember that there is a great deal that is bigger than us–and we can trust and have faith that the cosmos was here before we were born, and the cosmos will exist long after we’re gone.

Sometimes we feel temporarily mired in emotional “stuff”–such as feelings of great sadness, tremendous anxiety, or outrage and anger.  When we know that we can take a few steps back and observe ourselves having these emotions, we can begin to pull ourselves out of whatever drama we’re feeling tempted to participate in:  we can become positive observers.

Breathe Slowly and Deeply

One of the simplest ways to lift above feelings of despair, anxiety, and anger is to take some slow, deep, steady breaths.  Inhale with a full, deep, slow breath–and then exhale even more slowly than you just breathed in.  Bring your attention to knowing that in this moment of space and time, you are OK.  Keep breathing slowly and deeply.

Connect with Cosmic Mind

While still breathing slowly and deeply, bring your awareness to the idea that the Cosmos was here long before you arrived in the form you now occupy.  Keep breathing slowly, deeply, and fully and envision that all you really ever need to do is show up in life, and do the best you can for yourself and others.  The Cosmos can do the ‘heavy lifting’ of coordinating all the reality shifts and miracles that may feel completely out of our control.

Become a Positive Observer

It sometimes helps to notice how other people can get caught up in dramas.  People who are feeling constantly sad and downtrodden can seem to be playing the role of Victim; those who seem chronically anxious often play the role of Rescuer; and those who are angry and full of outrage can often (and quite inadvertently) end up playing the role of Persecutor.

When we find ourselves wallowing in seemingly endless sadness, anxiety, or anger we can recognize we might have stepped into some drama ‘quicksand.’  At this stage of awareness, it’s easy for us to come up with all sorts of rationales and reasons why it’s imperative that we must stay ___________ ( depressed / anxious / outraged ), because ___________.  When we raise our level of consciousness by stepping back and observing ourselves, we will notice that those stuck feelings are not actually either necessary nor optimal functioning modes.

As we lift out of lower-vibe emotions, we can move for example, from sadness into vulnerability.  We can move from anxiety into caring.  We can move from anger into assertiveness.  The first step toward becoming positive observers is learning to observe what we are thinking and how we are feeling from a perspective of kindness and unconditional love.  There is value in gaining a higher-order viewpoint, in much the same way that you could easily find a hidden character such as Waldo hiding in a two dimensional ‘flatland’ floor plan.  With the advantage of our three-dimensional observational abilities, we do not need to wander around inside that ‘flatland’ floor plan, but instead can instantly see at a glance where Waldo is hiding.

Raising our level of consciousness grants us the ability to see the bigger picture–that our thoughts and feelings do not define us, but rather are passing through, much like clouds in the sky.   It grants us the ability to rise out of sadness to vulnerability; out of anxiety to caring; and out of anger into assertiveness.

Honoring this shift to positive perspective, we can remember to keep asking, “How good can it get?”

.  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .

And I invite you to watch the companion video to this blog at:

___________________________

QuantumJumps300x150adCynthia Sue Larson is the best-selling author of six books, including Quantum Jumps.  Cynthia has a degree in physics from UC Berkeley, an MBA degree, a Doctor of Divinity, and a second degree black belt in Kuk Sool Won. Cynthia is the founder of RealityShifters, and is president of the International Mandela Effect Conference. Cynthia hosts “Living the Quantum Dream” on the DreamVisions7 radio network, and has been featured in numerous shows including Gaia, the History Channel, Coast to Coast AM, One World with Deepak Chopra, and BBC. Cynthia reminds us to ask in every situation, “How good can it get?” Subscribe to her free monthly ezine at:
RealityShifters



Non-fiction Book “The Faces of the Self: Introspective Insights” now Available for Free

The Faces of the Self: Introspective Insights

Quintessentially, I am a thinker, an introspective ambivert and an explorer of the unknown. I wish to be a seeker of the infinite and a Renaissance woman. Ever since I was a kid, I’ve wanted to write. I wrote my first poem at the age of 9 entitled “Dolls and Toys”, and since then I’ve continued my writing odyssey.  I write because it comes to me naturally. I write because I am, and love to ink my thoughts on paper. I think, therefore I ink. Writing for me is a cathartic process, a spiritual journey, nourishment and contentment for my soul.

I never knew I’d become a psychologist. I wanted to become a geographer or a writer back in school. Then serendipitously I choose Psychology, English Literature and Economics during my under graduation at Mount Carmel College, and somehow I found more psychological proximity with Psychology and I went on to do an MSc. in Clinical Psychology. My love for foreign languages is unstoppable. So, after my Master’s, I did a Diploma in French at Alliance Française de Bangalore –which is like my cozy second home. Now as a doctoral student of Cognitive Psychology at Jain University, which staunchly believes in and encourages interdisciplinarity in research, I believe that my aspiration to become a Renaissance woman has just found its inception. I believe in treating all fields of knowledge equally, because every discipline is intertwined with several others in sophisticated fashion. There is mathematics in poetry, there is psychology in history, there is quantum physics in neuroscience, and so on and so forth. Those who have their heart in the right place will not look down upon any field of knowledge and put others on a pedestal, like putting software engineers on a pedestal, which is like a cognitive epidemic in India. All fields of knowledge are essentially equal and interrelated. . We must learn to adopt multidisciplinary, interdisciplinary and transdisciplinary approaches to learning. Learning must not be limited to one domain, and we must all strive to be polymaths.

“Our task is to learn, to become God-like through knowledge… By knowledge we approach God, and then we can rest,” as Brian Weiss said in his bestselling book “Many Lives, Many Masters.”

The book entitled “The Faces of the Self: Introspective Insights” is partially based on my own introspection, deep thinking, reflections and mulling over the state of being and the state of the world. The ‘faces’ of the self refer to the various façades adorned by the individual. Here face does not just point to the face value of the term. It is synonymous with the words mask, veneer, personas and different lenses worn by the person in viewing and experiencing the world. In the context of my book, these ‘faces’ are aspects of the human personality, responses to environmental stimuli, containing biases, stereotypical notions and mental sets, among others. By the words ‘the faces of the self’ I’m not referring to the psychological disorder called Dissociative Identity Disorder, a condition in which different alter egos exist in one distressed client.

The subtitle of the book, that is, ‘introspective insights’ is of relevance due to the role of my introspection, intuition and insights obtained in the writing of this book. In the field of Psychology, Introspection is conscious examination or observation of one’s own cognitive, conative and affective processes. This book is about looking at the world through the inner eye. How we see the world is dependent on a number of factors ranging from socio-economic background, upbringing to life experiences. The way we see the world is somewhat linked to our life script and each person has his/her own “logic bubble”, a term coined by the Father of Lateral Thinking –Edward de Bono.

There can be ‘n’ number of faces for the self. In this book, I speak about the faces relevant to me as an individual. Some of them include the conditioned self, the transpersonal self, and the philosophical self, among others. It also contains a few chapters what reality is and what we make of it. Essentially the book contains a considerable quantum of my own musings. Certain chapters were actually meant for journals, but which didn’t exactly fit those journals’ ‘toolboxes’. Hence I realized that it could well be what fits into the theme of my book. Some chapters are my cognitive ramblings, whereas others seem to be more jargonized. Jargon has been used wherever necessary. It is meant for a cross-disciplinary audience, since it contains a somewhat balanced blend of psychology, quantum physics, spirituality, and philosophical viewpoints.

I have tried to target a cross-disciplinary audience throughout the book, and I would to hear suggestions to be incorporated into my second non-fiction book. I have plans to write a romance novel, a detective novel, an anthology of short stories, a psychological thriller, a book of English poetry, a book of French poetry and a science fiction novel in the near future.

Here’s the official Conscious Life News PDF of my book which you can now access for free!

https://consciouslifenews.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/08/THE-FACES-OF-THE-SELF-INTROSPECTIVE-INSIGHTS.pdf

 

Feel free to email me your feedback on the book at samy.samhita@gmail.com

 

About the Author

Samhita K is third year PhD scholar of Cognitive Psychology, Indian Psychology, Indigenous Psychology and Transpersonal Psychology at Jain University. Her thesis work is on Mind Wandering. She is a published poet, writer, English and French teacher, researcher, and psychologist. Samhita is the author of the book “The Faces of the Self: Introspective Insights”, published in 2018 which has received a blurb from award-winning Indian writer Usha K. R. She is a musicophile, Francophile and Russophile. She is a seeker of spirituality and is deeply passionate about Transpersonal Psychology. She is the author of the short story “The Russian Manuscript” and has also authored “The Return of the Russian Manuscript” available on Amazon. Samhita has been the Featured Poet at a cafe called Urban Solace Cafe for the Soul, which was the 262nd edition of the Longest Running Poetry Event in India. This event is also featured in the Limca Book of World Records. In July 2019, Samhita participated in creating a World Record at The Institute of Biosensory Psychology, Saint Petersburg, Russia, by being a part of the largest number of people who learnt telekinesis in the shortest period of time.

Her hobbies include reading, creative writing, journalling, music, sports, and mindfulness meditation. You can follow her on Instagram on two usernames namely, samy.samhita and thefacesoftheself. Her email address is: samy.samhita@gmail.com

 




I Just Learned I Died in Another Reality

One of the most astonishing types of reality shifts is the phenomenon in which someone dies and is witnessed alive again.  And without a doubt, the most stunning type of Alive Again experience is one in which you yourself are the person that people heard had died–and this year was the first time I heard from someone reporting that I had died.

I’ve researched numerous cases of people being reported dead, only later to be witnessed very much alive, with one of the earliest reports being that of the actor Larry Hagman, who was an actor in the TV show, “Dynasty.”  I include that one in my book, Reality Shifts: When Consciousness Changes the Physical World, as well as my experience seeing my roommate’s dead cat very much alive again.

Ashes in 1983

My first Alive Again experience occurred in the 1980’s when my neighbor’s cat, Ashes, was run over by a car and killed… only to appear in my backyard a couple of weeks later!  I was flabbergasted, to say the least.  My husband reacted normally at first to seeing the cat, until I reminded him, “Ashes DIED a couple of weeks ago!”

My husband rubbed his chin and recalled more details, without any prompts from me.  “Oh, yeah… he was hit by a car, wasn’t he?”  I spent an hour petting and talking with Ashes, since I never thought I’d see him again after he’d died.  He had previously kept himself immaculately groomed (prior to being alive again), and he was a bit scruffier and greasier, as if he’d suddenly become a bit arthritic, and now had trouble washing himself and keeping his fur as fluffy and attractive as he had before.

I’d heard from my roommate that Ashes had died, after having been hit by a car, when I’d asked her where he was.  I had been living in the same house with that roommate, Kathryn, and her cat Ashes, for many years, and then had moved directly across the street, where I’d been delighted to continue getting to visit with Ashes most every day.  It occurs to me that having a bit of distance between my old apartment where I’d lived in the same house with Ashes, and my new apartment across the street may have provided just enough of a gap by which I could experience Kathryn telling me why I was no longer seeing Ashes come to visit in my garden–and then a couple of weeks later, be astonished to see Ashes alive again!

How I Received News of My Death

Imagine my surprise when I received an email this past month from someone named Steve, who said he had a very unusual experience that he wanted to share with me:

Hi Cynthia,

I have an unusual story to tell you in regard to the Mandela Effect. My name is Steve Boucher and I’m from St.Catharines, Ontario.  I’m 63.  I have had several occurrences of the Mandela Effect in my life over the years, but none like the most recent one.  I watched your interview with Regina Meredith on Gaia TV and have been a fan of your work for a while now.  Shortly after the interview with Regina, I decided to visit your Facebook page to learn more.  Upon arriving at your Facebook page, I was greeted with a message from your husband stating that he regretted to inform us that you had passed away and that you had been ill for quite a while.  I was shocked to read this news and immediately responded offering my condolences.  I remember feeling this great sadness come over me, as I had very much enjoyed your work.

A month or so later, I noticed a new video of yours on YouTube and was amazed to see that it was a recent video.  Then I started to notice more recent videos popping up on YouTube. It didn’t take me long to realize that you were still alive!  I realized then, that I must have shifted to a different timeline in which you had not passed away.  I knew then, that I had to write to you and tell you this story, as strange as it sounds.  I am grateful to have shifted to a timeline in which you are alive and continuing to bring videos to the public about the Mandela Effect and time shifting.  Hope you don’t think I’m crazy. I just had to tell you.

My response to Steve’s email was:

Wow–that is a DOOZY of a reality shift!  I am so glad you and I are both today in a reality where I am alive and well–and no, I don’t think you’re crazy.  This is the first time I’ve heard from someone reporting that they’d seen believable evidence that I’d died, and then seen me alive again, yet it does bring to mind another related type of reality shift. I’ve heard from people who tell me that they are certain I did not exist previously in their experienced realities, since if I did, they would surely have come across my website and YouTube videos, yet I had not.

I’ve been interviewed twice now by Regina Meredith for GaiaTV, most recently with a show about high energy money that aired in early 2019.  Since you are writing to me about this matter this year in 2019, am I correct in surmising that my death after long illness that you experienced was this year, in 2019?  I’m also curious if you recall any other details.

I then received Steve’s response in reply:

I don’t think I’ve seen the new high energy money video with Regina yet. I think this was shortly after the previous video you did with her. Although, it was in 2019 that I noticed this. I find in most of my observations of the Mandela Effect,  often the memories are a little obscured. Sometimes it is difficult to clearly remember specific details. Another thing I have noticed, is that a certain number of the instances seem to center around the death of a person. I’ve also noticed that when these types of incidents occur, people associated with the event, seem to disappear and become very difficult to track down to ask them how they remember it. It’s almost as though when there is a reality shift, especially if it relates to a death, all the loose ends relating to the old timeline are mysteriously tied up, making it almost impossible to get confirmation. Have you noticed this? It’s almost as if there is some kind of intelligence cleaning up any evidence that things were different before the shift occurred.

After receiving Steve’s emails, I went back to see when that first interview I did with Regina Meredith aired, and it looks like that it was originally planned to be released in mid-November 2016, but going back to check some of my notes, it looks like it likely aired in one of the first days of January 2017.  At that time, I had been publishing YouTube videos each month until I became very sick with a respiratory infection starting in December 2016, and thus there is a gap of several months between my YouTube video of November 23, 2016, Mandela Effect VS Manifestation (before I got very sick) and the next one I did, Many Possible Realities and Mandela Effect, on April 3, 2017, once I was feeling well enough to get back into creating videos.  I had been so ill in December 2016 that I commented to just a few closest friends and family that I felt I’d been close to death.

How it Feels to be ‘Alive Again’

I have a clear sense that I’ve experienced Divine Love and Divine Grace.  During the time I had been so ill, I was aware of the fragility of life.  Realizing that I’m now in a unique position to know how it feels to be Alive Again, my first emotional responses are of great gratitude and thanks, with a sense of reverence.  I have renewed my personal commitment to keep a pure heart, making a daily meditative and prayerful practice of requesting assistance from God / Divine Source to purify my heart and keep it pure, so that all I feel in my heart is a sense of Divine Love and Joy.

To me, this incident is a great deal bigger than most all the other types of reality shifts I report in the monthly RealityShifters ezine.  And I feel very grateful to Steve and all others who felt I might die and had an adverse emotional reaction to that possibility.  I know of two other friends who, in addition to Steve, also were aware that I might almost die at that time, about two years ago.

One thing I’ve noticed when having a “No!” reaction to hearing news of someone’s death, to be followed later by them being alive again is that it’s entirely possible that people connected through collective consciousness are making a kind of vote on the matter.  I thus was especially grateful to hear news that some people were alive again after I’d heard reports of their death, including:  Larry Hagman, Jane Goodall, and Benicio del Toro–and my roommate’s cat, Ashes.  While not everyone I hear of dying subsequently is alive again, I’m just grateful for those that I have experienced being alive again so far in my life.  The reason I attribute such shared awareness and “No!” votes to altering reality is that I witnessed a similar effect once in my household when our beloved elderly family dog appeared to be getting cataracts.  I noticed this on my own one day, and emotionally felt, “No! This can’t be happening to our dear dog!” and almost immediately, his eyes looked bright and clear. Then my daughter told me one day, “Bad news about the dog.”  I immediately inquired, “Is it about his eyes?” and replied that, “It sometimes looks like he’s getting cataracts, but then we can feel we don’t wish that to occur, and it reverses out.”  A similar discussion then followed with my husband, and after that, none of us ever witnessed our dog’s eyes clouding over again.

Because I’ve witnessed the benefit of shared collective consciousness assisting the wellbeing of others (such as my family with our dog’s vision), I am now feeling grateful to all those who would not wish me to have died.

Mandela Effects Go Far Back in Time

In Steve’s correspondence with me related to my being Alive Again, he raised the subject of changes to the Bible, going back thousands of years.  Steve wrote:

There is one Mandela Effect that completely baffles me. It is perhaps the oldest one discovered. It would be the biblical scripture of Isaiah 11:6. I was raised as a Christian and have a strong Christian background. I left the church and abandoned Christianity over a decade ago, after reading some books by author Bart D. Ehrman on the origins of Christianity and the bible. But, that’s another story. The scripture found in Isaiah 11:6 has changed.  I remember it reading that ‘the lion will lie down with the lamb.’  Now, it reads, ‘the wolf also shall dwell with the lamb, and the leopard shall lie down with the kid…’ I knew that scripture well, so much so that I did a pastel painting of the scene once, with a lion lying down with a lamb.  Ask anyone who knows the Bible well, and they will tell you that it was the ‘lion’ that lied down with the lamb, not the wolf.

I have looked up that scripture in many different versions of the bible and they all say the wolf will dwell with the lamb now.  Even the oldest bibles now say this. I have a very old one that is falling apart.  I bought it because the illustrations in it were done by Gustav Dore, who is one of my favorite artists.  It reads the same way. This shows that the Mandela Effect can actually be retroactive, changing thousands of years of history.  The implications of this are staggering.

Isaiah 11:6 (KJV)
The wolf also shall dwell with the lamb, and the leopard shall lie down with the kid; and the calf and the young lion and the fatling together; and a little child shall lead them.

The passage above is one of the most well known and most quoted verses in the Bible yet some claim that this is correct. It is not! This verse should read, “The lion shall lie down with the lamb…”

It makes me wonder about time travel. Could it have been possible for someone to have gone back in time and influenced Isaiah to write the scripture differently? This is one possibility that might explain how something like this could change history and have a ripple effect that could completely rewrite history and many would never be aware of it.

I also recall the Bible passage about the lion laying down with the lamb, and recall having heard it exclusively mentioned that way, with no mention about a wolf lying down with the lamb.  I know of an artist, Kimberly-Lynn Hanson, who recently had a Mandela effect gallery showing in which she invites viewers to consider how some Mandela effects may be ‘closer to truth.’  These are presented like brain-teaser puzzles, and now that way of viewing Mandela effects has me wondering how it might be possible that a “wolf lying down with the lamb” might be closer to truth.  When I think about this particular example, the first thing that comes to my mind is that wolves and lambs have often historically been found living closer together than lions and lambs.  Lions are native to Africa, and their natural prey has historically consisted of wild animals such as gazelles, rather than tame farm animals such as sheep.

There appears to be no limit on how far back in time Mandela effects are capable of going, and this could go a long way to helping explain how our universe is so amazingly off-the-charts unlikely to have come into being ‘accidentally’ or ‘randomly.’  With such a built in collective consciousness ‘voting’ mechanism as reality shifts and Mandela effects seem to provide, we begin to get a sense of how there truly is a hidden order of intrinsic goodness and consciousness operating everywhere, and every-when.

So yes, I do believe it’s possible that the Bible can now have been written differently–and just about everything that’s so far occurred can also have been done differently.  I include a section near the beginning of my book, Quantum Jumps, about how our appreciation and understanding of quantum logic and how quantum jumps can and do occur is about to transform every field of study–including medicine and our courts of law, and not just constrained to various fields of science.  We already witness that there have been sudden shifts in the evolutionary stages of plants and animals–and to me, quantum jumps helps explain the otherwise inexplicable typical lack of ‘missing links’ along the evolutionary trails.  Scientists have even witnessed in laboratory settings that, for example, lactose-intolerant bacteria have mutated in a single generation to suddenly, inexplicably, be able to digest lactose when that was their only source of food in their petri dish environments.

The clues that there might exist a science of miracles has been with us literally for millions of years–yet thanks to quantum physics, we are only just now beginning to fully appreciate what this actually means, and how it might really work.

Dr. Yasunori Nomura with Cynthia Sue Larson

Alive Again and Suddenly Appearing

Equally intriguing to me and possibly very related to these Alive Again reality shift experiences are those in which people seem to pop out of nowhere.  I noticed that physicist Dr. Yasunori Nomura definitely didn’t exist in my realities at the time I was researching and writing my book, “Quantum Jumps” in 2013, since I would have found his research papers and published works in the fields I was investigating, right alongside his colleague, Raphael Bousso, whose work I do cite in Quantum Jumps.  I was able to tell Dr. Nomura this in person when I met him to chat and have tea after seeing him at a showing of the 2013 film, “Particle Fever” at UC Berkeley in 2014, and Yasunori seemed to appreciate the possibility that these sorts of macro-scale quantum events really can and do happen, and such might be the case with his sudden existence in my realities.  I have been told by several people, starting around late 2010 that they were absolutely 100% certain I didn’t use to exist in their realities prior to that time, since they definitely would have heard of me and my website and books and research–which at that point in time had been around for a decade.

I invite you to watch the companion video to this blog post at:

 

___________________________

QuantumJumps300x150adCynthia Sue Larson is the best-selling author of six books, including Quantum Jumps. Cynthia has a degree in Physics from UC Berkeley, and discusses consciousness and quantum physics on numerous shows including the History Channel, Gaia TV, Coast to Coast AM, the BBC and One World with Deepak Chopra and on the Living the Quantum Dream show she hosts. You can subscribe to Cynthia’s free monthly ezine at: https://www.RealityShifters.com
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Dr. Joe Dispenza: How to Rewire Your Brain For a Better Healthier You [VIDEO]

Image Source.

By Justin Deschamps | Stillness in the Storm

Consciousness is the image-generating, experience-processing, meaning-exploring aspect of being. Awareness funnels through the pathways of the body and mind forming structures of a physical and metaphysical nature, such as sensations, feelings, and meanings. Through the principle of reflectivity or correspondence, what is experienced with the physical body is mirrored as sensations in the hindbrain or reptilian neurology. This forms the raw data set needed by the emotive mind and limbic brain to produce emotions and feelings. The forebrain or the neocortex is where abstract and intellectual thought, as well as internal image generation and processing, takes place.

The three brain centers act like a triune network of biological computers, processing external and internal stimuli, generating emotions and meanings. Understanding how this inner and outer flow of information shapes what we experience is essential so as to reclaim control over the physical body and its systems. The conductor of the body and its reflectivity mechanisms, when not properly balanced and harmonized, creates a cacophony instead of a symphony. Thus, in order to “rewire” your brain for compassion—or anything else—one must learn and use the power of intention to imagine ourselves doing the things we aspire to do, filling these images with detail and emotion that imprints on to the biological system, forming new habits and programs of behavior.

In the following Ted Talk, Dr. Joe Dispenza reveals how data is processed and stored in the physical body by way of the three-brain system. He details how it is possible to be overwhelmed by past programming as well has what can be done to change for the better. The techniques are simple but require dedication and persistence—repeating the process over and over again. The more completely one focuses on the inner work of changing their consciousness the more readily the body accepts the new programming.

Related Article: First Human Injected with Controversial Genetically Modified Genes

The Flow of Information from Within and Without

Stimulation can come from within or without. Physical sensations received by the body’s various sensory systems, like the smell receptors in the nose, or touch receptors on the skin, flow through the central nervous system into the hindbrain for image processing. This is where reflex responses originate—after a behavior has been repeated many times, the conscious mind is no longer needed to set it into motion. This can be beneficial when performing repeated tasks or training the body to do things like walk, run, play an instrument or type on a computer. This way, when a situation is encountered that we’ve already developed a skill to deal with, the body can spring into action automatically. However, what if there are behaviors we don’t want to continue, but we’ve repeated for one reason or another—like fingernail biting? The ability to train and re-write the automatic brain, the storehouse of our acquired subconscious skills, is what is needed to gain freedom from habits that no longer serve.

The limbic brain is responsible for creating emotional images and feelings that represent a type of homogenized imprint of an internal or external data set. That is to say, if we burned our hand on a hot stove at some point in our lives, just seeing a hot oven again might trigger an emotional response of anxiety—an example of external emotional stimulation. Internal stimulation comes from the inner imaging center of the neocortex, where imagination takes flight. If someone is describing an experience of burning their hand on a stove, this would be imagined in the forebrain and that image triggers an emotional response. Thus, emotive responses can be formed from either inner or outer stimuli. And just like a reflex, these images can produce automated responses in the hindbrain, an extreme example of which is Post Traumatic Stress Disorder, wherein an inner (or outer) stimulus triggers a crippling fear response.

Related Article: How To Access Your Psychic Ability to Read Minds

The neocortex or forebrain is where the conscious mind and free will are the most powerful. It is in the conscious mind where the work of rewiring is done. Here is where meanings, impressions, insights and intuitions are received and examined, and subsequent reactions are produced. The conscious mind is where images can be conjured via an act of will, where we can invoke new states of consciousness that imprint onto the other brain centers, literally rewiring the storehouse of automated responses.

As Dr. Dispenza shows in the below video, when we visualize how we want to react to a situation, and make that image as complete and detailed as possible, neural patterns in the brain are altered. The more we practice this technique the more efficient it becomes, and eventually almost everything can be re-written. That feeling of disgust when smelling something unpleasant can become a feeling of appreciation. That anxiety when facing a situation we fear can become a feeling of excitement to explore the unknown. That hatred we feel for someone who hurt us in the past can be transformed into compassion and forgiveness. In doing so, the body becomes a transmitter of coherent energy, wherein the indwelling consciousness feels more at ease and empowered, and the outer world is organized and uplifted.

Dr. Dispenza says that when done properly, a person can use their emotional processes to retrain the body using the power of epigenetics. This is done by holding a coherent or well-defined image within the mind so that it produces an emotional response. That response will translate into a biochemical soup that flows through the body, altering the conditions around a cell such that an alteration of one’s genetic expression takes place. Not only can emotional healing and empowerment take place, but severe diseases such as cancer can be affected and even cured. The same principle is at work with energetic techniques like Neuro-Linguistic Programing and Emotional Freedom Technique.

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Whether one is seeking to simply heal past trauma, live a happier life, or become a powerful healing force for stabilizing energy fields of others and the Earth, rewiring one’s biology for positive states of being—coherently organized and energetically balanced—is an essential skill to learn.

This article (Dr. Joe Dispenza: How to Rewire Your Brain For a Better Healthier You) originally appeared on StillnessintheStorm.com and is free and open source. You have permission to share or republish this article in full so long as attribution to the author and stillnessinthestorm.com are provided. If you spot a typo, email sitsshow@gmail.com.

About the Author Justin Deschamps

I was born in Portland Maine, and grew up in the Boston area. As a Physics, Psychology and Spirituality student, I have been searching for truth all my life, looking to make sense of all the insanity in this world. In that time, I have developed a holistic body of knowledge linking science, philosophy and spirituality into a single framework of ever expanding understanding. I want to share what I have with the world, becoming teacher to some and student to all others. My goal is to help myself and others become better truth seekers, and with the wisdom gained in the process, make this planet the paradise it was meant to be. I am just happy to give back to a world and universe I have received so much from.




Practice Compassion in a Chaotic World with NVC

 

Thanks to the internet and all our various portable, interconnected devices, we can now be in nearly constant communication with people near and far.  Such communication can be nurturing, empowering and inspirational–but at times it can also feel like being part of a disfunctional, dissociated family with all manner of divisions, schisms, and negative emotions swirling around.  The resulting severed relationships can erupt in many types of violence, sometimes with truly heartbreaking results.

One of the ways we can experience more positive attributes of our newfound interconnectedness and fewer unpleasant aspects is by practicing and embodying compassion in our daily lives with everyone we converse with.  With each of us doing the best we personally can to envision and take steps into creating a more compassionate, nonviolent world, this dream can become a reality.

How can we achieve such a dream, you may ask?  Fortunately, there are tools we can learn to use to bring nonviolent communication (NVC), also called compassionate communication or collaborative communication, into our lives.  Marshall Rosenberg formed NVC theory based on the foundational idea that we all are capable of expressing compassion, and that we learn habits of thinking and speaking and behaving based on what we learn in our families, social groups, and culture.  NVC theory describes that conflicts arise when peoples various strategies for how they meet their various needs clash with one another–and NVC then provides tools by which people can identify shared needs and collaborate to create ways to meet those needs.  NVC thus can facilitate harmony and learning how to create future cooperation on levels of self, self-with-others, and within social systems and groups.

Non Violent Communication (NVC)

Since it was first developed in the 1960s, Nonviolent communication has proven tremendously helpful in reducing conflict within individuals, within families, within organizations and between warring countries and in conflict zones.

NVC was first formally taught in 1972 with a model based on three steps that included:  observations, feelings, and action-oriented wants.  By 1992, an fourth aspect was included, so NVC now includes:  observations, feelings, needs, and requests.  The most recent evolution of the NVC model places more emphasis on this model being a process, where primary focus and emphasis is placed on an NVC practitioner’s intentions when communicating, rather than the four steps themselves.  Through such shifted emphasis on intentions, the focus becomes more about fostering meaningful relationships, rather than just getting what one wants–and on extending heartfelt, respectful attentiveness to others, rather than thinking about what one will say in response.  Keeping in mind that the four steps are meant to provide a guideline, and that the main key is to embody the qualities of compassion in oneself, while either clearly expressing how you are without blaming or criticizing or empathically receiving how another person is without hearing blame or criticism, here they are:

(1) Observations

State what you directly observe that seems counter to your wellbeing (and empathically receive what another shares that they directly observe):  “When I (see / hear) … ”

2) Feelings

State how you feel (emotions and sensations–not thoughts) in relation to what’s observed (and empathically receive what another shares that they feel):  ” … I feel … ”

(3) Needs

State what you need or value (not a preference or action) that generates your feelings (and empathically receive what another needs and values):  “… because I need/value …”

(4) Requests

Clearly request what concrete actions you’d like taken, without demanding (and empathically receive what actions another would like taken):  “Would you be willing to … ?”

NVC in the Internet Age

At this time when face-to-face interactions now represent an ever-declining percentage of the time we spend interacting with others, we face a challenge of how to develop inner peace within ourselves and then effectively share that peace with the rest of the world.  When we remember that written words can carry inadvertent emotional “tones,” we can do a better job of making an extra effort to indicate, for example, that we intend a certain remark to be humorous, rather than taken offensively as a sarcastically negative, or snarky, remark.

When it comes to internet and social media communications, it’s not so important to stress about whether or not you did or said something right–but the main thing to focus on is practicing ever-deepening compassion with yourself, and with others.  Yes, this can be viewed as a form of spiritual practice, or of self-improvement.  While every sentient being has some knowledge of itself, the greatest heights of consciousness and self-consciousness come from self-reflection.  Such self-reflection starts with awareness of that which one may be less than proud–yet inevitably leads past those ‘darker’ areas into the light.

It may help to know you’re not alone in adopting a more compassionate way of living with yourself, with others, and with the world; there is a growing community of those of us dedicated toward living within ourselves in a state of unconditional love, and doing our best to share this expansive unconditional love with everyone in our lives.

You can watch the companion video to this blog post at:

 

___________________________

QuantumJumps300x150adCynthia Sue Larson is the best-selling author of six books, including Quantum Jumps. Cynthia has a degree in Physics from UC Berkeley, and discusses consciousness and quantum physics on numerous shows including the History Channel, Gaia TV, Coast to Coast AM, the BBC and One World with Deepak Chopra and on the Living the Quantum Dream show she hosts. You can subscribe to Cynthia’s free monthly ezine at: https://www.RealityShifters.com
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What’s Behind the Meteoric Rise of the Mandela Effect

Unless you’ve been on an extended retreat, you’ve likely heard the term “Mandela Effect” recently. ” While many are surprised by the recent surge of interest in the “Mandela Effect,” those of us who have been researching and writing about this phenomenon of reality shifts and alternate histories have long been anticipating just such a rise of interest. The “Mandela Effect” is named after South African anti-apartheid revolutionary Nelson Mandela, who became a topic of interest in the year 2010 by people noticing with surprise that he was alive at that time–since many people remembered him having died while incarcerated. I had published similar accounts of the dead being observed alive again in my 1999 book, Reality Shifts, and reporting first-hand accounts on the RealityShifters website from people all around the world noticing many dead people alive again. Observations of dead people alive again are just one of many types of Mandela Effects, with other notable examples including changes to song lyrics, movie dialogue, movie scenes, physical geography, physiological anatomy, and product names.

The Mandela Effect is one of those things most people won’t believe in until it happens to them. Like falling in love or going through heartbreak, the Mandela Effect is something you have to experience in order to fully embrace. And even then, it often takes more than one or two experiences to break through the resistance most of us have to accepting the existence of something that fundamentally challenges our unspoken foundational assumption that facts and historical events don’t change. This bias has been poetically expressed in the Rubaiyat of Omar Khayyam:

“The moving finger writes; and, having writ, moves on:
nor all thy piety nor wit shall lure it back to cancel half a line,
nor all thy tears wash out a word of it.” 

MandelaEffectTrendGraph

Google trend graph for “Mandela Effect”

When we encounter something indicating evidence that in fact, history has changed–it feels shocking to discover some of the lines have been canceled and washed out! We seem to be approaching ‘tipping point’ where it’s getting harder for scoffers to say there’s no such thing as the Mandela Effect / reality shifts / alternate histories. The term “Mandela Effect” originated with blogger Fiona Broome in 2010 after she attended a conference where many people talked with her about remembering how Nelson Mandela had died many years earlier–though official recorded history at that time indicated no such thing had actually occurred.

MoonrakerJawsGirl

Dolly and Jaws in “Moonraker”

Thanks to articles written by some Mandela Effect experiencers, the Mandela Effect shows evidence of increasing in popular awareness. Mandela Effect articles have been written by experiencers including the Lewiston Sun Journal’s Mark LaFlamme (“The Mandela Effect is Freaking Me Out“) who noticed a change on which side of his father he’s standing by in an old family photo;the New Zealand Herald’s Karl Puschmann (“Berenstein or Berenstain? The Riddle Making Book Lovers Mad“) who is certain the popular children’s books ought to be spelled “Berenstein” and not the way they’ve supposedly ‘always been spelled’ as Berenstain; and San Diego City Beat’s Tom Siebert (“Technology and Memory Down the Rabbit Hole“) who noticed a change to a memorable scene in a James Bond movie, “Moonraker,” in which the girl with the braces who fell in love with another character with shining teeth no longer has braces. I watched The James Bond film “Moonraker” several times while in college, and also remember the memorable scene in which the blonde girl named “Dolly” who wears glasses and braids shares a cheesy moment with Richard Kiels’ character, “Jaws,” when they notice how his shiny teeth complement the shiny braces on her teeth. Except now, she doesn’t have any braces on her teeth.

Taken individually–the way such observations of discrepancies between what we remember and recorded historical evidence have always been noted up until now–a single person feeling unsettled by noticing such a change would have been chalked up to their having made some kind of cognitive error. When such “mis-remembered” recollections are considered collectively, we are presented with the possibility that we are witnessing collectively agreed-upon awareness of differently remembered historical facts that we can start to take notice of.

Some scoffers have leapt to the conclusion that Mandela Effect experiencers who are noticing long-familiar words in movies, TV shows, books, and products are most likely suddenly sharing ‘false memories,’ due to the fact that human memories are not fully reliable. Such an explanation allows us to leave unquestioned some old assumptions that have quietly started to crumble at their very foundations since the advent of quantum physics just over a hundred years ago. While quantum physics shows us there can be no such thing as an objective observer, and now that two thirds of physicists recently surveyed agree that you and I and everything that exists does so in a superposition of states–we clearly need to revise both our scientific methodology and our assumptions about reality.

While I agree with the observation that human memories often do not match current historical records, it’s clear that stopping the thought process at that point is premature, and does not match what we are learning about the primacy of quantum logic in the natural world.

I’ve been researching this phenomena since the 1990s. It was originally called “reality shifts,” and first appeared in print in the book “Future Memory” by PMH Atwater to describe common (yet strange) experiences that near-death experiencers frequently have. I have been reporting on individual recollections of alternate histories involving everything from changes in books, to dead people alive again, to changes in the way motor memory works since 1999, in the earliest edition of my first book on this subject, Reality Shifts: When Consciousness Changes the Physical World, and in my free monthly Realityshifters ezine. I’m currently pursuing this Mandela Effect / reality shift topic in interviews with experts in the fields of quantum biology such as JohnJoe McFadden, quantum cognition such as Jerome Busemeyer, and quantum cosmology such as Yasunori Nomura on my blog and “Living the Quantum Dream” radio show. What I’m noticing is that this phenomenon appears to not be new, but rather we have reached a point in society where for the first time we are able to share memories with others that are different from the collective whole–and sometimes our memories show the same kind of alternate pasts that physicists such as Stephen Hawking have told us exist.

When we consider the matter of “confabulation” and “false recollections” at this dawning of the new Quantum Age, we see that we may eventually call such things “alternate recollections,” in recognition of awareness of the fact that we know that each and every one of us exists in a superimposed state, with access to many possible alternate histories, presents, and futures. The idea that the many worlds of quantum physics might be one and the same as the multiverse has been proposed by such esteemed physicists as Dr. Yasunori Nomura and Dr. Raphael Bousso of UC Berkeley, and increasing numbers of scientists are feeling optimistic that we might yet find evidence that we indeed live in a multiverse.

Finding Evidence of Many Worlds in Alternate Histories

There is an exciting human side to the subject of alternate histories and parallel worlds. While we don’t yet have technology to show photos from your past with evidence of parallel universes impinging on the very fabric of reality since the day you were born, we can look to see what kinds of evidence we are able to collect more easily. If we were feeling the effects of parallel universes, we would expect to occasionally notice that history doesn’t stay put. Occasionally, we’d have very different ideas of what happened than we’ve had before, or than others have had before. What would such alternate histories be like?

JFKcar1963nov22Dr. Robert A. Burton recounts a fascinating experience in his book, On Being Certain, of attending a medical school reunion dinner in which conversation turned to where people were when they heard the news that Kennedy was assassinated. Burton and his classmates had all been in their second year of medical school, attending similar classes and hanging out together. An argument broke out amongst the reunion attendees as a urologist thought they were all at lunch, an internist remembered they’d been in the lab, and a pathologist remembered being at a pub down the street from the med center. With classmates turning to Burton to be the tie-breaker, setting history straight, the pathologist and urologist both agreed on one thing as they announced in unison, “Everyone remembers the Kennedy assassination.”

If this was the first time such differences of memory related to significant events occurred, we might dismiss it as a humorous aside. But the fact of the matter is that researchers are increasingly becoming aware of what they call “false recollections.” With the advent of the Quantum Age, we may eventually call them “alternate recollections,” indicating awareness of the fact that we know that each and every one of us exists in a superimposed state, with access to many possible alternate histories, presents, and futures.

Challenger_1AUlric Neisser and Nicole Harsch conducted studies of Emory University students’ accuracy of recollections of events at the time of the Challenger space shuttle explosion, starting by collecting first-hand accounts from 106 students the day after the disaster detailing how they’d heard of the explosion, what they’d been doing at the time, where they were, and how they felt. The researchers followed up with the same students two and a half years later, and were startled to find that students achieved a mean score of 2.95 compared to a perfect score of 7. Less than 10% of the students were able to exactly match their original recollection of events, and over half of the students got a score less than 2.

The most noteworthy findings in this “flashbulb” memory study were student reactions when confronted with conflicting accounts. Many students persisted in confidently claiming that their current memories of events were completely accurate, even when confronted with their own hand-written journal entries. One student summed up what happened succinctly,

“That’s my handwriting, but that’s not what happened.”

It’s important to note that in this new Quantum Age, such cases of alternate histories are to be expected. They provide evidence of the superposition of states that we and everything around us exists within, so we can expect to occasionally see documented records from the past that differ from what we recall. In the Quantum Age, we understand that seeing our own handwritten notes that aren’t at all what we remember is one way that alternate histories become known.

Physicists Agree: You’re in a Superposition of States

When we understand that our belief structures are creations of our minds, we start noticing how varied individual belief structures can be from person to person. What one person considers to be realistic and matter-of-fact might seem outrageously peculiar to another. Even the idea that other people actually see images in their minds may seem outlandish to some people, let alone what those people see. When enough people shift their belief structures to look at the world in fresh, new ways, cultural paradigms shift.

Staying current with new scientific findings can help. While most non-physicists would likely see a solid physical object such as a table or a chair as only what it currently appears to be, a remarkable 2/3 majority of physicists interviewed in 2011 stated they believe that all objects can exist in superimposed states—much the way we know quantum ‘particles’ exist as energetic probabilities as much as physical particles we can measure and observe. University of Portland, Oregon, physics professor, Maximilian Schlosshauer summarized this remarkable agreement thus,

“More than two-thirds believed that there is no fundamental limit to quantum theory—that it should be possible for objects, no matter how big, to be prepared in quantum superpositions like Schrödinger’s cat. So the era where quantum theory was associated only with the atomic realm appears finally over.”

A Scientific Basis for Instantaneous Adaptation in Stressful Times

JohnCairns

John Forster Cairns

The scientific assumption that organisms experienced random mutations was seriously shaken by Harvard professor John Forster Cairns 1988 proposal that the organisms themselves were preferentially producing beneficial mutations. Cairns conducted experiments with E. coli bacteria that demonstrated that in times of stress, when the bacteria were starved from food they were capable of digesting, they made “adaptive mutations” to be able to receive nutritive sustenance from a food source they’d never been able to consume before.

This phenomenon in which E. coli mutated exactly the most optimal genes precisely when that mutation was required had no known basis nor explanation from established theories in genetics–and indeed seemed to contradict one of the central dogmas of molecular biology, that information only flows in one direction during transcription from DNA out to proteins to a cellular organism environment. John Cairns and Julie Overbaugh and others proposed a mechanism that what might be happening is that “the cell could produce a highly variable set of mRNA molecules and then reverse-transcribe the one that made the best protein.”

If reverse-engineering mutations by bacteria in times of starvation so they can start digesting lactose sounds crazy, it might help to know there exists a similar proven case of successful quantum biological adaptation: photosynthesis. Those who expect modern human technology to be faster and more efficient than the rustic natural world are quite surprised to learn that our best photovoltaic cells are only 20% efficient, compared with photosynthesizing plants and bacteria that regularly achieve 95% efficiency rates for transforming sunlight into energy. Plants have existed on Earth for millions of years, so it’s not too surprising to find that their natural process of photosynthesis likely utilizes quantum coherence to speed things up. In decades past, scientists believed that excited electrons carried energy randomly through photosynthetic systems in plants, hopping from one molecule to the next. More modern measurements of energy in the new field of quantum biology studying photosynthesizing plants indicates something much more efficient is going on. What appears to be happening is that electrons take advantage of the fact that energy can move not just in the material form, but in pure energy form, too, and entire systems of molecules can become entangled to allow the formation of a coherent wave that tries out different pathways simultaneously, until the most efficient route is very quickly determined. The quantum magic happens in each of a photosynthetic cell’s millions of antenna proteins that are surprisingly efficient and robust at routing energy with very little lost in transit.

University of Toronto biophysicist Greg Scholes published his findings of room-temperature quantum coherence behavior in common marine algae in Nature. Scholes describes an analogy of driving home through rush hour traffic to explain what these cells are doing:

“… you have three ways of driving home through rush hour traffic. On any given day, you take only one. You don’t know if the other routes would be quicker or slower. But in quantum mechanics, you can take all three of these routes simultaneously. You don’t specify where you are until you arrive, so you always choose the quickest route.”

Advantages of experiencing alternate realities

My point is that everyone is experiencing reality shifts that usually get brushed aside with the assumption from most social settings being that there has been confusion or misperception (with both parties assuming the other has made some kind of mental mistake). The reason I raise the topic of flashbulb memories in my book, Quantum Jumps, is to share the extraordinary findings of researchers who asked college freshmen immediately following the Challenger space shuttle explosion to write down where they were, what they were doing, and who they were with when they heard the news of this disaster very soon after it first occurred. Then some time later, these same students were again asked the same question before they were allowed to look at their own hand-written accounts. As some put it, “That’s my handwriting, but that’s not what happened.” Thanks to this research and stunning placebo effect results, we now have an opportunity to acknowledge that rather than explaining such reality shifts away as ‘memory lapses’ or confusion, we have always been witnessing the way quantum phenomena occurs at ALL levels of reality, and not only below the so-called “von Neumann cut.” I have a sense that research in these fields is about to lead us to a new level of awareness that facts can change–yet understanding of our true identity as being consciousness can help us best find our way forward in experiencing various possible realities.

What Would You Notice if You’re in a Superposition of States?

What would it feel like to exist in a superposition of states? How could you tell? You might notice things like: markedly different childhood memories from your siblings; spontaneous or speedy healing from illness or injury; different movie dialogue, writing in books, product names, song lyrics, TV shows, and celebrities alive again after being reported dead. In fact, this is precisely what people are reporting with such commonly recognized examples as:

BerensteinBearsBerenstein Bears VS Berenstain Bears

SnowWhiteQueenMirror

• “Mirror mirror on the wall” VS “Magic mirror on the wall”

• Mr. Rogers sings, “It’s a beautiful day in THE neighborhood” VS “It’s a beautiful day in THIS neighborhood”

DarthVaderLuke

• Darth Vader says to Luke Skywalker, “Luke, I am your father” VS “No, I am your father”

Mandela Effect Reports on the Rise

In addition to some of these commonly reported shared experiences of alternate histories, some people are also remembering other things differently, such as: “If you build it, they will come” instead of now, “If you build it, he will come” and “Jiffy” peanut butter instead of “Jif.” As increasing numbers of honest reporters and authors start running into their own experiences with the Mandela Effect–both the private experiences that only they recognize, and the more publicly shared varieties–we will continue the growing conversation about the Mandela Effect, and why increasing numbers of people are noticing it now.

And in the meantime, I recommend that you keep asking “How good can it get?” to harness imagination and your ability to provide yourself with self-guidance from your highest levels of consciousness. Asking this question helps ensure we are honoring a longer-term, fuller and more harmoniously interconnected optimal experience. We can trust our highest, largest, most comprehensive levels of consciousness, and in so doing we will continue to experience different pasts and instantaneous transformations as we move through these stressful times to more optimal realities.

You can see the YouTube summary of this blog post here: https://youtu.be/s40aoMlrGbA

___________________________

QuantumJumps300x150adCynthia Sue Larson is the best-selling author of six books, including Quantum Jumps. Cynthia has a degree in Physics from UC Berkeley, and discusses consciousness and quantum physics on numerous shows including the History Channel, Coast to Coast AM, the BBC and One World with Deepak Chopra and on the Living the Quantum Dream show she hosts. You can subscribe to Cynthia’s free monthly ezine at: https://www.RealityShifters.com
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Why Do Intuitive-Feelers Experience More Mandela Effects?

Why are some of the rarest personality types more likely to experience Mandela Effects and reality shifts? While Myers-Briggs “Intuitive Feelers” account for only 25% of the overall population, they are more likely than other personality types to observe Mandela Effects, reality shifts, and quantum jumps.

While I was preparing to present a talk in Boulder, Colorado  about ETs, AI, and Evolution of Human Consciousness, part of the material I was presenting has led me to recognize patterns that I’d not seen before, linking personality with observation of Mandela Effects and reality shifts.

What I noticed was that personality types who were most likely to recognize Mandela Effects were the Intuitive Feeling types, as identified by the Myers-Briggs personality test.

Myers-Briggs Personality Test

The Myers-Briggs Type Indicator (MBTI) personality inventory was developed by mother-daughter team Katharine Cook Briggs and her daughter, Isabel Briggs Myers.  Myers and Briggs applied some ideas and insights of Swiss psychiatrist, Carl Jung, to recognizing human personality characteristics.

The key principle underlying the foundation of this personality test is that much seemingly random variation in peoples’ behavior can be recognized to actually be orderly and consistent, because peoples’ behavior is driven by intrinsic differences in individual preferences.  The Myers-Briggs test is thus a test that one can take to identify their own individual preferences between such things as preferring to focus on the internal (Introvert) or external (Extrovert) world.

The resulting sixteen personality types thus present us with an overview of various personality types intended to capture the core essence of how people might view the world from those preferences expressed through their personalities.

It’s important to point out that personality type does not indicate nor represent character, and there is no ‘best type.’  While some types may be more or less common in various cultures and globally around the world, they are simply ways of viewing the world.

Within these sixteen types another pattern can be seen in which some people have “NF” at the core of their personality type.  This “NF” stands for “Intuitive Feeling” and INtuitive Feelers (NFs) are one of the basic temperance types, the others being:  INtuitive Thinkers (NTs), Sensate Judgers (SJs), and Sensate Perceivers (SPs).

 

Myers-Briggs Intuitive Feelers (NF) 

Some people call Myers-Briggs Intuitive Feelers “Catalysts,” and others call them “Empaths.”  These are people, like myself, who primarily experience Mandela Effects and reality shifts.

I’ve recently conducted surveys within Mandela Effect and reality shift experiencer groups, and found that while the overall population of NF types is about 25%, these personality types comprise the majority of Mandela Effect and reality shift experiencers, at percentages exceeding 75%.  While correlation is not equivalent with causation, we can nonetheless take note of this remarkable connection between people who have Intuitive Feeling personality types and those who are currently in the majority of experiencing Mandela Effects and reality shifts.

The Myers-Briggs personality test appears to be a good place to look when considering the evolution of human consciousness, to notice what kind of changes, if any, are occurring with the populations in the USA and around the world in these personality types.

 

Myers Briggs Personality Tests

If you haven’t taken your Myers-Briggs personality test, you can go to a website like HumanMetrics where you can answer a bunch of questions and get a relatively quick, free assessment.  You can also take the official Myers Briggs instrument online at the official Myers-Briggs website.  Once you get your results, you can see if your personality type looks right to you.  There have been many applications of Myers-Briggs personality tests over time.

 

You can watch the companion video to this blog post at:

 

___________________________

QuantumJumps300x150adCynthia Sue Larson is the best-selling author of six books, including Quantum Jumps. Cynthia has a degree in Physics from UC Berkeley, and discusses consciousness and quantum physics on numerous shows including the History Channel, Gaia TV, Coast to Coast AM, the BBC and One World with Deepak Chopra and on the Living the Quantum Dream show she hosts. You can subscribe to Cynthia’s free monthly ezine at: https://www.RealityShifters.com
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FOM5: The New AI Scare?

The Foundations of Mind V (FOM5)”The New AI Scare?” conference was hosted by the California Institute for Integral Studies (CIIS) by the CIIS Center for Consciousness Studies in San Francisco on Nov 3-4, 2017. It featured presentations by: Henry Stapp, Fred Alan Wolf, Seán Ó Nualláin, Cynthia Sue Larson, Stanley Klein, and Beverly Rubik. This fifth Foundations of Mind conference was scheduled to coincide with and celebrate the release of Henry Stapp’s new book, “Quantum Theory and Free Will.”

People registered through Foundations of Mind (FOM) participate in an ongoing series of conversational threads in areas related to consciousness, quantum interpretations, neuroscience, and higher education.

Aamod Shanker

Quantum Mind

Aamod Shanker presented ideas from traditions of eastern mysticism, particularly those describing vibrations (spanda) from Kashmiri Shaivism, and yogic ideologies of Patanjali, together with principles from wave/quantum mechanics, electromagnetics and principles of symmetries, structure and logic. There was a great deal of spirited conversation about this topic, with discussion about there being many words for consciousness in the east.

Kiril Popov

Reality, Truth, and Computation at the Boundary

Kiril Popov talked about the importance of boundary conditions, and design principles for the mind. There is a requirement that intelligent beings predict things before they happen, which requires memory. Boundary interfaces provide a kind of building block, with access to fields becoming possible via boundary conditions.

Brian Swimme

Mind and World 
Session chair Brian Swimme discussed cosmogenetic consciousness, and what that entails. He encouraged conference participants to experience a visceral sense of wonder with respect to speciation events that some scholars speculate are based on not just genetic mutations, but conscious intention and activity as well. When viewing evolutionary developments through this lens, we can thus recognize important distinctions between evolution of the bison and the horse, which evolved very differently from a common genetic ancestor–by attending to different streams of attention and intention. We can hypothesize that what gets brought forth through evolution is what it’s all about.

Menas Kafatos

Menas Kafatos Commentary on Quantum Theory and Free Will

Menas Kafatos presented a summary of important points from the orthodox interpretation of quantum mechanics as described in numerous publications by Henry P. Stapp and summarized in his new book, “Quantum Theory and Free Will: How Mental Intentions Translate into Bodily Actions.” Nature has values, including life–so we might ask how our values express themselves in a physical universe. Our universe is quantum on every level, although it appears classical, and the observer role is central in quantum physics.

Henry P. Stapp and Seán Ó Nualláin

Syamala Hari on Voluntary Action, Conscious Will and Readiness Potential

Syamala Hari discussed neural correlates of consciousness, neural models, and ways to interpret quantum mechanics in such a way that intention does activation.

 

Henry Stapp and Cynthia Sue Larson

If Artificial Intelligence Asks Questions, Will Nature Answer?

Cynthia Sue Larson considered how Henry Stapp’s orthodox interpretation of quantum mechanics suggests that when a question is asked, Nature answers–and then pursued this line of thinking to contemplate what happens if Artificial General Intelligence (AGI) asks a question. The impact of such a dialogue between AGI and Nature were explored, with consideration of humanity’s optimal role.

Stan Klein

Stan Klein on New Approaches to the Measurement Problem

Stan Klein provided an introductory overview of Quantum Electro Dynamics as necessary foundational groundwork prior to reviewing the importance of recognizing the selection problem in quantum physics. When we consider a moveable cut, we may well ask, “Who is the observer?”

Tania Re

Tania Re discussed research findings from the field of ethnogenic healing, with support from quantum physics indicating there is growing evidence to recommend consideration of psychotropic substances for therapeutic use.

Seán Ó Nualláin

Reterritorialization and Mental Health

Foundations of Mind founder Seán Ó Nualláin described the issues facing Ireland based on the background presented in his book, “Ireland, A Colony Once Again.” Since the 1990s, there has been a disturbing trends including encroachment of state, increasing suicide rates of the Irish populace, and a kind of illegal status quo–resulting in a Good Friday agreement that brought peace, and also a result that Ireland became a state with no land.

Phillip Shinnick

Phillip Shinnick discusses nature’s influence and mind training in QiGong

Phillip Shinnick described some of the research he has done to address difficulties in inorganic and organic measurement of QiGong energy. Mind and Qi appear to be separate, and Qi does not need mind activity to ‘do its own thing.’ Man cannot govern Dao Yin (nature), but rather nature is involved, and teaches us. Practicing QiGong produces measureable energetic effects, and changes the way we observe reality.

Wolfgang Baer

Wolfgang Baer

Wolfgang Baer presented a talk about “why I’m not afraid of A.I.,” introducing his Cognitive Action Theory where activity is at the center, and action does the activity–rather than emphasizing roles of ‘observers’ and ‘things.’ From this perspective, we feel we are together when we are moving together, and experience is explained by process. From this view, each of us is an event that contains time. We thus live in a world of interacting action cycles–a multiverse of persons.

Vipul Arora

Vipul Arora

Vipul Arora described how observations are essential building blocks of the world. We can quantify experiences in time according to predictable relationships in kinematics. We notice primary properties, or aspects of experience, which are different from emergent properties, and in so doing, we might well ask whether we can distinguish between different sources (tungsten, mercury, sodium lamps). Speech recognition started with higher emergent properties, but those results are limited and moving toward lower emergent properties. We see that limitations of detectors can undermine the importance of primary properties.

Fred Alan Wolf

Fred Alan Wolf

Fred Alan Wolf discussed self-referential consciousness, quantum mechanics, and Gödel numbers to demonstrate that minds can do what automatons cannot do, by transcending rules. There is something about ‘Gödelization’ that shows it is an unalgorithmic procedure, with measurements that are inherently unalgorithmic. Put in other words, we can’t consistently mathematize quantum wave function collapse.

 

Stan McDaniel

Stan McDaniel

Stan McDaniel talked about the philosophy of continuity, time, and opposition of the dominant paradigm consisting of mechanistic reductionism, physical time, and neoDarwinism. Stan pointed out that memory is used for two things: remembering, and bits of data stored somewhere. This leads us to consider whether a computer can look at it’s own memory, whereas humans are involved in a state of functional reciprocity with nature and the world.

Beverly Rubik and Harry Jabs

Beverly Rubik & Harry Jabs

Beverly Rubik talked about ways Artificial Intelligence can automate obtaining human health information from bio-well finger scans, and then potentially also provide specific balancing frequencies that have been shown effective in reducing stress and improving health. Harry Jabs described ways that A.I. might emulate humans, though robots lack emotions and also will lack a human biofield.

Karla Galdamez

Karla Galdamez

Karla Galdamez described her study of intention at a distance as a source of information transfer and wave function collapse in a recent experiment. This particular experiment involved a Zen meditator in an electromagnetically shielded room, and a remote helper, connected via internet. 

 

 

 

Additional photos and news announcements from the Foundations of Mind IV conference can be viewed at the Foundations of Mind facebook page.

___________________________
QuantumJumps300x150adCynthia Sue Larson is the best-selling author of six books, including Quantum Jumps. Cynthia has a degree in Physics from UC Berkeley, and discusses consciousness and quantum physics as the host of her radio show Living the Quantum Dream, and as a guest on numerous shows including: the History Channel, Coast to Coast AM, the BBC, Gaia TV, and One World with Deepak Chopra. You can subscribe to Cynthia’s free monthly ezine at: https://www.RealityShifters.com
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Quantum Mechanics Meets Neuroscience at Consciousness Conference

The Foundations of Mind IV (FOM4)”Quantum Mechanics Meets Neuroscience” conference was hosted by the California Institute for Integral Studies (CIIS) by the CIIS Center for Consciousness Studies in San Francisco on January 27, 2017. It featured presentations by: John Hagelin, Stuart Hameroff, Ruth Kastner, Henry Stapp, Russell Targ, Jack Sarfatti, George Weissmann, Elizabeth Rauscher, Leslie Allan Combs, Fred Alan Wolf, Shelli Joye, Seán Ó Nualláin, Cynthia Sue Larson, Stanley Klein, and Chris Cochran. This fourth Foundations of Mind conference was scheduled to coincide with what would have been Walter Freeman III’s 90th birthday.

People registered through Foundations of Mind (FOM) have joined in numerous conversational threads in areas related to the quantum paradigm, consciousness, quantum interpretations, neuroscience, and higher education.

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Seán Ó Nualláin

Neurodynamics

Foundations of Mind founder Seán Ó Nualláin began the conference by talking about the history of Foundations of Mind, starting with a humble initial budget of $55 a few years ago. In just a few years time, Foundations of Mind has grown to an organization that has created over a hundred peer-reviewed papers–with 79 papers published in just the past three years–all the while providing researchers full rights. The tremendous success of Foundations of Mind is obvious when witnessing the exponential increase in online views and downloads of it’s published research papers, with over 28 million views of all papers published through Cosmos and History in 2015 alone.

Ó Nualláin shared insights and breakthroughs associated with Walter Freeman III’s work that will likely continue for many years to come. Ó Nualláin elucidated the differences between Pribram and Freeman’s work from his unique perspective of having had the opportunity to work closely with both of them. Ó Nualláin explained how Pribram’s holonomic approach arises from consideration of the “microscopic” level–such as individual neurons–while Freeman’s research focused on mass action at the “mesoscopic” level. Ó Nualláin emphasized Freeman’s point that a critical mistake neurologists often make is in supplanting ‘neural fields’ with ‘neuron doctrine,’ as he called for a return to neural field research. Ó Nualláin emphasized that there are important clues to discerning between consciousness and awakeness that can be found in gamma synchrony, with characteristically brief (about 3 seconds at most) synchronous states attained through meditation that requires less energy than other mental states. 

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Shelli Joye


Tuning the Mind 

Shelli Joye presented a talk about how quantum field theory can be applied to the electromagnetic field, resulting in quantum electrodynamics. A hypothesis of consciousness residing in the frequency domain is congruent with David Bohm’s implicate order, which appears to provide support for experiences of mystics and psychonauts.

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Chris Cochran

Wolfgang Pauli’s Background Physics

Chris Cochran talked about conversations between physicist Wolfgang Pauli and psychologist Carl Jung mostly centered on the topic of Pauli’s dream interpretations. The notion of background physics was presented as a method of psychoanalytic interpretation applied to foundations of quantum mechanics–comprising a practice of self knowledge that emerges in relation to knowledge of quantum mechanics. One of the more interesting conclusions from this rather unique quantum interpretation is that Pauli took complementarity to express the impossibility of final determination of the categories of ‘physical’ and ‘psychic,’ resulting in a conclusion of it being an impossibility for there to be mere ‘physical’ grounding for science. Cochran reminded us of Carl Jung’s suggestion to note that “Only from his wholeness can man create a model of the whole.”

Stuart Hameroff, Jack Sarfatti, and Cynthia Sue Larson

Stuart Hameroff, Jack Sarfatti, and Cynthia Sue Larson

Consciousness in the Universe

Stuart Hameroff presented the “Orch OR” theory that he and physicist Roger Penrose devised to provide a physical explanation for where consciousness might be found to reside. Hameroff began his talk by describing how most modern science is based on an ‘integrate and fire’ neural model that has led to brain mapping, which so far has not been very fruitful. When Penrose suggested the idea that microtubules might be capable of processing information along the lines of a kind of biological quantum computer, we gained an idea for how human memory might work. Hameroff noted that consciousness is definitely not a computation, stating that Penrose used Gödel’s theorem to show conscious understanding is non-computational. Penrose points out that ‘self-collapse’ is consciousness, and we can imagine our conscious minds as something akin to an orchestra warming up.

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John Hagelin

Search for Consciousness

John Hagelin presented a summary of recent theories and evidence refuting the
“objective” or “OR” component of “Orch OR.” Hagelin asserted that the OR portion of Orch-OR needs a closer look, since once it is considered in light of recent developments in theoretical quantum physics, the OR portion doesn’t stand up. Hagelin was quick to point out that this does not mean that quantum mechanics does not play a role in consciousness. He continued that he feels the absence of any mechanism suggests that there might not be any wave function collapse; instead we may have the emergence of a multiplicity of parallel viewpoints via decoherence within a single wave function, all operating within a single universal consciousness.

Lively Discussions

A lively panel discussion with Stuart Hameroff, Stan Klein, Henry Stapp and John Hagelin followed the morning sessions, with Ruth Kastner stating that the matter of the collapse of the wave function needs to be addressed, and advising against “shoving the collapse under a different piece of furniture in the room.”

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Russell Targ


Nonlocal Remote Perception

Russell Targ talked about the long and successful history of the remote viewing program that he managed for many years at SRI, and showed a movie clip from the forthcoming documentary film, Third Eye Spies. Targ discussed some of the more remarkable discoveries from nonlocal remote perception (aka “remote viewing”) such as he oversaw at SRI in the 1970s. Targ emphasized that “remote viewing is so easy that even a scientist can do it.”  Targ’s ability to provide prompts to those learning to do remote viewing for the first time proved especially fruitful, such as asking a viewer to “show me the surprising images that come into your mind.”

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Stan Klein

Testing Psychic Phenomena

Stan Klein presented his talk on, “Using Psychic Phenomena to Test Walter Freeman’s Devotion to Connecting Neuropil to Hard Problems.” Stan made a call for more and better experiments investigating findings in psychic phenomena in the future.

How Hippies Can Save the 2nd Quantum Revolution

Cynthia Sue Larson introduced the afternoon sessions devoted to presentations by Ruth Kastner, Elizabeth Rauscher, George Weissmann, Fred Alan Wolf, Henry Stapp, and Jack Sarfatti.

Cynthia Sue Larson and Ruth Kastner

Science Hasn’t Disproven Free Will

Ruth Kastner presented a different perspective on the topic of free will than the currently prevailing view amongst most quantum physicists–that there is no such thing as personal choice; it’s all probabilities. Kastner contends that we do have free will, as she guided us through an exploration of considering oneself as a ‘quantum system’ in a ready state. It’s clear when envisioning this scenario that each person is enormously complex while existing in an open (rather than closed) state. Choices are not really quantum observables, and each choice option is not represented by an eigenvalue. It is thus physically inaccurate, for example, to call a choice made by Hitler a “quantum defined observable.” Kastner reminded us of a quote by Freeman Dyson, “… mind is already inherent in every electron, and the processes of human consciousness differ only in degree but not in kind from the processes of choice between quantum states which we call ‘chance’ when they are made by electrons.”

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Elizabeth Rauscher

Paradigm Shift Number II Ready to Happen

Elizabeth Rauscher talked about how she and George Weissmann initially formed the Fundamental Fysiks Group at UC Berkeley in 1975 to delve deeper into the mysteries of quantum physics beyond the “shut up and calculate” point of view. Quantum concepts were explored with talks by David Bohm and some Nobel prize recipients. Rauscher discussed the idea of quantum reality, showing how EPR fits in with Bell’s Theorem, and what happens as our previously accepted notions of reality fail. Rauscher explained how there is a notion of approximate reality associated with the quantum realm, sandwiched between improbabilities, in a narrow slice of physical ‘exact reality.’ Rauscher provided an overview of subjective versus objective aspects of reality, and the value of precognition in bringing information from the future back to the past, as described in more detail in her books and papers.

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George Weissmann and Elizabeth Rauscher


The Quantum Paradigm

George Weissmann discussed the nature of paradigms, and the way presuppositions are implicit unconscious assumptions that often have a dangerous way of sneaking into our theories unquestioned–going mostly unnoticed and ignored. Weissmann stressed that it is absolutely critical in these times to become paradigm-aware. One fundamental assumption to examine more closely is that of objectivity: that there exist such things as objects. When we challenge assumptions, it’s not the same thing as negating it, but rather challenging can be understood to be a process of questioning. In the case of objectivity, we can then keep track of subject and object with every distinction being made. Classical physics is always about ‘external things,’ while quantum is not about external things. Quantum theory is a process, and the arena is in the mind… which leads us to wonder, “Which mind?” We thus begin to gain a sense of relational quantum theory that is personal and not idealistic (mind VS matter), since experience consists of both subject and object. Dreams can thus provide us with a good metaphor for the quantum paradigm, with an implicit sense of One Mind cosmology, in which the quantum paradigm can qualitatively explain and predict.

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Fred Alan Wolf

Ontology, Epistemology, Consciousness, and Closed Timelike Curves

Fred Alan Wolf discussed some ideas behind quantum computers having to do with viewing the universe as a multiverse along the lines of what David Deutsch suggests, with closed timelike curves in the multiverse, and wormholes connecting universes in the multiverse. Such a conceptualization of the multiverse transcends linear dynamics, so everything can be considered as being part of parallel universes, where previous time travel paradoxes no longer wreak the kind of havoc we’ve come to expect. Both the “knowledge paradox” and “grandfather paradox” can be resolved through chronological-respecting qubits and consistent time-looping qubits. What comes out of one wormhole thus goes into another world, with entanglement being preserved overall throughout the multiverse.

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Henry Stapp

Backward-in-Time Effect in Orthodox Forward-in-Time Relativistic Quantum Field Theory

Henry Stapp pointed out that the present exists “now” and this representation of reality is represented by density matrix. Density matrix is ontological, and represents potentialities with statistical weights, evolving smoothly through time. When considering experiments such as Daryl Bem’s “feeling the future” precognitive experiments, an upsurge of conductance occurs before the stimulus is applied–which seems to provide evidence for backward-in-time causation. When considering such experiments, we must understand orthodox von Neumann quantum theory in a way that is not normally considered. We thus need to better understand ‘actual past’ versus ‘historical past’ so we understand and appreciate that history does not create us.

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Jack Sarfatti

Recent Advances in Post-Quantum Physics: The Third Revolution

Jack Sarfatti advocated considering an earlier Bohmian pilot wave view of quantum physics, utilizing John Bell’s “be-ables” in conjunction with the work of Sutherland. Quantum information waves can thus be considered to actually be mental waves, so there is an ontological physical field that manifests as quantum potential, Q, as “will” or “volition.” Mental waves do not have qualia unless the matter they act on reacts directly to them. There is thus a kind of post-quantum action-reaction that has much in common with the wormholes and closed timelike curves presented by Fred Alan Wolf. As soon as you have wormholes, you have consciousness, operating in a block universe. Both future and past are located on the horizon.

Informal Conference Conversations

Melanie O’Reilly with Corca Baiscin

Conference attendees got a chance to mingle with others during breaks, at lunch, and after the conference. An evening musical performance by Corca Baiscin (pronouced Kurka Boshkin) featured vocalist Melanie O’Reilly’s beautiful Celtic jazz. “Kurka Boshkin/Corca Baiscin” combines Irish traditional music with a Celtic-Americana contemporary twist, interwoven with jazz improvisation. Corca Baiscin is the name of the ancient territory now known as County Clare on the west coast of Ireland; you can hear a sample of Corca Baiscin playing “The Tamlin” in this video clip: https://youtu.be/6QycRVt8Xf8 and Melanie O’Reilly sing “The Diamond Rocks” here: https://youtu.be/mVRqR_pjVs0

Some presenters and attendees continued to enjoy a meal and post-conference conversation at a nearby restaurant.

Additional photos and news announcements from the Foundations of Mind IV conference can be viewed at the Foundations of Mind facebook page.

___________________________
QuantumJumps300x150adCynthia Sue Larson is the best-selling author of six books, including Quantum Jumps. Cynthia has a degree in Physics from UC Berkeley, and discusses consciousness and quantum physics as the host of her radio show Living the Quantum Dream, and as a guest on numerous shows including: the History Channel, Coast to Coast AM, the BBC, One World with Deepak Chopra, and Gaia TV. You can subscribe to Cynthia’s free monthly ezine at: https://www.RealityShifters.com
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How to discuss politics calmly with anyone

cslflag

It is possible to discuss politics (and religion) without starting a fight, when we understand how it is possible to heal social rifts with moral psychology.

“Happiness comes from between. It comes from getting the right relationship between yourself and others, yourself and your work, and yourself and something larger than yourself.” — Jonathan Haidt

If you’re concerned about discussing politics over the holidays following this year’s presidential election, you’re not alone. When conversations about politics and religion come up, things can get quite touchy–but there is a way you can still stay calm and carry on a respectful conversation.

righteousmind

Moral psychologist Jonathan Haidt asks the excellent question in his book, The Righteous Mind, “Why do good people get divided by politics and religion?”

One thing that moral psychologists do is to take a look scientifically at answering the question, “What does it take to be a moral person?” You might think this would simply be a matter of knowing the difference between good and bad. And of course, it is. But how can we determine the simple difference between good and bad? How do people do that? Why is it that amongst cultures in the world some people’s idea of what’s good and bad are so very different than someone else’s? Yet overall, the things that help us decide whether something is good or bad are very similar.

Why is it that liberals and conservatives, in times of political elections, can get so upset to the point that they have trouble seeing straight, let alone finding common ground, when they really are smart people with good hearts? How can that be?

These are the questions that moral psychologists seek to answer. By asking really difficult questions that were extremely uncomfortable for the people being asked those questions, moral psychologists such as Jonathan Haidt, have been able to determine “the five taste buds of morality.” And these five taste buds that form the basis for Moral Foundation Theory are extremely interesting:

Care versus Harm;
Fairness versus Cheating;
Liberty versus Oppression;
Loyalty versus Betrayal;
Authority versus Subversion; and
Sanctity versus Degradation.

These five are a bit similar to taste bud senses of like: savory, salty, sweet, sour, and bitter–except these are moral tastes.

In general, people who are strong in exhibiting conservative traits care just a little bit less than liberals about things like Care versus Harm and Fairness versus Cheating, but they care a whole lot more about Loyalty, Authority, and Sanctity. When you start thinking about things in this way, you can begin to bridge the gap that sometimes develops between people who are quite conservative or quite liberal.

Another big idea from The Righteous Mind is that when people come to a decision about something, like whether they are conservative or liberal, or how they feel about a certain contentious subject, they will tend to make decisions first and foremost not from their heads, but from their intuitive-emotional body, which often doesn’t necessarily know why it’s leaning one way or another. Jonathan Haidt describes this with a metaphor of a person riding an elephant. The elephant has a tendency to want to go one way or the other, and the person riding the elephant–the rational mind–then comes up with reasons why this may or may not be a good idea.

Follow the Sacredness

Many of us are wondering what we can do this holiday season to keep peace in our family and at home.

Something we can do whenever noticing differences of feelings and opinions is to do what Jonathan Haidt calls: “Follow the Sacredness.”

What that means is, look for that relationship between someone and something bigger than themselves. And keep an open heart and an open mind when you’re looking for this, so that you can better empathize, and get a little glimpse of what’s going on with the moral foundations within that group. Maybe they’re not only looking at Care versus Harm and Fairness versus Cheating, but maybe they’re looking at a lot more.  And maybe these things matter a great deal to them. By following the sacredness, it makes it easier for all of us to appreciate and truly “get” what makes somebody else tick. What it is that they’re living for that is larger than themselves.

I hope this is helpful for you, and I invite you to keep asking “How good can it get?”

___________________________

QuantumJumps300x150adCynthia Sue Larson is the best-selling author of six books, including Quantum Jumps. Cynthia has a degree in Physics from UC Berkeley, and discusses consciousness and quantum physics on numerous shows including the History Channel, Coast to Coast AM, the BBC and One World with Deepak Chopra and on the Living the Quantum Dream show she hosts. You can subscribe to Cynthia’s free monthly ezine at: https://www.RealityShifters.com
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Americans Used to Get Happier in Their Thirties. Not Any More

By Olivia Goodhill |  Quartz

Happiness

For decades, Americans struggled through angst-filled and turbulent teenage years only to become happier once they reached the full bloom of adulthood. But that link between age and happiness disappeared in 2010, according to a study published in Social Psychological and Personality Science on Nov. 5. Adolescents have become steadily happier while those in their thirties are more miserable.

The authors of the study, led by Jean Twenge, psychology professor at San Diego State University, analyzed four nationally representative surveys from the 1970s to 2014, with a total sample size of 1.32 million people, to reach their conclusions. But they can only offer theories, rather than definitive answers, as to why older people are less happy when they used to be.

One theory is that unrealistically high expectations have set adults up for disappointment. If young people are constantly told that they can achieve anything they want, then that could well boost their happiness while they are still in school and untested—but would lead to a drop in happiness for those who don’t become as high-earning or successful as they were led to expect.

Twenge expanded on her paper in an article for The Atlantic, where she wrote:

Big dreams feel great when you’re an adolescent or a young adult just starting out. But somewhere around their late 20s, most people begin to realize reality isn’t going to match up. When those dreams are more widespread than they used to be, the inevitable crash will be, too.

[Read more here]

Robert O'Leary 150x150Robert O’Leary, JD BARA, has had an abiding interest in alternative health products & modalities since the early 1970’s & he has seen how they have made people go from lacking health to vibrant health. He became an attorney, singer-songwriter, martial artist & father along the way and brings that experience to his practice as a BioAcoustic Soundhealth Practitioner, under the tutelage of the award-winning founder of BioAcoustic Biology, Sharry Edwards, whose Institute of BioAcoustic Biology has now been serving clients for 30 years with a non-invasive & safe integrative modality that supports the body’s ability to self-heal using the power of the human voice. Robert brings this modality to serve clients in Greater Springfield (MA), New England & “virtually” the world, with his website, www.romayasoundhealthandbeauty.com. He can also be reached at romayasoundhealthandbeauty@gmail.com.




How to Persuade Others with the Right Questions: Jedi Mind Tricks from Daniel H. Pink

Source:Big Think

Sales guru and persuasion expert Daniel H. Pink explains how you can use motivational interviewing to influence others’ thoughts and behaviors. Pink’s latest book is To Sell Is Human: The Surprising Truth About Motivating Others.

Transcript – So let me give you a hypothetical. Suppose that you’re a parent and you have a daughter, say a teenage daughter, who’s room is an absolute mess. It just looks like a bomb went off in there and you want your daughter to clean her room. You’re trying to sell her on the idea of cleaning her room. What do you do? Well, you could try to bribe her and that might work in the short term. You could try to threaten her — that might work in the short term. You can try to exhort her, you can try to, you know, tell her about the meaning of clean rooms. But there’s actually a technique from actually the counseling literature really crystallized by a fellow named Mike Pantalon of Yale University called motivational interviewing. And what you can do more effectively is ask two irrational questions. So, let’s say that you have a daughter named Maria and Maria has a messy room and you want Maria to clean her room. The two questions you could ask Maria are this. “Maria, on a scale of one to ten, one meaning I’m not ready at all; ten meaning I’m ready to do it right now. How ready are you, Maria, to clean your room.” Now, Maria’s room is a pig sty so she’s not going to give you a ten or a nine or even a five. Maybe she’ll give you a two.
So she says, “Dad, I’m a two.” Well here’s where the second question comes in and it’s a really interesting counterintuitive question. You say to Maria, “Okay, Maria. You’re a two. Why didn’t you pick a lower number?” Now our instincts as parents is to say — as a parent of three kids I have this instinct very strongly. If my kid were to say to me I’m a two, I would say, “What, why are you a two? You should be a nine.” But you say, “Why didn’t you pick a lower number, Maria?” So here’s what happens. Maria has to explain why she isn’t a one. Okay. So she says, “Well, you know, I am 15 and I probably should get my act together. You know, if I had my room cleaner I’d be able to get to school on time, faster and maybe see my friends a little bit more. You know, you and mom never know where anything is anyway so I’m kind of wasting my time asking you to help me.” What happens?
With that second question why didn’t you pick a lower number, Maria begins articulating her own reasons for doing something. And this is really axiomatic in sales and persuasion. When people have their own reasons for doing something — not yours — their own reasons for doing something they believe those reasons more deeply and adhere to the behavior more strongly.

Now suppose Maria says, “Dad, on a scale of one to ten I’m a one.” Okay. That makes things a little more complicated but it’s actually really, really important to understand this. If you say to Maria — if Maria says, “Dad, I’m a one.” Here’s what you say to Maria. “Maria, what can we do to make you a two.” And what often that does is this. Maria will say, “Well maybe if you and mom help me for 15 minutes to get this started.” “Maybe if you maybe not set the table and take out the trash tonight, that would free up some time for me.” Because usually when people are a one, it’s often because — not because they’re purely obstinate. It’s because there’s some kind of environmental obstacle in front of them. And if someone says they’re a one, find out what that obstacle is, try to make them a two and that might give you some more momentum.

Now the example I just gave had to do with parenting but you can use this more universally. Now you can’t whip it out at every single persuasive encounter but you can use it to persuade your boss. You can use it maybe to persuade a reluctant prospect in an actual sales encounter. You can use it with someone — your neighbor who’s resisting moving his garbage cans or something like that. The key here — and again you’ve got to go back to first principles here. The key here is that we tend to think that persuasion or motivation is something that one person does to another. And what the social science tells us very clearly is that it’s really something that people do for themselves. And your job as a persuader, as a motivator, is to reset the context and surface people’s own reasons for doing something. Because it works a lot better.




The Science of Reframing Subconscious Narrative

Cynthia Sue Larson

Cynthia Sue Larson

Have you noticed how two people can experience the same or similar circumstances, yet they often come away with very different viewpoints regarding what happened? Most of us experience this sort of puzzling discrepancy when we were children and our caretakers described a different view of the world than what we felt had transpired. Before we learned any language, we humans automatically construct narratives by which to make sense of the world. These narratives help us develop social cognitive functioning from infancy, where we differentiate between those who are possibly helpful or harmful.

0805072756.emotionsrevealedReframing Narratives and Emotions

I’ve been enjoying reading Emotions Revealed by Dr. Paul Ekman, in which he describes some fascinating research including how our emotional responses to various situations can change based on our interpretation of what is going on. We humans have muscles that move in synchronization with various emotions, and the resulting facial expressions have been proven to be recognized and understood across all cultures and countries in the world. Additionally, when we make various expressions by moving particular muscles associated with various emotions, we feel the very emotions that are associated with moving those muscle groups. Part of the reason that humans depend upon accurately reading and understanding facial expressions (including micro-expressions and suppressed expressions) is that our safety and wellbeing requires us to constantly be aware of potential dangers in our environment–so we must be able to know in a microsecond whether a nearby human is showing an expression of fear or surprise, in order that we may respond quickly enough to potentially dangerous situations. Despite the fact that there is a clear relationship between globally recognizable emotions in the form of facial expressions, surprisingly, most people do not receive training in accurately interpreting facial expressions with their variety of associated emotional meanings. Thanks to Dr. Paul Ekman’s work as he describes in Emotions Revealed, we can see photographs of how people look when they are moving precise muscle groups on their faces and feeling various blends of emotions–including when they are masking or concealing deeper underlying emotions with others.

Since our emotions are primary motivating forces for most everything we do, learning how they establish a subconscious narrative for what we believe to be occurring provides us with a foundational basis for what we can do to better understand–and perhaps change–that story line. In this way, we can, for example, recognize that what we initially took to be an overly critical boss might actually care a great deal about us, and the criticisms might have more to do with our boss being afraid we might quit and leave than feeling we aren’t doing our job well enough. We can thus better appreciate the underlying subconscious narratives going on in all the people around us as well as in our own lives, allowing us to rise above the “little stuff” as we expand our sense of self and begin to appreciate the Big Questions, such as, “Who am I?” and “What am I doing here?” and rise above the day-to-day practical matters required for survival.

Reframing Narratives and the Placebo Effect

Excellent examples of benefits we can experience from reframing our subconscious narratives can be found in the Placebo Effect. Recent placebo studies are reporting that people can experience improvements in a wide variety of areas, including: reduction of pain, improvement in vision, improved test scores, increased levels of confidence, increased mobility in people with knee problems, reduction of Parkinson’s disease symptoms, and much more–from such things as supportive remarks, ‘power postures,’ sham surgeries, sugar pills and other placebos with no known curative powers. Researchers have even found that we cognitively benefit from placebo sleep, by telling ourselves we’ve slept well.

Some exciting news this year is that placebos are helping people relieve suffering from IBS and migraines in studies that are showing amazingly promising results–even when those receiving placebo treatment are told, “the treatment you are getting is a placebo.” While scientists in research centers such as at Harvard’s Program in Placebo Studies still seek the underlying mechanism responsible for people experiencing statistically significant improvements in a multitude of different ways, it’s becoming clear that the Placebo Effect is real, substantial, and somehow involves our subconscious beliefs–and narratives–about what we feel is happening in our lives.

And if it weren’t amazing enough that placebos can be effective even when people know they are “just receiving a placebo,” and not an actual surgery or medical intervention of some sort–in America, the Placebo Effect is increasing in efficacy over time. The percentage of people in placebo groups experiencing noticeable changes is going up decade by decade–possibly due to longer clinical trial periods, and perhaps also thanks to the requirement in such placebo studies that researchers tell study participants the truth regarding the remarkable efficacy of placebo treatments.

SpielbergHarvard2016Retelling Our Own Stories

When film director Steven Spielberg gave his 2016 commencement speech at Harvard, he said, “We have to tell our own stories.” Spielberg went on to point out the importance of how each of us reaches character-defining moments in our lives in which we can hear our internalized voices of authority from our parents, teachers, bosses, and spouses indicating what we “should” do–as well as the quieter intuitive whispers and internal voices indicating what we “could” do.

In the course of working with clients as an intuitive life coach, I frequently delve into “what if” possibilities, encouraging my clients to heed the call of their hearts’ desires and feel the pull of their possible selves having the times of their lives. Simply imagining there may be another possible me and another possible you who are standing up for what we believe in, facing our fears, and pursuing our dreams is the first step in recognizing that it’s never too late to live a happy life.

No matter what situation we may find ourselves in, it is always possible to step back and observe ourselves and all others from a more expansive point of view from which we can reframe the narrative and ourselves. This kind of reframing provides us with an opportunity by which we can review memories of what we recall from past events as well as envisioned possibilities in the future–and this reframing is hardly the passive activity it might at first seem, but indeed quite possibly the most revolutionary and powerful action any one of us can ever make.

How Good Can it Get?

When we recognize the growing body of evidence supporting these ideas of the power of changing our subconscious narrative, we can better appreciate the power of asking my favorite question, “How good can it get?” in every situation, every day. Together, we can re-frame the global narratives of the world, enjoying getting the answers to a question we would all actually really enjoy getting the answer to.

You can see the YouTube summary of this blog post here: https://youtu.be/Yvs2cjTqeV0

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QuantumJumps300x150adCynthia Sue Larson is the best-selling author of six books, including Quantum Jumps. Cynthia has a degree in Physics from UC Berkeley, and discusses consciousness and quantum physics on numerous shows including the History Channel, Coast to Coast AM, the BBC and One World with Deepak Chopra. You can subscribe to Cynthia’s free monthly ezine at: https://www.RealityShifters.com
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Foundations of Mind Conference 2016: Science as if Being Mattered

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Some presenters and attendees at Foundations of Mind III

The Foundations of Mind III (FOM3) conference took place in Berkeley May 18-20, 2016, featuring presentations by Menas Kafatos, Fred Alan Wolf, Edward Frenkel, Leslie Combs, Henry Stapp, Jacob Needleman, Arnaud Delorme, Peter Duesberg, Glenn Hartelius, Shelli Joye, Beverly Rubik, Judy Gardiner, Wolfgang Baer, Seán Ó Nualláin, Cynthia Sue Larson, Ashok Narashimhan, Neil Theise, Jack Engstrom, Glenn Aparicio Parry, and many more. With two full days of conference proceedings, this year’s conference was a veritable feast of interdisciplinary ideas, wisdom and information from around the world.

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The first Foundations of Mind book

The FOM3 conference happily coincided with the release of the first Foundations of Mind book, Dualism, Platonism, and Voluntarism, edited by Seán Ó Nualláin. This book features discussion and dialogue with Henry Stapp and Walter Freeman, among others, and is now available for purchase through the publisher’s website.

Videos from the FOM3 conference presentations will be available through the Foundations of Mind website, and papers will be published in the future, too. People registered through Foundations of Mind are joining in several threads of on-going conversations begun at the conference, and moving forward to explore topics of the quantum paradigm, consciousness, biosemiotics, and higher education.

Honoring Walter Freeman

The remarkable lifetime achievements of Walter Freeman were honored at the start of this year’s conference, with his certificates and diploma on display. Melanie O’Reilly read some words of remembrance written by Seán Ó Nualláin, who got to know Walter while was a visiting scholar in Walter Freeman’s lab at UC Berkeley.

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Menas Kafatos

Edward Frenkel, Henry Stapp, Seán Ó Nualláin, and Menas Kafatos


The Nature of Consciousness

Menas Kafatos chaired a session on consciousness, featuring talks by: Menas Kafatos, Arnaud Delorme, Glenn Hartelius, Henry Stapp, Edward Frenkel, Ashok Narasimhan, Neil Theise, Shelli Joye, and Leslie Combs. Arnaud Delorme discussed his work with Dean Radin at the Institute of Noetic Sciences involving experimental approaches to studying possible nonlocal properties of consciousness.

Allan "Leslie" Combs

Allan “Leslie” Combs

Glenn Hartelius discussed the challenges of measuring consciousness. Henry Stapp presented his thoughts about quantum mechanics and the role of the mind. Edward Frenkel called for ethics while discussing artificial intelligence and reasons of the heart. Menas Kafatos talked about fundamental awareness and the foundation of the universe. Ashok Narasimhan explained how we can understand consciousness through qualitative content. Neil Theise encouraged us to think about fundamental awareness and the self-organizing universe. Shelli Joye outlined the Pribram-Bohm holoflux theory of consciousness. Leslie Combs delved into the real hard problem of consciousness. Menas Kafatos led a spirited panel discussion that included Seán Ó Nualláin, following individual paper presentations.

Judy Gardiner

Judy Gardiner

Further Explorations of Consciousness

Judy Gardiner chaired a session that continued our exploration of consciousness, with consideration of patterns, thresholds, and patterns featuring talks by: Judy Gardiner, Jerry Gin, Zann Gill, Ryan Castle, and John Engstrom. Judy Gardiner talked about consciousness without constraint, exploring the ways dreams and real life intertwine, and Aha! moments of revelatory insight can arise. Jerry Gin discussed connections between fundamental pattern and consciousness. Zann Gill talked about fundamental pattern and consciousness. Ryan Castle discussed universal consciousness factors. John Engstrom discussed deep ontic and epistemological parsings.

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Jacob Needleman and Seán Ó Nualláin

Jacob Needleman asks Questions of Being

Seán Ó Nualláin engaged in a dialogue with Jacob Needleman that many found to be one of the highlights of this conference, delving into the difference between problems we face and how we ask questions that are not related to our immediate concerns. Questions of being such as, “Are we alone in the universe?” “Is there such a thing as God?” “Who am I?” “Why do we live?” “Why do we suffer?” “Is death the end?” “Why is there evil?” “What can we hope for?” “What can we know?” and “How shall we live?” are the great questions that cannot be answered from a problem-solving state of consciousness.

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Fred Alan Wolf

Is the Mind/Soul a Platonic Tachyonic Quantum Field?

This was the question posed by Fred Alan Wolf, aka “Dr. Quantum.” Wolf speculates that the mind/soul may be an information field as perhaps envisioned by Plato—the platonic tachyonic quantum field (PTQ)—possibly what the ancients called the Akashic record, interacting with “real” matter fields. Though no material objects manifesting from appropriate quantum fields can travel at or faster than the speed of light, Wolf speculates that the putative platonic mind/soul exists as a PTQ that interacts with such slower-than-light-speed “real” matter through the intermediary of imaginal imaginary-mass objects—tachyons. It is the interaction between the PTQ and matter fields that leads to the physical world and the experience we know as mind/life force.

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Shirin Kaboli

Neurodynamics and Ecopsychology

Seán Ó Nualláin chaired this panel featuring talks by: Seán Ó Nualláin, Glenn Aparicio Parry, Sebastien Benthall, Anthony S. Wright, Tiff Thompson, and Shirin Kaboli. Seán Ó Nualláin described work done in conjunction with Karl Pribram between 1999 and 2002, modeling the brain as a harmonic oscillator. Glenn Aparicio Parry said a prayer, and spoke of remembering the true source of our consciousness. Sebastien Benthall described how social scientists are coming to terms with technology through critical algorithm studies and computational social sciences. Anthony S. Wright talked about transforming knowledge into wisdom, describing components of wisdom: flow, ethics, empathy, compassion, and flexibility. Tiff Thompson described her work in the field of EEG neurotherapy and psychodynamic psychotherapy. Shirin Kaboli presented her paper on wholeness and the implicate order in materials science, and its implications for consciousness studies.

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Wolfgang Baer


Observer Inclusive Physics

Henry Stapp

Henry Stapp

Wolfgang Baer chaired this panel seeking to explore the so-called “rose-colored glasses” effect, in which observer characteristics may be inadvertently assigned to observed systems. Papers were presented by: Wolfgang Baer, Henry Stapp, William Bushell, Eric Stanley Reiter, Michelle Kathryn McGee, Cynthia Sue Larson, and Shiva Meucci. Henry Stapp took a fresh look at a way of redesigning Daryl Bem’s ‘sensing the future’ experiment. William Bushell considered how long-term training in highly focused forms of observation potentially influence performance. Eric Stanley Reiter posed a challenge to quantum entanglement through experiment and theory. Michelle Kathryn McGee played with the intersection between matter and energy and light and dark. Cynthia Sue Larson examined evidence of complexity science in quantum phenomena.

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Beverly Rubik

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Peter Duesberg


Biology Panel and the Work of Peter Duesberg

Beverly Rubik chaired the biology session, which began with a keynote talk by Peter Duesberg, about his work on aneuploidy in cancer. Duesberg presented a case for carcinogenesis being a form of speciation. Peter argues that cancer involves aneuploidy—dysmorphia at the chromosomal level—rather than simple oncogenes. Beverly Rubik discussed her research on distant healing intention on plant growth. Phillip Shinnick discussed how science can help improve the human condition. Glen Rein described a nonlinear optical model of consciousness. Karla Galdamez discussed her research with photon-eye interaction.

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Cynthia Sue Larson, Tomoko Parry and Glenn Aparicio Parry

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Pre-conference informal social gathering

Interdisciplinary Exchange of Ideas

This third Foundations of Mind conference provided the opportunity for the exchange of ideas with presenters and attendees from many different countries and disciplines over the course of three days during conference proceedings, and at lunch and dinner breaks. From a delightful informal pre-conference gathering Wednesday night at Jupiter, to conference lunches at the International House and a post-conference dinner at Britt-Marie’s, this conference nurtured relationships with old friends and new!

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Corca Baiscin featuring vocalist Melanie O’Reilly, Jane Lenoir on flute, and Seán Ó Nualláin on guitar

One of the most memorable highlights of our last evening together was enjoying the musical performance of Corca Baiscin (pronouced Kurka Boshkin) featuring vocalist Melanie O’Reilly, Jane Lenoir on flute, Seán Ó Nualláin on guitar, and Deirdre McCarthy on percussion. “Kurka Boshkin/Corca Baiscin” combines an exhilarating sound of  Irish traditional music with a Celtic-Americana contemporary twist, interwoven with jazz improvisation. Inspired by Corca Baiscin, the name of the ancient territory now known as County Clare on the west coast of Ireland, the band inspired many of us to clap and sing along. You can hear a sample of Corca Baiscin playing “The Tamlin” in this video clip: https://youtu.be/6QycRVt8Xf8 and Melanie O’Reilly sing “The Diamond Rocks” here: https://youtu.be/mVRqR_pjVs0

Additional photos and news announcements from the Foundations of Mind III conference can be viewed at the Foundations of Mind facebook page.

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QuantumJumps300x150adCynthia Sue Larson is the best-selling author of six books, including Quantum Jumps. Cynthia has a degree in Physics from UC Berkeley, and discusses consciousness and quantum physics on numerous shows including the History Channel, Coast to Coast AM, the BBC and One World with Deepak Chopra. You can subscribe to Cynthia’s free monthly ezine at: https://www.RealityShifters.com
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What Is Fear of Abandonment and How to Overcome It

By Omar Cherif
https://collectie.boijmans.nl/en/collection/3275-%28mk%29My natural interest in psychology and philosophy drives me to read quite a lot about the subjects. Recently I came across a paper on Post Traumatic Stress Disorder of Abandonment. Fear of abandonment is something I knew of, yet have never delved enough to fully understand it. So I began researching.

In an Article by Susan Anderson, a psychotherapist and author of various self-help books, there was a 30-point list of characteristics of the disorder. By number 10, I suddenly felt a light bulb pop above my head. My eyes widened and proceeded to change positions to get closer to the screen. Aha.

I was familiar with many of those symptoms. Only that they are not mine, but belong to some of the people I knew throughout my life.

What I found even more fascinating is the significant number of comments from readers thanking the writer because she made them realize that whatever they were, and/or still are, suffering from is precisely related to their fear of abandonment —  a moment of epiphany for most; it truly hit home for them. They identified with the symptoms and shared their own stories, which were educational and, as usual, enlightening and full of insights.

As I kept skimming through the comments the light bulb got bigger and brighter. Splendid. It all makes sense now. How can one not love psychology. More personal examples reminded me by more people who, according to my new findings as well as some previous observations, must have unresolved abandonment issues.

As a fierce proponent of The Significance of Letting Go, I have written before about our attachment to others in Codependency: What Being Addicted to Someone Means. Also The Parable of the Cow: You Are Not Your Thoughts, which is a more philosophical one, discussing our attachment to thoughts in particular and the process of letting go of them.

After this enticing introduction, I felt drawn to shed some light on the topic of fear of abandonment, in hope to help more people identify the dire effects of clinging to pain caused by past memories. So I plugged the light bulb and turned it on.

What Is It?

Before getting to the causes and symptoms, we must first acknowledge the existence of a core, primal fear called fear of abandonment. It is widely proposed that the first taste of the feeling of abandonment begins when we were expelled from our warm mother’s womb towards the cold outside world.

As the children grow up, every time the parents get home late or have to travel their emotional attachment to them is shaken. As a source of their security and comfort, they fear for the safety of their parents, leaving feeling anxious and insecure during their absence.

Family ties are fundamental to our well-being. Depending on how we are brought up and how functional these ties are, one way or another we all grow up having some sort of fear of being abandoned — whether we are conscious of it or not. We all seem to worry that we’ll be left alone in the world to deal with life and its difficulties. How we react to that universal driving force depends from one person to another.

So fear of abandonment is a natural fear. But, if for some reason it reaches a certain intense degree that it begins affecting our judgment and behaviour, then it could turn problematic and become crippling.

In psychology, fear of abandonment is described as the irrational belief that one is in imminent danger of being personally rejected, discarded, or replaced. Abandoned Child Syndrome is one of the terms explaining the condition.

Fear, all kinds of fears, are detrimental to our health. Whether it’s from the unknown, or people, or situations, it is a fierce foe and a slayer of meaning, purpose, courage, and fulfilment. Naturally, living with fear can be so devastating that it often affects us on a biological level — activating the physical pain centres in the brain and leaving an emotional imprint in its warning system.

Fear of abandonment is no different; and it leads people to go through an emotional trauma characterised by a wide variety of symptoms, which cause harm to them and/or their loved ones.

Causes

During my research, I mainly came across two psychological terms related to fear of abandonment: Abandonment Child Syndrome and Post Traumatic Stress Disorder of Abandonment.

Let me first clarify a general difference.

A syndrome is the association of several clinically recognisable features, signs, symptoms, phenomena, or characteristics which often occur together, so that the presence of one feature alerts to the presence of the others. For example, Codependency or Borderline Personality Disorder going hand in hand with Abandonment Child Syndrome.

A disorder, on the other hand, is an abnormal physical or mental condition.

A disease remains a different thing altogether.

However, from reading about both, syndrome and disorder, I can see more similarities than differences. In our example here, the abandoned child syndrome is what could result from childhood issues with abandonment. Despite the fact that it is not recognised as a mental disorder, it has the future potential to turn into a PTSD of Abandonment.

For the sake of simplicity, I will keep referring to what we’re talking about here less formally as “Fear of Abandonment”, which could lead to a ACS and/or PTSD of Abandonment.

Now, the issues related to fear of abandonment typically begins during childhood through the loss of one or both parents or a caregiver due to death or divorce. The abandonment may be literal, as in physical — when the parent is not present in the child’s life (neglected or deserted), or when physically or sexually abused; it could be emotional — when the parent withholds love, nurturing, stimulation, or in the case of verbal and emotional abuse; or it could even be financial.

For children, any of these different degrees of early traumas can be one of the most anxiety-provoking situations in their lives. They could all cause deep-seated, lasting damage. Children tend to live in a black-and-white reality, so they carry the pain with them forever. Fortunately, the damage is reversible. Always, “There’s still time to change the road you’re on”, as Led Zeppelin remind us. And we’ll get to that later.

When the children grow up with an absent parent and/or inadequate physical or emotional care they often develop feelings of grief and blame themselves for their parent’s absence.
 In many cases, the trauma stays well into adulthood. The sufferer continues to believe and fear that every significant person in their life is going to abandon them in a similar way.

As mentioned, fearing abandonment is therefore often coupled with an exaggerated sense of dependency on another individual(s). People feel at a loss without the presence of a parent or a partner, which drives them to rush into relationships just so they are not alone.

This irrational fright of being abandoned causes our mammalian brain to perceive it as an attack on our personal being. As a way to protect us it reacts with fear. And when we feel trapped in a situation in which we have no control over for too long we tend to carry the dreadful weight over our shoulders throughout our lives. Even after the situation is over the fear remains. Just like all traumas, it could range from mild to severe, and we can always heal from it.

My interest, however, was not in the abused type, which I had formerly covered in the MK-Ultra piece. But rather, I was more into those less severe cases of people who have never acknowledged the existence of the wound. Or perhaps they did, but have never taken a step towards healing from the loss or rejection, possibly due to them blocking the pain. That was what my aha-moment about. Because it reminded by those I knew, old and young.

 

 

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About the Author:

Omar Cherif Omar Cherif is a trilingual writer and researcher, photographer and blogger with degrees in journalism, psychology, and philosophy. After working in the corporate world for ten years, he took writing as a vocation and is currently finalizing his first book about dreams, the subconscious mind, and spirituality among other topics.

You can follow Omar on Facebook and One Lucky Soul and you can check his Photography here.