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Yellowstone Rattled by Swarm of More Than 140 Earthquakes in Past Day, Geologists Say

Grand Prismatic Spring In Yellowstone National Park

By Maddie Capron | phys.org

A swarm of more than 141 earthquakes is rattling Yellowstone National Park, geologists said.

The U.S. Geological Survey said Friday that an ongoing earthquake swarm that began at 5:52 p.m. Thursday is centered beneath Yellowstone Lake. There have been 40 earthquakes bigger than a magnitude 2, and two have been above a 3.0 magnitude, USGS said.

In the past day, there have been 10 earthquakes with a 2.5 magnitude or greater, according to USGS. The largest was a 3.1-magnitude quake that shook beneath Yellowstone Lake at 8:12 a.m. Mountain Time.

The earthquake swarm is nothing to worry about, geologists said.

“Earthquake sequences like these are common and account for roughly 50% of the total seismicity in the Yellowstone region,” USGS said on Twitter. “This swarm is similar to one that occurred in about the same place during December 2020.”

Some people, however, still worry earthquakes in Yellowstone are a sign that the “supervolcano” that lies beneath the park will soon erupt, which could have regional and global consequences.

“Such a giant eruption would have regional effects such as falling ash and short-term (years to decades) changes to global climate,” USGS said on its website. “Those parts of the surrounding states of Montana, Idaho, and Wyoming that are closest to Yellowstone would be affected by pyroclastic flows, while other places in the United States would be impacted by falling ash (the amount of ash would decrease with distance from the eruption site).”

The USGS doesn’t think an eruption at Yellowstone is likely for thousands of years. Even with the current swarm, the alert level at the Yellowstone Volcano Observatory is green, which is normal.

Earthquakes in Yellowstone typically happen in swarms, according to the park. Swarms happen in many places where there is volcanic activity and occur for a number of reasons. The most common is when water gets into faults in the Earth’s crust, according to USGS.




A Volcanic Eruption 39 Million Years Ago Buried a Forest in Peru – Now the Petrified Trees are Revealing South America’s Primeval History

With the evidence uncovered by paleontologists, an artist sketched El Bosque Petrificado Piedra Chamana as it might have looked long before humans. Mariah Slovacek/NPS-GIP

In the hills outside the small village of Sexi, Peru, a fossil forest holds secrets about South America’s past millions of years ago.

When we first visited these petrified trees more than 20 years ago, not much was known about their age or how they came to be preserved. We started by dating the rocks and studying the volcanic processes that preserved the fossils. From there, we began to piece together the story of the forest, starting from the day 39 million years ago when a volcano erupted in northern Peru.

Ash rained down on the forest that day, stripping leaves from the trees. Then flows of ashy material moved through, breaking off the trees and carrying them like logs in a river to the area where they were buried and preserved. Millions of years later, after the modern-day Andes rose and carried the fossils with them, the rocks were exposed to the forces of erosion, and the fossil woods and leaves again saw the light of day.

This petrified forest, El Bosque Perificado Piedra Chamana, is the first fossil forest from the South American tropics to be studied in detail. It is helping paleontologists like us to understand the history of the megadiverse forests of the New World tropics and the past climates and environments of South America.

By examining thin slices of petrified wood under microscopes, we were able to map out the mix of trees that thrived here long before humans existed.

An artist's illustrations of each of the most common variety of trees found, plus cross-sections of the fossil wood as seen under a microscope

An artist’s illustrations of each of the most common variety of trees found, plus cross-sections of the fossil wood as seen under a microscope

Petrified wood under a microscope

To figure out the types of trees that had been growing in the forest before the eruption, we needed thin samples of the petrified wood that could be studied under a microscope. That was not so easy because of the volume and diversity of fossil wood at the site.

We tried to sample the diversity of the woods by relying on features that could be observed with the naked eye or with small hand-held microscopes, things like the arrangement and width of the vessels that carry water upwards within the tree or the presence of tree rings. Then we cut small blocks from the specimens, and from those, we were able to prepare petrographic thin sections in three planes. Each plane gives us a different view of the tree’s anatomy. They allow us to see many detailed features relating to the vessels, the wood fibers, and the living-tissue component of the wood.

Three magnified cross-sections from a tree fossil

Three magnified cross-sections from a tree fossil

Based on these features, we consulted past studies and used information in wood databases to find out what types of trees were present.

Clues in the woods and leaves

Many of the fossil trees have close relatives in the present-day lowland tropical forests of South America.

One has features typical of lianas, which are woody vines. Others appear to have been large canopy trees, including relatives of modern Ceiba. We also found trees well known in South America’s forests like Hura, or sandbox tree; Anacardium, a type of cashew tree; and Ochroma, or balsa. The largest specimen at the Sexi site – a fossil trunk about 2.5 feet (75 cm) in diameter – has features like those of Cynometra, a tree in the legume family.

The discovery of mangrove, Avicennia, was more evidence that the forest was growing at a low elevation near the sea before the Andes rose.

The fossil leaves we found provided another clue to the past. All had smooth edges, rather than the toothed edges or lobes that are more common in the cooler climates of the mid-to-high latitudes, indicating that the forest experienced quite warm conditions. We know the forest was growing at a time in the geologic past when the Earth was much warmer than today.

Fossilized leaves with clear detail.

Fossilized leaves with clear detail.

Although there are many similarities between the petrified forest and present-day Amazonian forests, some of the fossil trees have unusual anatomical features in the South American tropics. One is a species of Dipterocarpaceae, a group that has only one other representative in South America but that is common today in the rainforests of South Asia.

An artist brings the forest to life

Our concept of what this ancient forest was like expanded when we had an opportunity to collaborate with an artist at Florissant Fossil Beds National Monument in Colorado to reconstruct the forest and landscape. Other locations with fossil trees include Florissant, which has giant petrified redwood stumps, and Petrified Forest National Park in Arizona.

Working with the artist, Mariah Slovacek, who is also a paleontologist, made us think critically about many things: What would the forest have looked like? Were the trees evergreen or deciduous? Which were tall and which shorter? What would they have looked like in flower or fruit?

We knew from our investigation that many of the fossil trees were likely to have been growing in a streamside or flooded-forest location, but what about the vegetation growing back from the watercourses on higher ground? Would the hills have been forested or supported drier-adapted vegetation? Mariah researched today’s relatives of the trees we identified for clues to what they might have looked like, such as what shape and color their flowers or fruits might have been.

A large petrified log on open ground with rugged hills in the background

A large petrified log on open ground with rugged hills in the background

No fossils of mammals, birds, or reptiles from the same time period have been found at the Sexi site, but the ancient forest certainly would have supported a diversity of wildlife. Birds had diversified by that time, and reptiles in the crocodile family had long swum the tropical seas.

Recent paleontological discoveries found that two important groups of animals – monkeys and caviomorph rodents, which include guinea pigs – had arrived on the continent at about the time the fossil forest was growing.

With this information, Mariah was able to populate the ancient forest. The result is a lush, waterside forest of tall flowering trees and woody vines. Birds swoop through the air and crocodile splashes just offshore. You can almost imagine that you were there in the world of 39 million years ago.

This article is republished from The Conversation, a nonprofit news site dedicated to sharing ideas from academic experts. It was written by: Deborah WoodcockClark University, and Herb MeyerNational Park Service.

Authors

Research Scientist, Clark University

Deborah Woodcock has received funding from the American Philosophical Society, the National Science Foundation, and National Geographic.

Paleontologist, National Park Service

Herb Meyer has been supported in this project as an employee of the National Park Service, with additional funding provided by The Friends of the Florissant Fossil Beds, the National Science Foundation, and National Geographic.




Couple Discovers Massive, Sprawling ‘Lava Tube’ Cave Underneath Oregon Home

By | The Mind Unleashed

When a realtor warned Suzanne and James Brierley of Bend, Oregon, that their new property had a small cave located somewhere, the couple was hardly concerned.

However, since then the homeowners have discovered that this wasn’t just any cave but was a huge lava tube large enough to stand in, reports KTVZ.

The lava tube takes the form of a small hole in the side of a hill, but once one enters, the lava tube is stunningly huge – with some parts of the cave high enough for the Brierleys to not even be able to reach their ceiling.

Lava tubes are natural formations that are created when flowing lava escapes an underground volcanic vent.

Essentially a cave, these tubes once carried magma from eruptions out to sea before cooling and typically collapsing. However, many old lava tubes remain and are popular with some hikers.

In places like Hawaii’s Big Island, lava tubes are everywhere and are home to species adapted to these unique locations. Native Hawaiians also interred their dead in the caves and used them for spiritual purposes.

However, according to local experts, the sprawling cave underneath the Brierleys’ property – or the huge complex of caves in the area – hasn’t yet been fully explored.

Either way, the couple is now looking to sell the property. Considering that it includes such an alluring find underneath, it’s likely that they’ll have no shortage of prospective buyers.




Speaking to the Water with Pat McCabe

Video Source:  UPLIFT

A powerful story about how to tap into the magic and mystery of water from Pat McCabe, a Navajo and Lakota activist.



Chemical Memory in Plants Affects Chances of Offspring Survival

By Science Daily 

Researchers at the University of Warwick have uncovered the mechanism that allows plants to pass on their ‘memories’ to offspring, which results in growth and developmental defects.

In order to survive and thrive, plants have the unique capability to sense and remember changes in their environment. This is linked to the chemical modification of DNA and histone proteins, which alters the way in which DNA is packaged within the cell’s nucleus and genes are expressed — a process known as epigenetic regulation.

Usually, this epigenetic information is reset during sexual reproduction to erase any inappropriate ‘memories’ from being passed on to ensure the offspring grows normally. In the paper, ‘A new role for histone demethylases in the maintenance of plant genome integrity’ published in the journal elife, it was found that some plants were unable to forget this information and passed it on to their offspring, thereby affecting their chances of survival.

The researchers identified two proteins in Thale Cress (Arabidopsis), previously known only to control the initiation and timing of flowering, that are also responsible for controlling ‘plant memory’ through the chemical modification (demethylation) of histone proteins.

They showed that plants unable to reset these chemical marks during sexual reproduction, passed on this ‘memory’ to subsequent generations, resulting in defects in growth and development.

Some of these defects were linked to the activation of selfish DNA elements, also known as ‘jumping genes’ or transposons, thus indicating that the erasure of such ‘memory’ is also critical for maintaining the integrity of plant genomes by silencing transposons.

Prof. Jose Gutierrez-Marcos, a senior author on the paper from the School of Life Sciences at the University of Warwick commented:

“Our study into the proteins that regulate plant memory has shown how important it is for chemical marks to be reset during sexual reproduction in order to avoid offspring inheriting inappropriate ‘memories’ that lead to growth and developmental defects associated with genome instability.

“The next step is to work out how to manipulate such ‘memories’ for plant breeding purposes, so that subsequent generations show greater adaptability to allow them to thrive in a changing environment.”


Story Source:

Materials provided by University of WarwickNote: Content may be edited for style and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. Javier Antunez-Sanchez, Matthew Naish, Juan Sebastian Ramirez-Prado, Sho Ohno, Ying Huang, Alexander Dawson, Korawit Opassathian, Deborah Manza-Mianza, Federico Ariel, Cecile Raynaud, Anjar Wibowo, Josquin Daron, Minako Ueda, David Latrasse, R Keith Slotkin, Detlef Weigel, Moussa Benhamed, Jose Gutierrez-Marcos. A new role for histone demethylases in the maintenance of plant genome integrityeLife, 2020; 9 DOI: 10.7554/eLife.58533



Tel Aviv University Study Finds Hyperbaric Oxygen Treatments Reverse Aging Process

By AMERICAN FRIENDS OF TEL AVIV UNIVERSITY | EurekAlert

First clinical trial reverses two biological processes associated with aging in human cells

The researchers found that a unique protocol of treatments with high-pressure oxygen in a pressure chamber can reverse two major processes associated with aging and its illnesses: the shortening of telomeres (protective regions located at both ends of every chromosome) and the accumulation of old and malfunctioning cells in the body. Focusing on immune cells containing DNA obtained from the participants’ blood, the study discovered a lengthening of up to 38% of the telomeres, as well as a decrease of up to 37% in the presence of senescent cells.

The study was led by Professor Shai Efrati of the Sackler School of Medicine and the Sagol School of Neuroscience at TAU and Founder and Director of the Sagol Center of Hyperbaric Medicine at the Shamir Medical Center; and Dr. Amir Hadanny, Chief Medical Research Officer of the Sagol Center for Hyperbaric Medicine and Research at the Shamir Medical Center. The clinical trial was conducted as part of a comprehensive Israeli research program that targets aging as a reversible condition.

The paper was published in Aging on November 18, 2020.

“For many years our team has been engaged in hyperbaric research and therapy – treatments based on protocols of exposure to high-pressure oxygen at various concentrations inside a pressure chamber,” Professor Efrati explains. “Our achievements over the years included the improvement of brain functions damaged by age, stroke or brain injury.

“In the current study we wished to examine the impact of HBOT on healthy and independent aging adults, and to discover whether such treatments can slow down, stop or even reverse the normal aging process at the cellular level.”

The researchers exposed 35 healthy individuals aged 64 or over to a series of 60 hyperbaric sessions over a period of 90 days. Each participant provided blood samples before, during and at the end of the treatments as well as some time after the series of treatments concluded. The researchers then analyzed various immune cells in the blood and compared the results.

The findings indicated that the treatments actually reversed the aging process in two of its major aspects: The telomeres at the ends of the chromosomes grew longer instead of shorter, at a rate of 20%-38% for the different cell types; and the percentage of senescent cells in the overall cell population was reduced significantly – by 11%-37% depending on cell type.

“Today telomere shortening is considered the ‘Holy Grail’ of the biology of aging,” Professor Efrati says. “Researchers around the world are trying to develop pharmacological and environmental interventions that enable telomere elongation. Our HBOT protocol was able to achieve this, proving that the aging process can in fact be reversed at the basic cellular-molecular level.”

[Read more here]

Robert O’Leary, JD BARA, has had an abiding interest in alternative health products & modalities since the early 1970’s & he has seen how they have made people go from lacking health to vibrant health. He became an attorney, singer-songwriter, martial artist & father along the way and brings that experience to his practice as a BioAcoustic Soundhealth Practitioner, under the tutelage of the award-winning founder of BioAcoustic Biology, Sharry Edwards, whose Institute of BioAcoustic Biology has now been serving clients for 30 years with a non-invasive & safe integrative modality that supports the body’s ability to self-heal using the power of the human voice. Robert brings this modality to serve clients in Greater Springfield, Massachusetts and New England (USA) & “virtually” the world. He can also be reached at romayasoundhealthandbeauty@gmail.

 




The Language of Nature: Plants Communicate With Each Other to Send Alerts About Incoming Pests

By  | Science.News

When they’re under attack, plants send warning signals, says a recent study published in Current Biology. These signals come in the form of airborne natural chemicals, called volatile organic compounds (VOCs), which alert neighboring plants to a threat.

But this is not merely an altruistic act, suggested researchers. It’s mutually beneficial as the receiving plants also emit these chemical defenses back, which compel the invading pest to leave the area. What’s more, genetically different plants emit VOCs that become more similar when plants are exposed to a threat.

“So, they kind of converge on the same language, or the same warning signs, to share the information freely,” said Andre Kessler, a professor of ecology and evolutionary biology at Cornell University.

Plant communication is mutually beneficial

Goldenrod, a genus of several species of flowering plants in the aster family, is one of the plants known to communicate by releasing VOCs when they’re under attack. But it’s still unclear what drives plants to emit the chemicals. The act might not be intentional at all, a byproduct of leaf damage. On the other hand, it could be purposely done as a matter of survival.

There are two prominent hypotheses for the latter. The kin selection hypothesis states that the emitting plant indirectly benefits from releasing VOCs as genetically related plants in the vicinity have a higher chance of survival. This boosts the reproductive success of its kind. Meanwhile, the mutual benefit hypothesis posits that the emitting plant directly benefits from the signaling as the preemptive chemical defenses launched by all its neighbors, whether of close kin or not, result in a hostile environment that drives the invading pest away.

The researchers wanted to test these hypotheses, and to do so, they experimented on one goldenrod species, Solidago altissima. They grew two sets of plants, one of which descended from goldenrods that were routinely sprayed with insecticides. Then, the plants were exposed to beetles.

Results seemed to support the two hypotheses. The VOCs emitted by the insecticide group induced responses only from genetically identical goldenrods – consistent with the kin selection hypothesis. On the other hand, the VOCs emitted by goldenrods whose predecessors were not sprayed with insecticide induced responses from all the other goldenrod plants near them, including plants that weren’t genetically identical to them – consistent with the mutual benefit hypothesis.

Upon further analysis, the researchers found that the receiving plants gave off the same chemical signals regardless of whether they were genetically identical to the emitter plant or not. In turn, higher amounts of VOCs could benefit plants under attack by providing either a stronger deterrent against an invading insect or a stronger attraction for its natural enemies.

“The exchange of information becomes independent of how closely related the plant is to its neighbor,” said Kessler. He added that the goldenrods went through chemical and metabolic changes in a bid to repel attackers. “It’s very much like our immune system: though plants don’t have antibodies as we have, they can fight back with pretty nasty chemistry.”

However, this “open-channel communication” seemed to occur only among the plants with a history of herbivory – the insecticide group did not display such signal convergence. Instead, they kept a private channel among their closest kin. For this reason, the researchers said that plant-to-plant communication likely evolved out of the threat posed by insect herbivory. (Related: Plants saving plants: A mixture of plant extracts and emulsifiers found to suppress disease-causing fungus.)

The findings of the study could have practical applications in agriculture. According to Kessler, plant-to-plant interaction has been explored before to find new methods of crop protection. Learning how to use VOCs effectively could help turn on the natural defenses of plants and crops.

Sources include:

ScienceDaily.com

TheScientist.com

Cell.com




A Gift For All of Us: a Falcon In the Garden

A Magical Moment

To see something extraordinary three times is a blessing, and a message, and a gift.  An extraordinary thing happened the other day that was such a good sign and omen, that I know you’ll just love it.
When I looked out the front window, I saw a giant falcon fly into our Gravenstein apple tree, and perch on the lowest branch, only a few feet off the ground.  This bird looked like a peregrine falcon to me, with distinctive striped/dappled patterns on its golden chest and on both sides, giant yellow-orange talons (that seemed as big as its head) and a beautiful, curved beak.  It was watching activity at our neighbor’s house across the street, where tree trimmers had been clearing branches away from overhead electrical lines.  There was a pile of branches in front of our neighbor’s driveway–and a mother and her young son had stopped to look at all the branches.  The falcon watched all this with great interest, settling into our apple tree where it remained for about 10 minutes or so.
The falcon’s head swiveled around to see me watching it–even though I was inside the house, about ten feet away from the window.  I was amazed to see how alert and aware this bird was, and how keen its vision must be.  After the falcon had rested in our apple tree for about ten minutes, it flew directly toward me (!!!) and then just up above me, to the right, to sit atop the roof over our front porch!  It saw me watching it from a respectful distance inside the house.  I could tell it was watching my every move, since any time I made even the slightest movement, the falcon swiveled its head to stare at me intently.  The falcon also kept a close eye on our front yard, no doubt aware that we have a gopher who burrows there regularly.
After many minutes of sitting on the porch roof, the falcon flew off toward our backyard.  I went to look out the kitchen window, and a few minutes later, the falcon flew right toward me a second time, (!!!) so I got a perfect view of its beautiful golden breast and outstretched wings–and then it flew up over the roof of our house.  I returned to the living room, to see if I could spot it in the front yard, but saw no sign of it.  I then returned to the kitchen a few minutes later, when I saw the falcon fly directly toward me a third time (!!!)–looking at me as it approached the house, and then landed atop our front porch roof once more.
This falcon was so gorgeous in full flight, and so regal when keeping watch on the yard, but the it’s most remarkable quality was how much love I could palpably feel from being in the presence of this beautiful bird.  I was especially overwhelmed with how much love it had shown me by flying directly toward me, while looking me in the eye, THREE times that afternoon.  I see a lot of birds in our garden, including crows, bluejays, house finches, and hummingbirds–and in the entire 30 plus years I’ve lived here, yesterday was the first time a bird ever flew directly toward me while looking right at me the whole time.  Only one other bird has flown up to a window and peered in at me on the other side, and that was a hummingbird several years ago, who seemed to be saying “Thank you!” to me, for having refilled the nectar in the hummingbird feeder.  This summer I’ve also had a few hummingbirds hover close to me, and sometimes fly into a spray of water when I’m watering the yard.  All of those moments are memorable, indeed, but this felt truly exceptional.
This bird looked like a young peregrine falcon.  Peregrine falcons have been my favorite bird ever since I was a little girl, and saw one in a children’s book.  I’d been watching three baby peregrine falcons that hatched this Spring up at the top of UC Berkeley’s campanile tower, where a Cal falcons camera monitor showed livestream video from their nesting box from the time their mother sat on the eggs, to the time the young peregrine’s flight feathers came in, and up until their very first practice flights.

Blessing, Message, and Gift

There was so much love in this bird’s visit that I spent quite a bit of time just soaking it in.  This falcon had a truly majestic presence, and in addition to that, it seemed especially attuned with me–the way it flew directly toward me while clearly seeing me (inside my house) three times in a row.  I am aware that to see something extraordinary three times is a blessing, and a message, and a gift.
What I’d been doing in the days before the peregrine’s visit was honoring the memory of my dear beloved deceased friend and mentor, the American linguist, Dan “Moonhawk” Alford.  Moonhawk often described himself as hanging out
“at the lonely intersection of language, physics, Native America and consciousness,”
and the few precious hours I spent hanging out with him at my first Language of Spirit conference in New Mexico was life-changing for me.  Moonhawk has a way of illuminating important ideas, such as how language shapes consciousness, and he has a genius for inspiring people to think differently.  Moonhawk pointed out how it might be, for example, that in Nature, “A does not always equal A,” because
“you can never step into the same river twice.”
Such a seemingly simple point gets to the heart of how our western science and logic was constructed with a mechanistic bias, while the natural world is ever-changing, generous, alive and profound.
Another mind-expanding point that Moonhawk made is that our English language is noun-based, which affects our view of the cosmos.  Moonhawk pointed out that he’s spent time with Native Americans who could talk for hours, or even for an entire day, without once uttering a single noun.  Such a thing is mind-blowing to most westerners, whose thoughts shape the way they think to an extraordinary degree.  Even the idea of God is a verb to Native Americans, and this mental conceptualization of reality is so different from typical western reductionist viewpoints, yet such a perfect match for quantum physicists, such as David Bohm, who’d met with Moonhawk and Leroy Little Bear at a special dialogue hosted by the Fetzer Institute in Michigan in 1992.
I’d been reading Moonhawk’s articles on his website, after having watched a DVD documentary film honoring him and physicist David Bohm and Blackfoot indian Leroy Little Bear, called “The Language of Spirituality” this weekend.  I’d been talking with Moonhawk in my heart for the past several days–hearing his jokes, witticisms, and responses in my heart–so it feels right that Moonhawk’s spirit is so with me.  And indeed the peregrine falcon’s visit was a blessing, a message, and a gift.
As always, I encourage us all to keep asking my favorite question, “How good can it get?”
I invite you to watch the companion video to this blog post at:

 

___________________________

QuantumJumps300x150adCynthia Sue Larson is the best-selling author of six books, including Quantum Jumps.  Cynthia has a degree in physics from UC Berkeley, an MBA degree, a Doctor of Divinity, and a second degree black belt in Kuk Sool Won. Cynthia is the founder of RealityShifters, and is president of the International Mandela Effect Conference. Cynthia hosts “Living the Quantum Dream” on the DreamVisions7 radio network, and has been featured in numerous shows including Gaia, the History Channel, Coast to Coast AM, One World with Deepak Chopra, and BBC. Cynthia reminds us to ask in every situation, “How good can it get?” Subscribe to her free monthly ezine at:
RealityShifters®



How the Human Heart Functions as a Second Brain

Jacqueline & Pao Chang | Waking Times

The word “heart” is an anagram for the word “earth”. Hence, the phrase “home is where the heart is”.

Did you know that the human heart is the organ that generates the strongest electromagnetic field of any organ of the human body? In fact, the electromagnetic field of your heart can be measured up to a few feet away from your body. Furthermore, this energy field changes in relation to your emotions. One thing you should know about the electromagnetic field is that every organ and cell in your body generates an energy field.

Because the heart generates the strongest electromagnetic field, the information stored in its electromagnetic field affects every organ and cell in your body. Could this be why the heart is the first organ to function in a fetus? Besides generating the strongest electromagnetic field, the heart has an intelligence of its own, which is why certain neuroradiologists refer to it as the heart-brain or the fifth brain.

According to neuroradiologists, the heart is not only made of muscle cells but also neurons. Researchers at the Institute of HeartMath have done experiments proving that the heart’s role is not limited to just pumping blood. They believe it has intelligence and plays a major role in the perception of reality.

Related Article: This Short Meditation Will Relax You & Center You in Your Heart

Here is an excerpt from my book Staradigm that talks about the deeper roles of the heart:

The heart is one of the most important organs in the human body because it is one of the main mediums for connecting us to each other and the Universe. Conventional science has taught us that the main role of the heart is to pump blood to all the systems of the body. This definition of the heart is not very accurate. Besides pumping blood, the heart also has an intelligence of its own.

According to neuroradiologists, 60 to 65 percent of heart cells are neuron cells, not muscle cells.1This discovery has helped them to develop experiments that have proved the heart works similar to the brain and in some ways is even superior to the brain. This may be the reason why the heart is the first organ to function after conception. Within about 20 days after conception, the heart starts to function, but the brain does not function until after roughly 90 days. This information tells us that the brain is secondary to the heart.

The Heart, Brain, and Feelings

The brain and the heart are sometimes said to work in opposition. We are constantly trying to determine whether to place more emphasis on our thoughts or feelings. Rational people would say that the mind is the key to keeping us out of trouble, as the mind thinks in terms of what has the most payoff and is quite possible the safest or most calculated risk.

The heart, on the other hand, allows us to feel what is best at an internal level that connects to our intuition. Operating with either one of these alone, only the mind or the heart can sometimes lead us into trouble. The mind can be afraid to seek happiness outside of the comfort zone, and the heart sometimes urges decisions that are unknown and risky, but using the two in balance can bring great clarity to a person.

Related Article: Open Your Heart Chakra with This Simple Yoga Pose

Follow the heart is a common phrase that is tossed around, but it is not necessarily easy to enact. Follow the heart means letting deep feelings draw us one way or another without a logical answer or obvious reasoning. This organ provides a feeling of intuition or guidance, but we must have the contentment and the confidence to understand when it is pushing us in a direction, and then act upon this with complete faith in the outcome. Our feelings are what help us to understand the world beyond logic and therefore they are the keys to understanding the spiritual aspects of ourselves.

The Intelligence of the Heart

Some researchers and neuroradiologists are pushing the idea that the heart can actually act like another brain, helping to guide us with a different form of intelligence. Many physiological studies are currently being done regarding the interconnection of the heart and the brain, and why certain sensations and feelings are experienced at the level of the heart. Generally, love and certain emotional states are felt at the heart level, producing different physiological reactions of the heart.

Heartbeats have been found to be affected by inner states and emotions, including disorder in heart rhythms when we are experiencing stress or negative emotion. Conversely, when we are feeling positive, the heart rhythms are more cohesive and beat more regularly and steadily.

The nervous system of the heart contains roughly 40,000 neurons or sensory neurites. One of its roles is to monitor the heart’s hormones, neurochemicals, heart rate, and pressure information. The information about how these chemicals behave is also sent to the brain. The heart and brain are always communicating through the vagus nerve system and the electromagnetic field of the body. It is through this dynamic communication process that the consciousness of the heart can change how the brain process information. This process can also affect how energy flows in the body.

These findings indicate that the heart works with the brain and body, including the amygdala, to process emotions and incorporate emotional memories. The amygdala is the part of the brain that assists us in making decisions about incoming information and processing them based on our past experiences. This shows a link between the emotions and feelings and the actual brain and body physiology.

Other mental attitudes and stress also affect the body and our overall health, and these issues can be linked to the heart as well. Recent scientific research has determined that the emotions of anger, anxiety, and other negative feelings can significantly increase the risk of heart disease. Therefore, stressful situations and high anxiety levels negatively affect the heart as an organ.

Connecting the brain and the heart as its own emotional processing center is a topic that many researchers are focusing on. It has been shown that emotions experienced mentally will also manifest physically in the body, and feelings can affect the rhythms and beating of the heart. The best way to maintain a healthy heart is to not only eat a healthy diet but also incorporate meditation techniques to balance the energy of the heart and brain.

Why the Heart Holds the key to World Peace

The heart helps us to understand the world through feelings. It allows us to understand our reality in a universal kind of way, giving us universal characteristics. This biological electromagnetic field generator allows us to understand each other at the emotional level and beyond, giving us a sense of connection to all things. This emotional connection is what creates bonding between individuals.

When we learn how to think with our hearts, it becomes easier for us to understand others and live in harmony with them. For these reasons, the heart holds the key to uniting humanity and achieving world peace.

About the Author

Pao L. Chang is the author and founder of OmniThought.org and EnergyFanatics.com. His main goal is to empower you with the knowledge that is beyond the conventional paradigm to help free your mind and increase your spiritual well-being to a whole new level




Collecting Clean Water From Air, Inspired By Desert Life

New studies show options for gathering water from fog, condensation

By Laura Arenschield, Ohio State University

Humans can get by in the most basic of shelters, can scratch together a meal from the most humble of ingredients. But we can’t survive without clean water. And in places where water is scarce—the world’s deserts, for example—getting water to people requires feats of engineering and irrigation that can be cumbersome and expensive.

A pair of new studies from researchers at Ohio State University offers a possible solution, inspired by nature.

“We thought: ‘How can we gather water from the ambient air around us?’” said Bharat Bhushan, Ohio Eminent Scholar and Howard D. Winbigler Professor of mechanical engineering at Ohio State. “And so, we looked to the things in nature that already do that: the cactus, the beetle, desert grasses.”

Their findings were published Dec. 24 in the journal Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society. The works were co-authored with Ohio State Ph.D. student Dev Gurera and with Ohio State engineering researcher Dong Song.

Bhushan’s work focuses on finding nature-inspired solutions to societal problems. In this case, his research team looked to the desert to find a life that survives despite limited access to water.

The cactus, beetle and desert grasses all collect water condensed from nighttime fog, gathering droplets from the air and filtering them to roots or reservoirs, providing enough hydration to survive.

Drops of water collect on wax-free, water-repellant bumps on a beetle’s back, then slide toward the beetle’s mouth on the flat surface between the bumps. Desert grasses collect water at their tips, then channel the water toward their root systems via channels in each blade. A cactus collects water on its barbed tips before guiding droplets down conical spines to the base of the plant.

Bhushan’s team studied each of these living things and realized they could build a similar—albeit larger—system to allow humans to pull water from nighttime fog or condensation.

They started studying the ways by which different surfaces might collect water, and which surfaces might be the most efficient. Using 3D printers, they built surfaces with bumps and barbs, then created enclosed, foggy environments using a commercial humidifier to see which system gathered the most water.

READ THE REST OF THE ARTICLE…




How Nature Can Make You Kinder, Happier, and More Creative

backpack mountains nature-compressed

By Jill Suttie | Greater Good Magazine

We are spending more time indoors and online. But recent studies suggest that nature can help our brains and bodies to stay healthy.

I’ve been an avid hiker my whole life. From the time I first strapped on a backpack and headed into the Sierra Nevada Mountains, I was hooked on the experience, loving the way being in nature cleared my mind and helped me to feel more grounded and peaceful.

But, even though I’ve always believed that hiking in nature had many psychological benefits, I’ve never had much science to back me up…until now, that is. Scientists are beginning to find evidence that being in nature has a profound impact on our brains and our behavior, helping us to reduce anxiety, brooding and stress, and increase our attention capacity, creativity, and our ability to connect with other people.

Related Article: The Frequency of Life: Getting Back to Nature For Good Health

“People have been discussing their profound experiences in nature for the last several 100 years—from Thoreau to John Muir to many other writers,” says researcher David Strayer, of the University of Utah. “Now we are seeing changes in the brain and changes in the body that suggest we are physically and mentally more healthy when we are interacting with nature.”

While he and other scientists may believe nature benefits our well-being, we live in a society where people spend more and more time indoors and online—especially children. Findings on how nature improves our brains bring added legitimacy to the call for preserving natural spaces—both urban and wild—and for spending more time in nature in order to lead healthier, happier, and more creative lives.

Here are some of the ways that science is showing how being in nature affects our brains and bodies.

mountain walk

1. Being in nature decreases stress

It’s clear that hiking—and any physical activity—can reduce stress and anxiety. But, there’s something about being in nature that may augment those impacts.

In one recent experiment conducted in Japan, participants were assigned to walk either in a forest or in an urban center (taking walks of equal length and difficulty) while having their heart rate variability, heart rate, and blood pressure measured. The participants also filled out questionnaires about their moods, stress levels, and other psychological measures.

Results showed that those who walked in forests had significantly lower heart rates and higher heart rate variability (indicating more relaxation and less stress), and reported better moods and less anxiety, than those who walked in urban settings. The researchers concluded that there’s something about being in nature that had a beneficial effect on stress reduction, above and beyond what exercise alone might have produced.

In another study, researchers in Finland found that urban dwellers who strolled for as little as 20 minutes through an urban park or woodland reported significantly more stress relief than those who strolled in a city center.

The reasons for this effect are unclear, but scientists believe that we evolved to be more relaxed in natural spaces. In a now-classic laboratory experiment by Roger Ulrich of Texas A&M University and colleagues, participants who first viewed a stress-inducing movie, and were then exposed to color/sound videotapes depicting natural scenes, showed much quicker, more complete recovery from stress than those who’d been exposed to videos of urban settings.

These studies and others provide evidence that being in natural spaces— or even just looking out of a window onto a natural scene—somehow soothes us and relieves stress.

2. Nature makes you happier and less brooding

I’ve always found that hiking in nature makes me feel happier, and of course, decreased stress may be a big part of the reason why. But, Gregory Bratman, of Stanford University, has found evidence that nature may impact our mood in other ways, too.

In one 2015 study, he and his colleagues randomly assigned 60 participants to a 50-minute walk in either a natural setting (oak woodlands) or an urban setting (along a four-lane road). Before and after the walk, the participants were assessed on their emotional state and on cognitive measures, such as how well they could perform tasks requiring short-term memory. Results showed that those who walked in nature experienced less anxiety, rumination (focused attention on negative aspects of oneself), and negative affect, as well as more positive emotions, in comparison to the urban walkers. They also improved their performance on memory tasks.

In another study, he and his colleagues extended these findings by zeroing in on how walking in nature affects rumination—which has been associated with the onset of depression and anxiety—while also using fMRI technology to look at brain activity. Participants who took a 90-minute walk in either a natural setting or an urban setting had their brains scanned before and after their walks and were surveyed on self-reported rumination levels (as well as other psychological markers). The researchers controlled for many potential factors that might influence rumination or brain activity—for example, physical exertion levels as measured by heart rates and pulmonary functions.

Even so, participants who walked in a natural setting versus an urban setting reported decreased rumination after the walk, and they showed increased activity in the subgenual prefrontal cortex, an area of the brain whose deactivation is affiliated with depression and anxiety—a finding that suggests nature may have important impacts on mood.

Bratman believes results like these need to reach city planners and others whose policies impact our natural spaces. “Ecosystem services are being incorporated into decision making at all levels of public policy, land use planning, and urban design, and it’s very important to be sure to incorporate empirical findings from psychology into these decisions,” he says.

GRAND CANYON

3. Nature relieves attention fatigue and increases creativity.

Today, we live with ubiquitous technology designed to constantly pull for our attention. But many scientists believe our brains were not made for this kind of information bombardment, and that it can lead to mental fatigue, overwhelm, and burnout, requiring “attention restoration” to get back to a normal, healthy state.

Strayer is one of those researchers. He believes that being in nature restores depleted attention circuits, which can then help us be more open to creativity and problem-solving.

“When you use your cell phone to talk, text, shoot photos, or whatever else you can do with your cell phone, you’re tapping the prefrontal cortex and causing reductions in cognitive resources,” he says.

In a 2012 study, he and his colleagues showed that hikers on a four-day backpacking trip could solve significantly more puzzles requiring creativity when compared to a control group of people waiting to take the same hike—in fact, 47 percent more. Although other factors may account for his results—for example, the exercise or the camaraderie of being out together—prior studies have suggested that nature itself may play an important role. One in Psychological Science found that the impact of nature on attention restoration is what accounted for improved scores on cognitive tests for the study participants.

This phenomenon may be due to differences in brain activation when viewing natural scenes versus more built-up scenes—even for those who normally live in an urban environment. In a recent study conducted by Peter Aspinall at Heriot-Watt University, Edinburgh, and colleagues, participants who had their brains monitored continuously using mobile electroencephalogram (EEG) while they walked through an urban green space had brain EEG readings indicating lower frustration, engagement, and arousal, and higher meditation levels while in the green area, and higher engagement levels when moving out of the green area. This lower engagement and arousal may be what allows for attention restoration, encouraging a more open, meditative mindset.

It’s this kind of brain activity—sometimes referred to as “the brain default network”—that is tied to creative thinking, says Strayer. He is currently repeating his earlier 2012 study with a new group of hikers and recording their EEG activity and salivary cortisol levels before, during, and after a three-day hike. Early analyses of EEG readings support the theory that hiking in nature seems to rest people’s attention networks and to engage their default networks.

Strayer and colleagues are also specifically looking at the effects of technology by monitoring people’s EEG readings while they walk in an arboretum, either while talking on their cell phone or not. So far, they’ve found that participants with cell phones appear to have EEG readings consistent with attention overload, and can recall only half as many details of the arboretum they just passed through, compared to those who were not on a cell phone.

Though Strayer’s findings are preliminary, they are consistent with other people’s findings on the importance of nature to attention restoration and creativity.

“If you’ve been using your brain to multitask—as most of us do most of the day—and then you set that aside and go on a walk, without all of the gadgets, you’ve let the prefrontal cortex recover,” says Strayer. “And that’s when we see these bursts in creativity, problem-solving, and feelings of well-being.”

family hike

4. Nature may help you to be kind and generous

Whenever I go to places like Yosemite or the Big Sur Coast of California, I seem to return to my home life ready to be more kind and generous to those around me—just ask my husband and kids! Now some new studies may shed light on why that is.

In a series of experiments published in 2014, Juyoung Lee, GGSC director Dacher Keltner, and other researchers at the University of California, Berkeley, studied the potential impact of nature on the willingness to be generous, trusting, and helpful toward others, while considering what factors might influence that relationship.

As part of their study, the researchers exposed participants to more or less subjectively beautiful nature scenes (whose beauty levels were rated independently) and then observed how participants behaved playing two economics games—the Dictator Game and the Trust Game—that measure generosity and trust, respectively. After being exposed to the more beautiful nature scenes, participants acted more generously and more trusting in the games than those who saw less beautiful scenes, and the effects appeared to be due to corresponding increases in positive emotion.

In another part of the study, the researchers asked people to fill out a survey about their emotions while sitting at a table where more or less beautiful plants were placed. Afterward, the participants were told that the experiment was over and they could leave, but that if they wanted to they could volunteer to make paper cranes for a relief effort program in Japan. The number of cranes they made (or didn’t make) was used as a measure of their “prosociality” or willingness to help.

Related Article: Creating Connection: Finding Balance Between Nature and Man.

Results showed that the presence of more beautiful plants significantly increased the number of cranes made by participants and that this increase was, again, mediated by positive emotion elicited by natural beauty. The researchers concluded that experiencing the beauty of nature increases positive emotion—perhaps by inspiring awe, a feeling akin to wonder, with the sense of being part of something bigger than oneself—which then leads to prosocial behaviors.

Support for this theory comes from an experiment conducted by Paul Piff of the University of California, Irvine, and colleagues, in which participants staring up a grove of very tall trees for as little as one minute experienced measurable increases in awe, and demonstrated more helpful behavior and approached moral dilemmas more ethically, than participants who spent the same amount of time looking up at a high building.

nature-hike

5. Nature makes you “feel more alive”

With all of these benefits to being out in nature, it’s probably no surprise that something about nature makes us feel more alive and vital. Being outdoors gives us energy, makes us happier, helps us to relieve the everyday stresses of our overscheduled lives, opens the door to creativity, and helps us to be kind to others.

No one knows if there is an ideal amount of nature exposure, though Strayer says that longtime backpackers suggest a minimum of three days to really unplug from our everyday lives. Nor can anyone say for sure how nature compares to other forms of stress relief or attention restoration, such as sleep or meditation. Both Strayer and Bratman say we need a lot more careful research to tease out these effects before we come to any definitive conclusions.

Still, the research does suggest there’s something about nature that keeps us psychologically healthy, and that’s good to know…especially since nature is a resource that’s free and that many of us can access by just walking outside our door. Results like these should encourage us as a society to consider more carefully how we preserve our wilderness spaces and our urban parks.

And while the research may not be conclusive, Strayer is optimistic that science will eventually catch up to what people like me have intuited all along—that there’s something about nature that renews us, allowing us to feel better, to think better, and to deepen our understanding of ourselves and others.

“You can’t have centuries of people writing about this and not have something going on,” says Strayer. “If you are constantly on a device or in front of a screen, you’re missing out on something that’s pretty spectacular: the real world.”

mountains of awe
About The Author

Jill Suttie, Psy.D., is Greater Good‘s book review editor and a frequent contributor to the magazine.




The Illusion of Time – Are We a SLAVE to Something That Doesn’t Exist?

Why bother being concerned about running out of time, if time doesn’t exist to begin with?

The idea that time is an illusion counts among one of the most highly debated theories of our time.That said, the idea that time is merely a manmade construct – seconds, minutes, hours, days, and so on might become more plausible when looking at this one (very crude) but obvious example.

Daylight Saving Time!

How is it that a group of individuals (i.e. Governments) can decide whether to implement what has become known as daylight saving time (DST), and just like magic our entire lives conform around a set time that was simply constructed by agreement?

This to me is probably one of the most obvious, though over simplified examples of how the notion of time is completely flexible, malleable and certainly relative to those who decide to observe its rules, or not!

Moreover, what if the illusion of time makes even more sense if we’re living in a simulated universe?

In this episode of Conscious Commentary, we use this idea as a jumping off point to show evidence that time may not be as fixed as we think!

alexisheadshotv2Alexis Brooks is the #1 best-selling author of Conscious Musings, writer/editor for CLN and host of the award-winning show Higher Journeys with Alexis Brooks. Alexis brings over 30 years of broadcast media experience to CLN. For over half of that time, Alexis has dedicated her work to the medium of alternative journalism, having researched and reported on the many aspects and angles of metaphysics, spirituality and new thought concepts.

This article and its accompanying media was originally created and produced by Higher Journeys in association Conscious Life News and is published here under a Creative Commons license with attribution to Alexis Brooks, HigherJourneys.com and ConsciousLifeNews.com. It may be re-posted freely with proper attribution, author bio, and this Copyright/Creative Commons statement.




Incredible, Surprising Photos of Tribe Living in Jungle in Total Isolation

By Alexa Erickson | Collective Evolution

It’s so easy to get caught up in what we that we often forget there are so many different types of realities happening throughout the world, some of which we could have never fathomed to be true.

While many of us buzz around in our cars, on our phones, in and out of offices, and relax at restaurants, in our homes in cul-de-sacs or nestled among a big city, hitting the gym, trendy outfits, or enjoying our eco-friendly flair, there are parts of the world where such modern life is completely non-existent — to the point where it feels more surreal, more like a movie set than anything else.

But every now and then, we are reminded that life exists outside of our bubble. Aerial photographs of an isolated tribe in the Brazilian rainforest are one of the most recent examples, as they expose a look at a Neolithic way of life that has all but vanished from Earth’s existence.

Brazilian photographer Ricardo Stuckert took high-resolution images, which show a colorful yet discreet indigenous community living in total isolation within the Amazon jungle.

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“I felt like I was a painter in the last century,” Stuckert said to National Geographic of his reaction to spotting the natives. “To think that in the 21st century, there are still people who have no contact with civilization, living as their ancestors did 20,000 years ago—it’s a powerful emotion.”

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The photos, which were taken near Brazil’s border with Peru, are revolutionary in the sense that, because they are so close-up, they reveal specific information about the Indians that had largely gone unnoticed by experts before, like the emphasis on body paint and their haircuts.

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“We thought they all cut their hair in the same way,” noted José Carlos Meirelles, an expert on Brazil’s indigenous tribes. “Not true. You can see they have many different styles. Some look very punk.”

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The tribe became the subject of global conversation back in 2008, when agents from Brazil’s indigenous affairs agency, Fundação Nacional do Índio (FUNAI) published images of the tribesmen covered in red body paint shooting arrows at their hovering airplane. Since then, the tribe has reportedly moved several times. According to Meirelles, they move locations every four years.

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READ THE REST OF THIS ARTICLE…




Healing the Healer: When Plants and Animals Speak

Almost everybody talks to their pets, but it takes a special person to hear what their pets say in return.

Animal Communicator Maiccu Kostiainen

Maiccu Kostiainen lives in Finland and is an animal communicator and medium. That means  that she intuitively communicates with animals, living and past, by understanding their thoughts, emotions, and energy. Maiccu’s unique gifts allow her to reach beyond the veil of human awareness, into the realm of animal consciousness. It’s a dimension of presence, love, and acceptance, one that, according to Maiccu, animals enjoy on a nearly-constant constant basis.

As an animal communicator, Maiccu helps bridge the gap of understanding between animals and humans and help people to understand the needs of their pets as well as hear the messages that the animals have to say.

Maiccu is also a best-selling author and lecturer who teaches 

along with her partner and fellow healer, Ingela Nicklas. Ingela is a Reiki Grand Master, someone who channels energy into clients to activate the body’s natural healing abilities. Together, Maiccu and Ingela use energy healing and animal communication to heal animals and the people related to them.

In an interview with me, Maiccu describes how she discovered her own intuitive gifts, the life-changing events that her gifts have opened up for her, and how discovering sacred plant medicine helped her to hone her talents as a healer and heal the healer within her.

Animal Communicator

Throughout most of her adult life, Maiccu was very satisfied in her high-paying career as an airplane mechanic for Finnish National Airline. But a peculiar and undenliable experience changed her life’s focus from mechanical to spiritual.

In the year 2000, Maiccu’s dog passed, incidentally on his 5th birthday, and almost simultaneously she began to unexplainably sense his thoughts and feelings. This had never happened before, and the phenomenon both touched and surprised her and she began to read voraciously about animal communication and mediumship. Maiccu soon realized that she had a gift for animal communication and the more she learned and practiced, the more her talents grew.

Eventually, Maiccu began receiving messages from her beloved and long-since deceased horse, Leyla. Over time, the messages from Leyla became more and more clear and one day Leyla informed Maiccu, “We are going to write a book together.” Leyla’s message surprised Maiccu but was soon confirmed by at least three other mediums, none of whom had prior knowledge of Maiccu’s conversation with Leyla. And so, despite it’s unorthodoxy, Maiccu began to co-write a book with the spirit of her deceased horse.

Maiccu and Leyla Write a Book

Maiccu and her horse Leyla

Maiccu said that Leyla’s words found a voice through her fingers as she typed their book. Titled, The Power of Silent Wisdom, the book is Leyla’s advice to humans about love, sorrow, fear, and giving up control to a higher purpose. In the book, Leyla also explains that animals are in a constant state of presence, usually in a state of oneness, and that this state is programmed into in their DNA.

Leyla’s most important message to humans is to simply do less and learn to just be. Leyla pointed out that often, when humans experience difficult emotions or encounter something they don’t understand, they create a name or disorder for it and try to remedy it with a pill. Leyla, counseled humans to stop feeling as if something is wrong all the time.

The Power of Silent Wisdom was published in 2011 and became the highest selling spiritual book in Finland in 2012. With the success of her book, it became clear to Maiccu that her calling in life was to share her gifts as an intuitive animal communicator so quit her great paying job as an airplane mechanic to devote herself full-time to this calling of animal communication.

 

Maiccu Kostiainen, Ingela Nicklas, and Gerry Powell (Founder of Rythmia)

Discovering Sacred Plant Medicine

As the result of her unique gifts, Maiccu has had many rare opportunities, not only to travel to teach and heal, but also to discover other pathways of healing and new modes to connect with animals. One of these discoveries was the world of sacred plant medicine. Little did she know how important sacred plants would be to refine her talents as a healer and animal communicator.

In 2017, Maiccu and Ingela discovered a documentary called The Reality of Truth, a documentary that explores the healing power of sacred plant medicine. As healers themselves, Maiccu and Ingela were fascinated by this ancient mode of healing because it seemed to provide a glimpse into a different realm, similar to the one they knew through Reiki and animal communication. Maiccu and Ingela began to research Rythmia, a life-advancement center in Costa Rica which was featured in the film, and which offers sacred plant medicine ceremonies with shamans, as well as nutrition, massage, colonic hydrotherapy, and lectures for personal transformation.

Intrigued by the testimonies about the healing power of sacred plant medicine, Maiccu used her talents as a medium to ask some of the wisest people she knew, her deceased mother and horse, whether or not going to Rhythmia to explore sacred plant medicine would be a good idea. The flurry of events that soon transpired over the next several months felt like a direct response to her inquiry, and soon Maiccu and Ingela found that not only were they bound for Rythmia, but they were even invited to attend as a presenters to teach about their gifts of healing and animal communication.

 

Plant Medicine Opens Maiccu’s Eyes as an Animal Communicator

To date, Maiccu has attended 9 plant medicine ceremonies, each healing and profound. One of her most profound experiences during one particular ceremony helped to hone her skill as an intuitive, medium, and animal communicator. Maiccu said that after taking the sacred plant medicine, she felt herself turn into several different animals and experienced first-hand their state of mind and their feeling of oneness with all things. She said that she felt herself morph into a panther, whale, dolphin, snake, mouse, and even a cockroach, and was able to experience for herself what it was like to be, think, and feel the way animals do. As an animal communicator, she said that this experience was the best gift that the Universe could have ever given her.

Maiccu was given another rare opportunity to view the world through the through the eyes of an animal when Rythmia’s mascot, the owner’s gentle dog named Kayla, moved through the ceremony and acted as a guide to Maiccu by showing her the world from a dog’s point of view. From Kayla’s perspective, Maiccu saw how everything in the world is connected. Kayla told Maiccu that as a dog, she always sees the world with such connectedness, a state that humans are struggling to arrive at. Maiccu said that as she morphed into a dog, she could smell the world and see its colors, just like a dog does. This rare experience directly influenced her ability to sense into animals’ thoughts, needs, and desires.

One of the ways Maiccu says that ceremonial plant medicine helps people become hyper-present like animals is that it helps them to learn to give up control and put themselves into the hands of a sacred and healing spirit. She says that often, the ego which is anathema to this healing spirit, tries to stay in control. The struggle between the ego and the healing spirit causes dissonance. Further, she proffers that the healing qualities from the medicine only come when people yield and allow themselves to be healed by it, even if that means traveling through a momentary darkness in order to heal those wounded parts to arrive at the places lasting of inner-light.

Learning to yield to the plant medicine ultimately gave Maiccu the gift of communing with and morphing into animals, and has massively improved her already honed sensitivity as an intuitive, healer, and animal communicator. Much to her surprise, plant medicine has also improved her mediumship with humans. As someone who always heals others, Maiccu was awestruck that thanks to these medicinal gifts, she would be the one healed

 

The Healer Receives Healing through Plant Medicine

In addition to giving her a profound connection with animals, Maiccu says that the sacred plant medicine also healed her of some chronic problems, including a life-long scourge of crippling anxiety and an addiction to beer.

Before using sacred plant medicine, Maiccu used beer to cope with her anxiety and stress. Drinking beer was also her most common way to unwind at the end of a long day. And, like many people in Finland, Maiccu loves to sauna and beer is often a part of that cultural ritual. For all these reasons, Maiccu had developed a strong dependance on beer. Yet, there’s a saying in Finland that says, “Problems swim in alcohol,” and Maiccu certainly understood how her addiction to beer contributed to her anxiety. Plus, Maiccu felt that her regular use of beer was dulling her senses as an animal communicator.

A common phrase at Rythmia is, “You must purge before you merge with the Divine.” And certainly Maiccu needed to purge old ways of relating to the world that were causing static in her transmissions as an animal communicator.

Maiccu wasn’t sure what to expect as she went into her very first ceremony at Rythmia and she was hoping that her nervousness about the unknown wouldn’t escalate into a panic attack. Yet, to her dismay the first three hours of her journey with sacred plant medicine sent her reeling into a severe panic attack, causing her to sweat profusely, racking her with worry, and leaving her solar plexus aching for days.

But after 3 hours of one of the most severe panic attacks she’s ever experienced, Maiccu said that something magical happened. She said that the plant medicine taught her to open up, taught her to breathe again, and ultimately taught her to let go of control and yield something higher. At the very moment she handed her will over to the medicine, her anxiety vanished and she was left with a profound and enduring peace. Since that moment, her lifetime of anxiety has been practically eradicated. She couldn’t believe how the plant medicine had purged her of anxiety in the moment and how it seemed to be healed for good. With her panic attacks gone, Maiccu she says that she can now focus much better and is more effective as an animal communicator. She feels as though the medicine purposefully led her through this severe panic attack so she could heal from it permanently.

Unlike medicating with beer, plant medicine isn’t addictive and seems to have a very different effect on problems. In fact, Bill Wilson, the founder of Alcoholics Anonymous, became sober and started his world-famous organization after having a spiritual experience as the result of plant medicine. Maiccu says that sacred plant medicine is different than other drugs because it tends facilitate healing by offering astounding clarity and understanding of their divine worth rather than dulling the mind or distracting them from their problems.

Since experiencing plant medicine ceremonies, Maiccu says that she no longer feels the imperative to drink. She says that whatever she was trying to medicate with alcohol seems to have been made whole. Now, she only occasionally drinks socially, perhaps one or two times a month and never to excess. Maiccu says that she now enjoys greater clarity and and connection in her work because she’s no longer remedying her anxiety with alcohol. She says she’s more receptive to the animal world with this added clarity.

Discovery

Maiccu Kostiainen has led an unpredictable and fascinating life as she has discovered and followed her gifts as an animal communicator, intuitive, and medium. Her gifts have led her to meet new people, connect to the spirits of animals, and have given her the chance to offer an important spiritual message to the world. Her intuition and gifts also led her to explore sacred plant medicine which healed the healer in her enabled her to offer her gifts with greater clarity and focus.

Maiccu’s enduring message to the world is to spend time with animals and allow them to teach you to be present. She also says that for anyone who is interested in using sacred plant medicine, to spend the time to prepare for it with clean eating, meditation, and of course spending time with animals.

To date, Maiccu and Ingela have now been to Rythmia twice to present and participate in ceremony and will return in March of 2019. You can visit Maiccu’s website here.

 

Scott Moore is a senior teacher of yoga and mindfulness and lives in Southern France. When he’s not teaching or conducting retreats, he writes for Conscious Life News, Elephant Journal, Mantra Magazine, Medium, and his own blog at scottmooreyoga.com. Scott also loves to run, play the saxophone, and travel with his wife and son. Check out his yoga retreats to places like Hawaii and Amalfi Coast , his online Yoga Nidra Course and his Yoga Teacher Mentor Program




How to Manifest by Knowing the Holographic Nature of Reality

Researcher Billy Carson says you can manifest more if you understand how reality works

Everyone wants to know how to better manifest. And although there are many books, courses, and workshops that explain just how to do it, there is one essential ingredient that we are missing, says 4biddenknowledge founder and researcher Billy Carson.

By discovering how integral fractals are to our universe, Carson married this idea with another: The Holographic Universe, made popular by the late Michael Talbot and came up with some astounding findings that boil down to one thing…

We are walking, talking, living manifesting machines!

The equations, he says don’t lie!

You’ve GOT to hear what Carson has to say as it relates to why billions of people though faithful in their prayer and meditation practices, neglect to manifest what they are asking for or desire.

This is part of our special Conscious Life Expo pre-expo speaker series. Be sure to visit Conscious Life Expo to learn more and to attend this special 4-day event!

And if you can’t attend – No Worries! Take advantage of the amazing offer below…

Stay tuned for more great interviews from Expo speakers, only on Higher Journeys with Alexis Brooks!

If you haven’t already, be sure to subscribe to Higher Journeys on YouTube!

alexisheadshotv2Alexis Brooks is the #1 best-selling author of Conscious Musings, writer/editor for CLN and host of the award-winning show Higher Journeys with Alexis Brooks. Alexis brings over 30 years of broadcast media experience to CLN. For over half of that time, Alexis has dedicated her work to the medium of alternative journalism, having researched and reported on the many aspects and angles of metaphysics, spirituality and new thought concepts.

This article and its accompanying media was originally created and produced by Higher Journeys in association Conscious Life News and is published here under a Creative Commons license with attribution to Alexis Brooks, HigherJourneys.com and ConsciousLifeNews.com. It may be re-posted freely with proper attribution, author bio, and this Copyright/Creative Commons statement.