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Stroke Victims to Be Given Psychedelic Drug DMT in First-Ever US Clinical Trials

By | TheMindUnleashed.com

The hallucinogenic drug DMT (dimethyltryptamine) could provide crucial aid to stroke victims by minimizing the damage inflicted on victims’ brains as they are rushed to the hospital, according to researchers.

Canadian company Algernon Pharmaceuticals has laid out plans to microdose participants in the first clinical trial of its kind in hopes to help stroke victims’ brains recover faster through a “rewiring” process, reports Metro.

A stroke occurs when blood supplies to a part of the brain are drastically reduced or interrupted, starving the vital organ of fresh oxygen and nutrients and setting in motion the death of crucial nerve cells. In some cases, stroke can even lead to death. About 795,000 people suffer from strokes annually in the U.S.

However, researchers at Algernon argue that DMT could play a key role in staving off the worst effects of stroke by sparking the growth of new neurons, effectively turbo-charging the healing process.

In the first-ever clinical trials of this kind in the U.S., DMT will soon be administered to stroke patients in the back of ambulances. While the doses will be far too small to trigger any sort of hallucinations, scientists are claiming that the microdoses will still be sufficient for conferring benefits.

The Phase 1 trials could begin as soon as next month if they receive a green light from authorities. It could still take years before the drug receives approval for human use.

Algernon CEO Christopher Moreau is hopeful that the drug will prove its ability to help heal the brains of those who suffer from a stroke.

“Since we’re dealing with stroke patients, we will be using the sub-hallucinogenic dose, which in pre-clinical studies has still shown to improve neuroplasticity,” Moreau explained.

It will help the brain heal even though patients aren’t having the psychedelic experience, and we really don’t want that if your patient has just had a stroke,” he continued. “The sooner you can start to treat post-injury the better.”

However, the drug could likely have its limits.

“DMT may not benefit hemorrhagic (stroke victims), we don’t know, but we’re hoping it won’t cause them any problems because then we don’t have to wait for the CT scan, we can treat in the ambulance,” Moreau added.

DMT – also known as the “spirit molecule” for its extremely potent hallucinogenic properties – is one of the main psychoactive compounds found in ayahuasca, a brew consumed in shamanistic rituals that have been used for centuries in South America before finding its way into North America and Europe as a recreational drug popular at music festivals.

Experts and users of DMT have said that the drug has a similar impact to other psychedelic drugs as LSD and psilocybin or “magic” mushrooms. However, the psychedelic experience or so-called “trip” from DMT is much shorter in duration than either of the other psychedelic drugs.

Studies of DMT have shown that it does have the ability to improve motor functions, and in tests, on brain-damaged rats, it helped trigger the formation of new brain cells.

Moreau claims that studies have shown that within hours of a stroke, the brain attempts to rewire itself – and that DMT may potentially accelerate the process.

At present, patients have little recourse in the immediate aftermath of a stroke because doctors seldom know what type of stroke someone may be suffering from. While ischemic strokes involving blood clots require blood thinner as treatment, hemorrhagic strokes require more invasive treatment.

However, the wrong type of treatment for a stroke could be fatal for patients.

Algernon hopes that if the first phase of trials proves successful, regulators will approve the more widespread usage of the treatment. In the second and third phases of the trial, Algernon hopes to continue DMT treatments over the short and long term to prove the efficacy of the treatment.




Do Entities From Another Universe Inhabit the Brains of Psychedelic DMT Users?

flower of life

By Phillip Smith | AlterNet.org

Have you encountered stick men, machine elves or other discarnate entities while tripping brains on DMT? If so, you’re not alone. The use of the powerful, fast-acting psychedelic dimethyltryptamine (DMT) generates reports of such entities on a regular basis.

DMT has been around for a long time, although it’s never been that popular—and encounters with extradimensional critters may be part of the reason why. Back in the 1970s, it was known as “the businessman’s trip” because you could take it at the beginning of the lunch hour and be back to normal it was time to go back to work. When smoked, the psychedelic effects begin almost immediately and fade away with half an hour.

It’s also the active psychoactive ingredient in ayahuasca, the mind-melting tea concocted by Amazonian shamans and venerated by the Uniao Do Vegetal  (the Union of the Vegetable), a Brazilian church with some 15,000 adherents.

In an article in Psychology Today, Scott McGreal zeroed in on DMT’s remarkable ability to allow its users to “encounter non-human intelligence, often resembling aliens.” What’s more, McGreal notes, citing the work of pioneering DMT researcher psychiatrist Rick Strassman, “some users come away from these encounters convinced that these entities are somehow real.”

Strassman, who detailed his 1990s research findings in DMT: The Spirit Molecule, explained that under high doses of DMT, experienced volunteer subjects experienced rapid and overwhelming psychedelic effects, losing awareness of their surroundings and their bodies as the effects peaked at around two minutes. After the initial rush, the subjects were able to describe their continuing experience and generally reported visual imagery that could be seen with eyes open or closed; brighter, more intense, and more deeply-saturated colors, and kaleidoscopic geometric patterns.

According to Strassman, “about half” the subjects went even further, entering into what he called “freestanding, independent levels of existence” of a most unusual nature. There, they said they encountered intelligent “beings,” “entities,” “aliens,” or “guides.” They described them as “clowns, reptiles, mantises, bees, spiders, cacti, and stick figures.”

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