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How to Survive Without Running Water

By Gaye Levy | www.survivallife.com 

 123rf.com-NoRunningWater33549830_m-692x692

Getting caught without running water — due to a freeze, busted pipe or some other unforeseen emergency — is no laughing matter. It can be devastating and, if it lasts long enough, deadly.

Gaye Levy from Backdoor Survival has some tips on how to cope when you don’t have running water.

Every prepper worth their salt stores water and lots of it.  Not only that, they store one, two, three or more ways to purify water.  That is all well and good because you never know when a disaster or other disruptive event may occur and those water resources will be called upon for drinking, cleaning, hygiene, and sanitation purposes.

Recently, my number came up and I was the one without water during a short term, personal water apocalypse.  Now really, that may be a bit dramatic because I was simply without running water.  This was caused by a break in the line from the water main at the street to my home.  All told, I was without running water for 12 days.

To be honest, I was quite relaxed about the ordeal.  After all, I had cases of bottled water for drinking, a 55 gallon water barrel holding purified water, a source of raw, unfiltered water from a gravity pump right outside my house, and of course, my Berkey, LifeStraw Family, SolarBag, and pool shock for water purification.

Still, being without running water brought up issues I had not considered.  Albeit water-ready, the reality of not being able to turn on the tap and have fresh, and especially hot, water was a new experience.

Today I share tips for coping without running water so that you can be better prepared if something similar happens to you.

16 Tips for Coping Without Running Water

  1. With advance notice of a water shutoff, fill the bathtub and as many spare jugs and buckets as you can round up. In addition, fill the Berkey, if you have one and all of your sinks.
  2. Double up on hand sanitation.  Fill a spray bottle with liquid castile soap, water, and a copious amount of tea tree or other anti-bacterial essential oil. To wash you hands, spray with a generous amount of your soap/tea tree mixture then rinse with water from a filled sink or a container of water set next to the sink.  Follow-up with commercial hand sanitizer.  See DIY Liquid Castile Soap.
  3. Know the location of your preps!  In my case, I had two camp showers that could have been used for taking hot showers after heating water on the stove.  Could I find them?  Nope.
  4. No mater how many buckets you have, you need more.  In addition, make sure the buckets you have are manageable, weight wise, when filled with water.  Remember, water weighs 8.35 pounds per gallon.  My buckets were re-purposed 2-pound buckets obtained for free from a local café and were small enough for me to handle comfortably when filled.  A water filled 5 gallon bucket would have been a problem.
  5. When using the toilet, flush liquids daily but solids upon each use.  I had two toilets in use so it was easy to abide by this formula.  I did not, however, flush TP (see below).
  6. Dispose of toilet paper into a wastebasket and not into the toilet.  This will prevent your toilet from backing up because it is crammed with paper!  Been there, done that.  Do, however, be mindful of the smell and dispose of the contents of your wastebasket daily.  Baking soda helps control odors if you can not dispose of soiled TP often enough.
  7. When it comes time to flush, fill the tank with water and use the handle on the toilet to flush.  This uses less water than dumping water into the bowl.
  8. Stock up on disposable plates, cups, and eating utensils.  Cleaning up after meals will be a challenge and will use a lot of water.  Save the water you have for cooking utensils and use disposables for everything else.

[Read more here]

Robert O'Leary, JD BARA

Robert O’Leary, JD BARA, has had an abiding interest in alternative health products and modalities since the early 1970’s, and he has seen how they have made people go from lacking health to vibrant health. He became an attorney, singer-songwriter, martial artist and father along the way and brings that experience to his practice as a BioAcoustic Soundhealth Practitioner, under the tutelage of the award-winning founder of BioAcoustic Biology, Sharry Edwards, whose Institute of BioAcoustic Biology has now been serving clients for 30 years with a non-invasive and safe integrative modality that supports the body’s ability to self-heal using the power of the human voice. Robert brings this modality to serve clients in Greater Springfield (MA), New England and “virtually” the world, through his new website, www.romayasoundhealthandbeauty.com. He may also be contacted at romayasoundhealthandbeauty@gmail.com

 




Pew, Pew, Pew! NASA Space Lasers to Map Earth’s Forests in 3D

Credit: NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center

An artist’s conception of the 3D maps of forest architecture that data from GEDI could produce.  Credit: NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center

Kelly Dickerson | Space.com Staff Writer

A new laser instrument developed for the International Space Station is expected to generate incredible 3D maps of Earth’s forests.

The instrument called Global Ecosystem Dynamics Investigation (GEDI) uses lidar, a special kind of laser technology, to create detailed 3D maps and measure the biomass of forests. NASA has already launched a satellite designed to measure carbon dioxide in the atmosphere, but the new instrument, once launched, will allow scientists to estimate the total amount of carbon stored here on Earth inside trees.

“GEDI lidar will have a tremendous impact on our ability to monitor forest degradation, adding to the critical data needed to mitigate the effects of climate change,” Patrick O’Shea, chief research officer at the University of Maryland, said in a statement.

Scientists already knew that trees absorb carbon. What scientists don’t know is how much they store. This is a problem because scientists can’t predict how much extra carbon would escape into the atmosphere if a forest was destroyed or if planting new trees would be enough to offset the emissions.

Read the rest of the article.




Space Technology Had Great Achievements, Some Setbacks in 2014

Source:VOAvideo

Space technology this year reached some important goals, culminating with the spectacular landing of a space probe on a comet, millions of kilometers from Earth. But there were some setbacks, too. This video shows some of the highlights and lowlights.




209 Seconds That Will Make You Question Your Entire Existence

Source:BuzzFeedBlue

Every time you get upset about something small, just remember this.  Consider how small Earth is relative to vastness of the universe. This video provides a glimpse




EMF Radiation Your Right to Know

There’s a Dark Side of Technology Cloaked in Secrecy so You Won’t Understand the Dangers!

It is time to wake up and learn about the dangerous side of the WiFi, cell phones, smart meters, and other gadgets you are surrounded by everyday. Whether at work, at school, or even in the park you are living in an electronic soup.

Dr Olle Johansson has been researching this for many years and because of his research Sweden has recognized a disability brought on by overexposure to electromagnetic radiation called EHS (electromagnetic hypersensitivity). Use this link to scroll down to his bio and discover some of his research: https://bit.ly/OlleJohanssonInterview

Olle Johansson is one of the experts interviewed on the EMF summit

EMF summit banner

I recently learned the Chemtrails that are blanketing our skies with a blue haze and streaks of persistent chemicals from planes have a primary objective to increase the power of WiFi communication by blanketing the atmosphere with toxic chemicals and nanoparticles of heavy metals like aluminium, barium, etc.

Chemtrails over Spain-compressed

This fascinating Italian documentary with English subtitles will keep you riveted and help you connect the dots on this global agenda of Wifi proliferation that is harming your health and the planet: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=U-5VnMIiKPY

Alison Heath Longevity RescuerAlison Heath the Longevity Rescuer has been assisting people to reclaim their vitality and optimal health for over 25 years. She’s hosts the popular summits Your Vibrant Health Secrets and the EMF summit. You’ll find her personal blog site athttps://LongevityRescuer.com She’s published a regular column calledThe Natural Path in MD News Magazine to inform physicians about the latest research in integrative health solutions. She’s published numerous client success stories in Vitality, Toronto’s largest health magazine. Alison has written a chapter in Nomi Shannon, the Raw Gourmet’s up coming book on raw food. Alison is an integrative health coach, speaker, author, and interviewer.




Everything You Need To Know To Catch Saturday’s Geminid Meteor Shower

geminid dec 13 2014

By Robbie Gonzalez | io9.com

The Geminid meteor shower is one of the most consistently impressive celestial light shows of the year. And this year’s display hits its peak this weekend. Here’s what you need to know to spot as many meteors as possible.

Pictured above: A massive Geminid fireball from 2009’s shower, one of the brightest ever recorded. The Geminids are notorious for lasting several days and being rich in uncommonly bright “earthgrazer” meteors via NASA

Avoid Light Like the Plague

We’re talking all kinds of light. City lights, street lights, house lights, flashlights, any lights. This year, a waning moon will already be giving off some light during peak viewing hours, so don’t make things any worse by blasting your retinas with the light from your phone. It is a well-known fact that backlit cellphone screens were put on this Earth to ruin meteor showers.

If you’re in the country, go find a big open field. If you’re in the city, get out if you can. If you can’t get out, try to find a high point. These measures can make a HUGE difference.

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Fun Video ~ Watch NASA Spoof ‘All About That Bass’ With ‘All About That Space’

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kHy08ZPav88

Source: ReelNASA

NASA just released this fun and nerdy spoof of Meghan Trainor‘s hit single All About That Bass, appropriately titled All About That Space.
“All About That Space” is a volunteer outreach video project created by the Pathways Interns of NASA’s Johnson Space Center. It was created as a parody (to raise interest and excitement for Orion’s first flight) of Meghan Trainor’s “All About That Bass”. The lyrics and scenes in the video have been re-imagined in order to inform the public about the amazing work going on at NASA and the Johnson Space Center.

NASA’s Orion spacecraft is built to take humans farther than they’ve ever gone before. Orion will serve as the exploration vehicle that will carry the crew to space, provide emergency abort capability, sustain the crew during the space travel, and provide safe re-entry from deep space return velocities.




Cosmic Glow Discovered –“Radiates More Light than All the Known Galaxies in the Universe”

Dailygalaxy

Image Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech

Image Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech

Using an experiment carried into space on a NASA suborbital rocket, astronomers at Caltech and their colleagues have detected a diffuse cosmic glow that appears to represent more light than that produced by known galaxies in the universe. Initially some researchers proposed that this light came from the very first galaxies to form and ignite stars after the Big Bang. CalTechresearchers say that the best explanation is that the cosmic light originates from stars that were stripped away from their parent galaxies and flung out into space as those galaxies collided and merged with other galaxies.

The discovery suggests that many such previously undetected stars permeate what had been thought to be dark spaces between galaxies, forming an interconnected sea of stars. “Measuring such large fluctuations surprised us, but we carried out many tests to show the results are reliable,” says CalTech Fellow Michael Zemcov, who led the study.Although they cannot be seen individually, “the total light produced by these stray stars is about equal to the background light we get from counting up individual galaxies,” says Bock, also a senior research scientist at JPL. Bock is the principal investigator of the rocket project, called theCosmic Infrared Background Experiment, or CIBER, which originated at Caltech and flew on four rocket flights from 2009 through 2013.

In earlier studies, NASA’s Spitzer Space Telescope, which sees the universe at longer wavelengths, had observed a splotchy pattern of infrared light called the cosmic infrared background. The splotches are much bigger than individual galaxies. “We are measuring structures that are grand on a cosmic scale,” says Zemcov, “and these sizes are associated with galaxies bunching together on a large-scale pattern.”

CIBER was designed to help settle the debate. “CIBER was born as a conversation with Asantha Cooray, a theoretical cosmologist at UC Irvine and at the time a postdoc at Caltech with [former professor] Marc Kamionkowski,” Bock explains. “Asantha developed an idea for studying galaxies by measuring their large-scale structure. Galaxies form in dark-matter halos, which are over-dense regions initially seeded in the early universe by inflation. Furthermore, galaxies not only start out in these halos, they tend to cluster together as well. Asantha had the brilliant idea to measure this large-scale structure directly from maps. Experimentally, it is much easier for us to make a map by taking a wide-field picture with a small camera, than going through and measuring faint galaxies one by one with a large telescope.”

Cooray originally developed this approach for the longer infrared wavelengths observed by the European Space Agency’s Herschel Space Observatory. “With its 3.5-meter diameter mirror, Herschel is too small to count up all the galaxies that make the infrared background light, so he instead obtained this information from the spatial structure in the map,” Bock says.

“Meanwhile, I had been working on near-infrared rocket experiments, and was interested in new ways to use this unique idea to study the extragalactic background,” he says. The extragalactic infrared background represents all of the infrared light from all of the sources in the universe, “and there were some hints we didn’t know where it was all coming from.”

In other words, if you calculate the light produced by individual galaxies, you would find they made less than the background light. “One could try and measure the total sky brightness directly,” Bock says, “but the problem is that the foreground ‘Zodiacal light,’ due to dust in the solar system reflecting light from the sun, is so bright that it is hard to subtract with enough accuracy to measure the extragalactic background. So we put these two ideas together, applying Asantha’s mapping approach to new wavelengths, and decided that the best way to get at the extragalactic background was to measure spatial fluctuations on angular scales around a degree. That led to CIBER.”

The CIBER experiment consists of three instruments, including two spectrometers to determine the brightness of Zodiacal light and measure the cosmic infrared background directly. The measurements in the recent publication are made with two wide-field cameras to search for fluctuations in two wavelengths of near infrared light. Earth’s upper atmosphere glows brightly at the CIBER wavelengths. But the measurements can be done in space—avoiding that glow—in just the short amount of time that a suborbital rocket flies above the atmosphere, before descending again back toward the planet.

CIBER flew four missions in all; the paper includes results from the second and third of CIBER’s flights, launched in 2010 and 2012 from White Sands Missile Range in New Mexico and recovered afterward by parachute. In the flights, the researchers observed the same part of the sky at a different time of year, and swapped the detector arrays as a crosscheck against data artifacts created by the sensors. “This series of flights was quite helpful in developing complete confidence in the results,” says Zemcov. “For the final flight, we decided to get more time above the atmosphere and went with a non-recovered flight into the Atlantic Ocean on a four-stage rocket.” (The data from the fourth flight will be discussed in a future paper.)

Based on data from these two launches, the researchers found fluctuations, but they had to go through a careful process to identify and remove local sources, such as the instrument, as well as emissions from the solar system, stars, scattered starlight in the Milky Way, and known galaxies. What is left behind is a splotchy pattern representing fluctuations in the remaining infrared background light.

[read full post here]




Star Trek-Like Invisible Shield Found Thousands Of Miles Above Earth

Colorado

Scientists have discovered an invisible shield roughly 7,200 miles above Earth that blocks so-called “killer electrons,” which can fry satellites and degrade space systems during intense solar storms. Illustration by Andy Kale, University of Alberta.

Scientists have discovered an invisible shield roughly 7,200 miles above Earth that blocks so-called “killer electrons,” which can fry satellites and degrade space systems during intense solar storms. Illustration by Andy Kale, University of Alberta.

A team led by the University of Colorado Boulder has discovered an invisible shield some 7,200 miles above Earth that blocks so-called “killer electrons,” which whip around the planet at near-light speed and have been known to threaten astronauts, fry satellites and degrade space systems during intense solar storms.

The barrier to the particle motion was discovered in the Van Allen radiation belts, two doughnut-shaped rings above Earth that are filled with high-energy electrons and protons, said Distinguished Professor Daniel Baker, director of CU-Boulder’s Laboratory for Atmospheric and Space Physics (LASP). Held in place by Earth’s magnetic field, the Van Allen radiation belts periodically swell and shrink in response to incoming energy disturbances from the sun.

As the first significant discovery of the space age, the Van Allen radiation belts were detected in 1958 by Professor James Van Allen and his team at the University of Iowa and were found to be comprised of an inner and outer belt extending up to 25,000 miles above Earth’s surface. In 2013, Baker — who received his doctorate under Van Allen — led a team that used the twin Van Allen Probes launched by NASA in 2012 to discover a third, transient “storage ring” between the inner and outer Van Allen radiation belts that seems to come and go with the intensity of space weather.

The latest mystery revolves around an “extremely sharp” boundary at the inner edge of the outer belt at roughly 7,200 miles in altitude that appears to block the ultrafast electrons from breeching the shield and moving deeper towards Earth’s atmosphere.

“It’s almost like theses electrons are running into a glass wall in space,” said Baker, the study’s lead author. “Somewhat like the shields created by force fields on Star Trek that were used to repel alien weapons, we are seeing an invisible shield blocking these electrons. It’s an extremely puzzling phenomenon.”

A paper on the subject was published in the Nov. 27 issue of Nature.

The team originally thought the highly charged electrons, which are looping around Earth at more than 100,000 miles per second, would slowly drift downward into the upper atmosphere and gradually be wiped out by interactions with air molecules. But the impenetrable barrier seen by the twin Van Allen belt spacecraft stops the electrons before they get that far, said Baker.

The group looked at a number of scenarios that could create and maintain such a barrier. The team wondered if it might have to do with Earth’s magnetic field lines, which trap and control protons and electrons, bouncing them between Earth’s poles like beads on a string. The also looked at whether radio signals from human transmitters on Earth could be scattering the charged electrons at the barrier, preventing their downward motion. Neither explanation held scientific water, Baker said.

“Nature abhors strong gradients and generally finds ways to smooth them out, so we would expect some of the relativistic electrons to move inward and some outward,” said Baker. “It’s not obvious how the slow, gradual processes that should be involved in motion of these particles can conspire to create such a sharp, persistent boundary at this location in space.”

Another scenario is that the giant cloud of cold, electrically charged gas called the plasmasphere, which begins about 600 miles above Earth and stretches thousands of miles into the outer Van Allen belt, is scattering the electrons at the boundary with low frequency, electromagnetic waves that create a plasmapheric “hiss,” said Baker. The hiss sounds like white noise when played over a speaker, he said.

While Baker said plasmaspheric hiss may play a role in the puzzling space barrier, he believes there is more to the story. “I think the key here is to keep observing the region in exquisite detail, which we can do because of the powerful instruments on the Van Allen probes. If the sun really blasts the Earth’s magnetosphere with a coronal mass ejection (CME), I suspect it will breach the shield for a period of time,” said Baker, also a faculty member in the astrophysical and planetary sciences department

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VLT Telescope Reveals Mysterious Alignment of Quasars with the Universe’s Large-Scale Structure

 | Gizmag.com

Astronomers using the ESO’s Very Large Telescope (VLT) in Chile have discovered an unexpected alignment of the spinning axes of supermassive black holes located billions of light-years apart. As if that discovery wasn’t fascinating enough in itself, the team then delved a little deeper, finding that the quasars aren’t just linked to each other, but are also aligned with the large-scale structure of the Universe itself.

An artist's impression of the alignment of quasars with the large-scale structure of the Universe (Image: ESO/M. Kornmesser)

An artist’s impression of the alignment of quasars with the large-scale structure of the Universe (Image: ESO/M. Kornmesser)

The VLT’s observations focused on quasars – galaxies with active supermassive black holes at their heart, surrounded by spinning disks of bright, high temperature material. This extremely hot material is thrown out in jets along the axes of rotation.

To make the discovery, the team observed a sample of 93 quasars, all of which reside in such distant locations that the observed light comes from a time when the Universe was around a third of its current age. The team was unable to study the quasars directly, but instead measured the polarisation of the light from each object, using that data to identify the angle of its spin.

The astronomers first discovered that the axes of rotation, as seen in the direction of the high-speed jets, were aligned with each other. Considering the billions of light-years that separate the objects, that alone is a striking discovery, but further observations revealed an even greater level of alignment.

When you look at the Universe on a wide enough scale, you find that the distribution of galaxies is not even, but instead forms a web of clumps and filaments surrounding gigantic near-empty voids. According to the VLT findings, not only are the rotational axes of quasars aligned with each other, but they also tend to be arranged in parallel with this cosmic distribution of material, known as the large-scale structure…

Keep reading full post




Elements Of Life In Space? Rosetta Probe Discovers Organic Molecules On Comet

Inquisitr

RosettaAs if the Rosetta comet probe mission wasn’t cool enough already, the team behind the Rosetta mission says that they’ve discovered organic compounds in the comet’s atmosphere. The discovery could give scientists new insight into the origins of life on Earth.

A report in the Wall Street Journal said that the German agency behind the Rosetta mission was currently analyzing the findings of the Rosetta probe’s analytic data of the comet’s atmosphere. The initial findings, though, indicated that the Philae lander had, in fact, detected organic compounds within the comet’s atmosphere.

Organic compounds are the very building blocks of life on earth. The term encompasses compounds containing the carbon atom and it includes combinations as simple as methane and methanol and as complex as the amino acids that make up proteins. The Rosetta team is currently analyzing the probe’s findings in order to determine the complexity of the organic compounds detected.

In addition to the probe’s atmospheric sampling, the Philae probe also grabbed material samples from the comet’s body using a drill. The data from that experiment has not been fully analyzed.

The team isn’t totally surprised by the findings. It had, in fact, expected that organic molecules would be found on Comet 67P/Churymov-Gerasimenko. The Rosetta mission, though, did provide the first opportunity to search directly for organic materials on and around the comet.

The discovery of something like an amino acid on the surface of a comet would lend credence to notions that life on Earth has extraterrestrial origins. One proposal for the origin of Earth’s life posits that comets collided with Earth, seeding the planet with the materials necessary for life.

[read full post here]




Does Our Universe Bear the Scars of a Collision with Another Universe?

Annalee Newitz | Io9

space universeThough many physicists believe it’s possible that our universe is one of many in a multiverse, they struggle to find concrete evidence to back up that hypothesis. But now, we may find that evidence — if we look for the wreckage left behind by a collision of cosmic proportions.

Illustration by Olena Shmahalo

Over at Quanta, Jennifer Oullette explores one experiment that could provide evidence for the multiverse. It assumes that our universe was born during a collision with another universe — and that this dramatic event may have left a cosmic imprint behind that we can measure.

Writes Oullette:

Like many of her colleagues, Hiranya Peiris, a cosmologist at University College London, once largely dismissed the notion that our universe might be only one of many in a vast multiverse. It was scientifically intriguing, she thought, but also fundamentally untestable. She preferred to focus her research on more concrete questions, like how galaxies evolve.

Then one summer at the Aspen Center for Physics, Peiris found herself chatting with the Perimeter Institute’s Matt Johnson, who mentioned his interest in developing tools to study the idea. He suggested that they collaborate.

At first, Peiris was skeptical. “I think as an observer that any theory, however interesting and elegant, is seriously lacking if it doesn’t have testable consequences,” she said. But Johnson convinced her that there might be a way to test the concept. If the universe that we inhabit had long ago collided with another universe, the crash would have left an imprint on the cosmic microwave background (CMB), the faint afterglow from the Big Bang. And if physicists could detect such a signature, it would provide a window into the multiverse.

[read full post here]




Comet Lander Re-establishes Radio Contact with Earth and Sends Data From Surface

The first image from the surface of a comet! This picture from the Philae lander’s CIVA camera system confirm the probe is safely on the surface of comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko. Credit: ESA/Rosetta/Philae/CIVA

The first image from the surface of a comet! This picture from the Philae lander’s CIVA camera system confirm the probe is safely on the surface of comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko. Credit: ESA/Rosetta/Philae/CIVA

Source: BBC News

The Philae lander on the distant comet 67P re-established radio contact with Earth on Friday night, downlinking yet another stream of science data.

Everything expected from the little probe was delivered, just before low battery power dropped it into standby mode.

The robot is shadowed by a cliff and cannot get enough light on to its solar panels to recharge its systems.

Engineers fear this contact may have been its last – certainly for a while.

Philae descended to the surface of 67P on Wednesday – the first time in history that a space mission has made a soft landing on a comet.

The next opportunity to talk to Philae will come around 1100 GMT on Saturday, when the orbiting Rosetta satellite – which delivered it to the 4km-wide “ice mountain” – comes over the horizon.

Read the rest of the article…

 




Report: Parallel Universes Exist and Interact With Each Other

Video Source: TheLipTV

New quantum theory is out of this parallel world

Griffith University (in Australia) academics are challenging the foundations of quantum science with a radical new theory based on interactions between parallel universes.

In a paper published in the prestigious journal Physical Review X, Professor Howard Wiseman and Dr Michael Hall from Griffith’s Centre for Quantum Dynamics, and Dr Dirk-Andre Deckert from the University of California, take interacting parallel worlds out of the realm of science fiction and into that of hard science.

The team proposes that parallel universes really exist, and that they interact. That is, rather than evolving independently, nearby worlds influence one another by a subtle force of repulsion. They show that such an interaction could explain everything that is bizarre about quantum mechanics.

Read more…




Ron Paul: What The Elections Really Mean For Peace and Liberty


Source: minnesotachris

What The Mid-Term Elections Really Mean For Peace and Liberty

by Ron Paul

Did the election last week really mean that much? I took to my Twitter account on Tuesday to point out that the change in control of the Senate from Democrat to Republican actually means very little, despite efforts by politicians and the mainstream media to convince us otherwise. Yes, power shifted, I wrote. But the philosophy on Capitol Hill changed very little. The warfare/welfare state is still alive and well in Washington.

Some were critical of my comment that, “Republican control of the Senate equals expanded neo-con wars in Syria and Iraq. Boots on the ground are coming!”

But unfortunately my fears were confirmed even sooner than I thought. Shortly after the vote, President Obama announced that he would double the number of US troops on the ground in Iraq and request another $5.6 billion to fight his war in the Middle East.

The President also said on Wednesday that he would seek a new authorization for the use of force in Iraq and Syria. He said that a new authorization was needed to reflect, “not just our strategy over the next two or three months, but our strategy going forward.”

That sounds like boots on the ground in an endless war.

Senate Democrats had been competing with Republicans over who would push a more aggressive foreign policy. This may explain their miserable showing on Tuesday: it is likely the honest, antiwar progressives just stayed home on election night. But with the Republican victory bringing to leadership the most hawkish of the neoconservatives like John McCain, the only fight over the President’s request to re-invade Iraq will be Republican demands that he send in even more soldiers and weapons!

Likewise, the incoming Republicans in the Senate have expressed a foolhardy desire to continue resurrecting the Cold War. They demand that Russia be further sanctioned even as the original reason for the sanctions – claims that Russia was behind the downing of Malaysian Airlines flight MH-17 – has been shown to be false. They want to send weapons to the US-backed government in Ukraine even through it will result in more civilians killed in east Ukraine. Their dangerous Russia policy may even turn the new Cold War into a hot war, which would be catastrophic.

On the domestic front, I do not hold out much hope that the next Congress will give more than lip service to reducing spending. What is more likely is Republicans will support dramatic increases in welfare spending as long warfare spending is increased by an equivalent, or greater, amount. That is what is called “compromise” in Washington.

One positive development from Tuesday is the slightly improved chance for a roll-call vote on “Audit the Fed.” Most of the Senators who are likely to assume leadership roles next year are co-sponsors of the bill. However, special interests that benefit from Fed secrecy are very influential in both parties, so it will be up to the people to continue to pressure Congress for a Senate vote.

Elsewhere, there may also be some rollbacks and reforms of some of the worst parts of ObamaCare, but a full repeal of the bill is unlikely. This is not just because there are still not the votes to override an inevitable veto. The insurance and pharmaceutical lobbies that benefit from ObamaCare are equally influential in both parties and have very deep pockets.

I ended my comments on election night by pointing out that while it may have been an important election, it was not most important ever. Ideas are what really count. And that is where we are winning!