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Freedom of Information Act Release Mistakenly Includes US Gov’t. Mind Control Documentation

By Aaron Kessel | Activist Post

Accidental FOIA reveals mind control documents; here’s further evidence this technology exists

Journalist Curtis Waltman filed a Freedom of Information Act request with the Washington State Fusion Center (which is partnered with Department of Homeland Security) to obtain information about Antifa and white supremacist groups; instead of getting information on how the agency targets the groups, he got way more than the information he was looking for – Curtis was accidentally sent a mysterious file with the label “EM effects on human body.zip.” The file included methods of “remote mind control,” MuckRock reported.

According to MuckRock, the mind control documents came from the Department of Homeland Security-linked agency in the form of a file called “EM effects on human body.zip.” The file reportedly contained various diagrams detailing the horrors of “psycho-electronic weapon effects.”

One document lists the various forms of torment made possible by using “remote mind control” methods, from “forced memory blanking” and “sudden violent itching inside eyelids” to “wild flailing” followed by “rigor mortis” and a remotely induced “forced orgasm.” It was not immediately clear how the documents wound up in the agency’s response to a standard FOIA request, but there was reportedly no indication the “remote mind control” files stemmed from any government program.

According to Popular Mechanics, the documents are not official documents but are rather documents captured by the Fusion Center.

The federal government has absolutely experimented with mind control in a variety of methods, but the documents here do not appear to be official.

Waltman had no idea why these documents were included in his request and isn’t sure why the government is holding them. The WSFC did not respond to requests for more information.

The documents themselves are quite bizarre and, honestly, despite reports dismissing them, it is worth remembering that this is exactly what the CIA was working on for years during MKULTRA. That program was supposed to have been shut down after the Church Hearings and other congressional hearings exposed all of the CIA’s clandestine activities at the time many that violated human rights including experimentation on patients and the American population without their knowledge.

Last year, it was revealed that mainstream science had caught up with the black project world (CIA) and had successfully weakened or strengthened particular memories from the brain or outright deleted inherited memories from mice, Activist Post reported.

There was a series of CIA mind control programs including BLUEBIRD, ARTICHOKE, MKULTRA, MKSEARCH and MKNAOMI during the ’50s to ’90s. The CIA sought to blank-slate test subjects wiping memories through drugs, electric shock, high-pitched sound and other torture techniques.

The Project Bluebird/Artichoke document below was kept hidden and under wraps and distracted from other subprojects in MKULTRA through Operation Dormouse for a reason; just read the documents it’s literally the CIA suggesting to create mind-controlled slaves that can covertly commit murder in the 1950s-’60s.

[Read more here]

*Originally entitled: “Accidental FOIA Reveals Mind Control Documents; Here’s Further Evidence This Technology Exists”

Robert O’Leary, JD BARA, has had an abiding interest in alternative health products & modalities since the early 1970’s & he has seen how they have made people go from lacking health to vibrant health. He became an attorney, singer-songwriter, martial artist & father along the way and brings that experience to his practice as a BioAcoustic Soundhealth Practitioner, under the tutelage of the award-winning founder of BioAcoustic Biology, Sharry Edwards, whose Institute of BioAcoustic Biology has now been serving clients for 30 years with a non-invasive & safe integrative modality that supports the body’s ability to self-heal using the power of the human voice. Robert brings this modality to serve clients in Greater Springfield, Massachusetts and New England (USA) & “virtually” the world. He can also be reached at romayasoundhealthandbeauty@gmail.




US Police Spied on Muslims, African Americans: ACLU

Police created alerts to watch hashtags such as #BlackLivesMatter, the ACLU said [Lawrence Bryant/Reuters]

 

By AlJazeera News

Police in the US city of Boston unjustly spied on thousands of social media posts and specifically targeted Muslims and African Americans for surveillance, a new report by the American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU) has alleged.

The Boston Police Department (BPD) used an online surveillance system, Geofeedia, from 2014 to 2016 to monitor online comments on topics including politics and religion, the ACLU of Massachusetts said on Wednesday.

“The BPD treated ordinary citizens discussing ordinary affairs as justifiable targets of surveillance,” the group said in a statement.

“What it did not do … was deter or help solve serious crimes.”

The civil rights organisation said the BPD unfairly focused its surveillance on African Americans and Muslims by creating online alerts for the use of innocuous Arabic words and the hashtags #BlackLivesMatter and #MuslimLivesMatter.

Activists have used the hashtag #BlackLivesMatter to denounce police brutality targeting African-Americans.

#MuslimLivesMatter was used to draw attention to Islamophobia after three Muslim students were killed in a shooting in North Carolina in 2015.

Lack of transparency

Based on documents obtained through a public records request, the ACLU report said police treated people as suspicious on the basis of their race, religion and ethnicity.

“The records demonstrate the clear need for both transparency and procedural safeguards to ensure that this type of software is subject to public scrutiny and ongoing oversight before it is used again,” the group said.

For its part, the BPD has accused the ACLU of reaching misguided conclusions.

It said its surveillance programme helped police monitor events and demonstrations which had the potential to turn violent.

READ THE REST OF THIS ARTICLE……




The US Government Just Destroyed Our Privacy While Nobody Was Paying Attention

By Carey Wedler | The Anti-Media

(ANTIMEDIA) — While the nation remained fixated on gun control and Facebook’s violative practices last week, the U.S. government quietly codified the CLOUD Act, its own intrusive policies on citizens’ data.

While the massive, $1.2 trillion omnibus spending bill passed Friday received widespread media attention, the CLOUD Act — which lawmakers snuck into the end of the 2,300-page bill — was hardly addressed.

The Clarifying Lawful Overseas Use of Data Act (CLOUD) “updates the rules for criminal investigators who want to see emails, documents and other communications stored on the internet,” CNET reported. “Now law enforcement won’t be blocked from accessing someone’s Outlook account, for example, just because Microsoft happens to store the user’s email on servers in Ireland.

The CLOUD Act will also allow the U.S. to enter into agreements that allow the transfer of private data from domestic servers to investigators in other countries on a case-by-case basis, further globalizing the ever-encroaching surveillance state. The Electronic Frontier Foundation, which has strongly opposed the legislation, listed several consequences of the bill, which it called “far-reaching” and “privacy-upending”:

  • Enable foreign police to collect and wiretap people’s communications from U.S. companies, without obtaining a U.S. warrant.
  • Allow foreign nations to demand personal data stored in the United States, without prior review by a judge.
  • Allow the U.S. president to enter “executive agreements” that empower police in foreign nations that have weaker privacy laws than the United States to seize data in the United States while ignoring U.S. privacy laws.
  • Allow foreign police to collect someone’s data without notifying them about it.
  • Empower U.S. police to grab any data, regardless if it’s a U.S. person’s or not, no matter where it is stored.

The bill is an update to the current MLAT (Mutual Legal Assistance Treaty), the current framework for sharing internet user data between countries, which both legislators and tech companies have criticized as inefficient.

Some tech companies, like Microsoft, have endorsed the new CLOUD policy. Brad Smith, the company’s president and chief legal officer, called it  “a strong statute and a good compromise,” that “gives tech companies like Microsoft the ability to stand up for the privacy rights of our customers around the world.”

They echoed the sentiment of lawmakers like Orrin Hatch (R-UT). In February, he said of the bill:

“The CLOUD Act bridges the divide that sometimes exists between law enforcement and the tech sector by giving law enforcement the tools it needs to access data throughout the world while at the same time creating a commonsense framework to encourage international cooperation to resolve conflicts of law.”

But one of the biggest complaints from privacy advocates, however, it that the new legislation places too much-unmitigated power in the hands of governments with abysmal human rights records while also giving too much discretion to the U.S. government’s executive branch. Noting that the executive branch will decide which countries are human rights compliant and that those countries will then be able to engage in data collection and wiretaps without any further restrictions or oversight, the ACLU warned:

Flip through Amnesty International or Human Rights Watch’s recent annual reports, and you can find a dizzying array of countries that have ratified major human rights treaties and reflect those obligations in their domestic laws but, in fact, have arrested, tortured and killed people in retaliation for their activism or due to their identity.”

The organization pointed out that no human rights organizations have endorsed the CLOUD Act, adding that “in the case of countries certified by the executive branch, the CLOUD Act would not require the U.S. government to scrutinize data requests by the foreign governments — indeed, the bill would not even require notifying the U.S. government or a user regarding a request.”

Further, the ACLU says, if a foreign government’s human rights record deteriorates, there is no mechanism to revoke its access to data. Considering the U.S.’ existing record on supporting regimes that severely restrict basic rights like freedom of expression, the expanded access the CLOUD Act provides is undoubtedly worrisome.

Also predictable is the government’s stale justification for expanding its power. As the CLOUD Act claims, it is purportedly to “protect public safety and combat serious crime, including terrorism” — even if it further empowers governments that support and commit said terrorism.

In an age where the government already engages in mass surveillance and is eager to disable the people’s efforts to protect their privacy through encryption technology, it is unsurprising, albeit dangerous, that Congress continues to encroach on what little is left of safeguards against unwarranted intrusions.

Creative Commons / Anti-Media / Report a typo

Read more great articles at The Anti-Media.




Edward Snowden Leaks New Documents Showing That The NSA Worked “Urgently” To Target Bitcoin Users

Image via Collective Evolution

Arjun Walia | Collective Evolution

New leaks from Edward Snowden, the NSA whistle-blower who leaked a wealth of information on the NSA’s mass global surveillance program a few years ago, among other leaks, has just released new documentation showing that the NSA worked ‘urgently’ to target bitcoin users.

Classified documents from Snowden, in the form of a passage in an internal NSA report from March 2013, shows how tracking down senders and receivers of Bitcoin allowed the NSA to better collect and analyze global internet traffic, “while also exploiting an unnamed software program that purported to offer anonymity to users, according to other documents.”

It wasn’t just bitcoin they were keeping tabs on, but also multiple cryptocurrencies, and according to the NSA report, “Bitcoin is #1 priority.”

The intercept goes on to explain how,

“The documents indicate that “tracking down” bitcoin users went well beyond closely examining bitcoin’s public transaction ledger, known as the Blockchain, where users are typically referred to through anonymous identifiers; the tracking may also have involved gathering intimate details of these users’ computers. The NSA collected some bitcoin users’ password information, internet activity, and a type of unique device identification number known as a MAC address, a March 29, 2013 NSA memo suggested. In the same document, analysts also discussed tracking internet users’ internet addresses, network ports, and timestamps to identify “BITCOIN Targets.”

This isn’t really a surprise, as venture capitalist and former Facebook exec, Chamath Palihapitiya once expressed that anything that is not in the hands of, or in control of the ‘1 percent,’ or under government control, should receive a lot of attention and is a great indicator of its potential.

“This is a fantastic fundamental hedge and store value against autocratic regimes and banking infrastructure that we know is corrosive to how the world needs to work properly. You cannot have Central Banks infinitely printing currency, you cannot have folks with misguided and misdirected monetary and fiscal policy…It’s a con game.”
– Chamath Palihapitiya (source)

 

Currency has always been, not just in my opinion but based on what we see in society, a means to control the human race. It has also been used as a tool to further widen the wealth gap, putting most of the resources in the hands of the “1 percent.”

Cryptocurrencies could be a stepping stone in eventually living in a world without currency at all. And yes, I do believe that’s possible, I often enjoy imagining a planet where the civilization has moved beyond currency, and everybody is cooperating with each other to better the lives of the whole, thus bettering the lives of the individual.

Another great quote that applies,

“It is well enough that people of the nation do not understand our banking and monetary system, before if they did, I believe there would be a revolution before tomorrow morning.”
– Henry Ford

Bitcoin, in my opinion based on the simple fact that it’s not centralized, but controlled by the people, and not controlled by the global elite who currently use our financial system (which they created), to, in some sense, enslave us, is why it’s attracting so much attention.

So why did and does the NSA keep track on Bitcoin and its users?

“Bitcoin is money outside of government, controlled by the people who become their own sovereignty. Bitcoin will do the nation-state what the printing press did to the church…The use-case as stateless money drives adoption because it’s universally appealing and fills a void every human being feels in their soul: to be free.”  – Max Kieser (source)

Perhaps this is why, because blockchain technology is the genius behind Bitcoin, and its very design is what excites many people. It is likely what has skyrocketed Bitcoin’s popularity. With this technology, all records and transactions are stored publicly so there is a public and transparent ledger for every coin and transaction. And it’s not limited to just currency, it also stores data, information, and ownership records. There are also blockchains that focus more on privacy as well, for those concerned with that.

READ THE REST OF THIS ARTICLE……….




Responsibility Deflected, The CLOUD Act Passes

Image via Activist Post

 

David Ruiz | Activist Post

“People deserve the right to a better process.”

Those are the words of Jim McGovern, representative for Massachusetts and member of the House of Representatives Committee on Rules, when, after 8:00 PM EST on Wednesday, he and his colleagues were handed a 2,232-page bill to review and approve for a floor vote by the next morning.

In the final pages of the bill—meant only to appropriate future government spending—lawmakers snuck in a separate piece of legislation that made no mention of funds, salaries, or budget cuts. Instead, this final, tacked-on piece of legislation will erode privacy protections around the globe.

This bill is the CLOUD Act. It was never reviewed or marked up by any committee in either the House or the Senate. It never received a hearing. It was robbed of a stand-alone floor vote because Congressional leadership decided, behind closed doors, to attach this un-vetted, unrelated data bill to the $1.3 trillion government spending bill. Congress has a professional responsibility to listen to the American people’s concerns, to represent their constituents, and to debate the merits and concerns of this proposal amongst themselves, and this week, they failed.

On Thursday, the House approved the omnibus government spending bill, with the CLOUD Act attached, in a 256-167 vote. The Senate followed up late that night with a 65-32 vote in favor. All the bill requires now is the president’s signature.

Make no mistake—you spoke up. You emailed your representatives. You told them to protect privacy and to reject the CLOUD Act, including any efforts to attach it to must-pass spending bills. You did your part. It is Congressional leadership—negotiating behind closed doors—who failed.

Because of this failure, U.S. and foreign police will have new mechanisms to seize data across the globe. Because of this failure, your private emails, your online chats, your Facebook, Google, Flickr photos, your Snapchat videos, your private lives online, your moments shared digitally between only those you trust, will be open to foreign law enforcement without a warrant and with few restrictions on using and sharing your information. Because of this failure, U.S. laws will be bypassed on U.S. soil.

As we wrote before, the CLOUD Act is a far-reaching, privacy-upending piece of legislation that will:

  • Enable foreign police to collect and wiretap people’s communications from U.S. companies, without obtaining a U.S. warrant.
  • Allow foreign nations to demand personal data stored in the United States, without prior review by a judge.
  • Allow the U.S. president to enter “executive agreements” that empower police in foreign nations that have weaker privacy laws than the United States to seize data in the United States while ignoring U.S. privacy laws.
  • Allow foreign police to collect someone’s data without notifying them about it.
  • Empower U.S. police to grab any data, regardless if it’s a U.S. person’s or not, no matter where it is stored.

And, as we wrote before, this is how the CLOUD Act could work in practice:

London investigators want the private Slack messages of a Londoner they suspect of bank fraud. The London police could go directly to Slack, a U.S. company, to request and collect those messages. The London police would not necessarily need prior judicial review for this request. The London police would not be required to notify U.S. law enforcement.

Predictably, in this request, the London police might also collect Slack messages written by U.S. persons communicating with the Londoner suspected of bank fraud. Those messages could be read, stored, and potentially shared, all without the U.S. person knowing about it. Those messages, if shared with U.S. law enforcement, could be used to criminally charge the U.S. person in a U.S. court, even though a warrant was never issued.

This bill has large privacy implications both in the U.S. and abroad. It was never given the attention it deserved in Congress.

As Rep. McGovern said, the people deserve the right to a better process.

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David Ruiz is a writer covering NSA surveillance and federal surveillance policy for EFF’s activism team, where this article first appeared.

 

 




AnyVision’s Facial Recognition Cameras Are Being Installed In “Smart Cities” Everywhere

By MassPrivateI | Activist Post

Everywhere you turn politicians and corporations are trying to convince the public we need to convert our cities into ‘smart cities’.

Last week AnyVision and Nvidia announced that they are working together to put facial recognition cameras in cities across the globe. AnyVision is an Israel-based company that profits from spying on everyone.

NVidia has partnered with AI developer AnyVision to create facial recognition technology for “smart cities” around the world. The two companies will work to install automatic facial recognition into CCTV (closed-circuit television) surveillance cameras. (Source)

Five months ago, I warned everyone that Nvidia also wants to turn police vehicles into 360 degree facial recognition platforms.

Facial recognition cameras are being used to spy on everyone.

Facial recognition cameras identify marathon runners in real-time

AnyVision claims their facial recognition technology can detect, track and recognize any person of interest with more than 99% accuracy. Their video also claims they can identify marathon runners in real-time.

New York Marathon from AnyVision on Vimeo.

Soon nowhere will be safe from law enforcement’s prying eyes.

AnyVision utilizes NVidia hardware to achieve high-speed, real-time face recognition from surveillance video streams. Our system is highly optimized for GPU acceleration allowing us to deliver real-time analysis of streaming data whilst achieving unprecedented accuracy. (Source)

Nearly a year ago, I warned everyone that ‘smart cities’ are being run by the CIA, DHS and the NDOT.

But it gets worse — private companies are being used to do an end-run around our Bill of Rights.

Mashable asks, “is this technology terrifying, and possibly everything Orwell warned us about?  Absolutely.”

Companies like Philips Lighting, Siemens, IntellistreetsShotPoint and ShotSpotter are all working together to install facial recognition cameras and microphones in every city in America.

Don’t be fooled, ‘smart cities’ are really just a euphemism for total control.

You can read more at the MassPrivateI blog, where this article first appeared.

Read more great articles at Activist Post.




Boston Police Waste Taxpayer Money Violating Law Through Illegal Surveillance Of Citizenry

Photo Credit: ArsTechnica

By Aaron Kesel |  Activist Post

Boston Police effectively broke the law by illegally surveilling social media users for years to conduct online surveillance in 2014, 2015, and 2016, without telling the city council, and violating civilians right to free speech, a new blog post by the ACLU alleges.

In December 2016, the Boston City Council held a hearing to discuss the Boston Police Department’s plan to spend $1.4 million on a social media surveillance system called Geofeedia.  After news of the department’s plans became public news, Boston Police Commissioner William Evans claimed at the time, “We’re not going after ordinary people. It’s a necessary tool of law enforcement and helps in keeping our neighborhoods safe from violence, as well as terrorism, human trafficking, and young kids who might be the victim of a pedophile.”

However, the plans were scrapped by skeptical city council members, Mayor Marty Walsh and Commissioner Evans. Leading up to 2016, since as far back as 2014 according to the documents, the department secretly monitored social media posts of thousands of ordinary Bostonians with other surveillance software that were not named by the report. The police even spied on a thensitting City Councilor, Tito Jackson — who was, ironically enough, a critic of the BPD’s 2016 plan to buy the outrageously overpriced system, the report stated.

The Geofeedia software was first used on a trial basis for two weeks in January 2014 and then for another two weeks in November 2014 without any type of approval from the city council. The documents show that during this two-week trial of Geofeedia in November 2014, BPD used the software to monitor and collect social media posts about protests in Boston in support of the Black Lives Matter movement.

report released today by the ACLU of Massachusetts details the BPD’s use of the social media monitoring software in 2014, 2015, and 2016, which found that disturbing abuses of human rights occurred in complete secret. Based on the records obtained through the Massachusetts Public Records Law, the report revealed that employees at BRIC used the software to scan and collect thousands of posts of unsuspecting users containing specific terms/phrases on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, YouTube, YikYak, and Flickr just to name a few.

But there is just one problem: the keywords used by BPD targeted speech related to race, religion, and political activity, but didn’t turn up any evidence of violence, solving serious crimes or terrorism as the plan was marketed. Instead, the BPD violated several Bostonians’ privacy rights and targeted users’ First Amendment protected free speech.

Further, Geofeedia used terms associated with political activism, like “#blacklivesmatter” and “protest.” Bizarrely, and perhaps unsurprisingly, Geofeedia received funding from the CIA’s venture capital arm In-Q-Tel.

BPD ceased using Geofeedia in 2016, after the ACLU of Northern California revealed that Geofeedia literally marketed itself to law enforcement as a tool to “keep track of protesters.”

In 2017, the Department officially announced it was withdrawing its contentious $1.4 million proposals for a new social media surveillance system. However, the door was left ajar for a similar social media surveillance system in the future and the BPD hasn’t been punished for its use.

The ACLU is calling on the Boston City Council to create a regulated, public means that would require the BPD and other city agencies to adhere to before acquiring or using surveillance technology. The report also recommended that the BPD should change its policy to prohibit surveillance and collection on any individuals based on their “race, religion, national origin, and protected political speech and association, except in cases where the Department has reasonable grounds to believe that a person has committed a crime. Additionally, the report further states that police should not collect or share the information of individuals “who are not suspected of specific articulable, criminal activity, with designated, enumerated exceptions for situations like missing persons’ investigations.”

The ACLU added that state legislators should immediately pass the Fundamental Freedoms Act to protect citizens against unwarranted surveillance of their free speech except in extreme conditions where an individual is suspected under legal grounds to have committed a crime and there free speech would help assist law enforcement in their investigation.

It’s worth noting that in 2012, the ACLU and National Lawyers Guild published a report based on BPD documents which showed that the Department tracked the activities of antiwar and peace activists in the city, producing  “intelligence reports” about individuals and organizations that were labeled with terms like “HOMESEC-DOMESTIC” and “EXTREMIST.”

BPD spent over $26,000 on Geofeedia subscriptions over approximately 16 months, wasted on nothing more than spying on users; there is no proof provided in the documents that any crimes were ever stopped or any arrest ever occurred except for potentially harassing people for riding dirt bikes for “reckless driving.”

A 2014 survey of 1,200 law enforcement agencies found that 80 percent used some form of social media surveillance, the report noted.

In recent years Activist Post has told you about a slew of surveillance tracking software including Twitter’s ChatterGrabber, a program that was “used to monitor tickborne diseases, such as Lyme disease, public sentiment involving vaccines, and gun violence and terrorism, serving as an early warning system for public health officials through suspicious tweets or conversations.”

Then there is the pre-fake news Truthy study which fits more into what BPD were doing with Geofeedia. The study used Twitter’s full database to study political language focusing on the spread of “political smears, astroturfing, misinformation, and other social pollution,” researchers said.

Truthy was an ensemble of web services and tools to demonstrate applications of data mining research (a fancy word for spying), from visualizing meme diffusion patterns to detecting social bots on Twitter. Ironically, the now-sitting head of the FCC Ajit Pai who got rid of net neutrality, stated that the study had “come straight out of a George Orwell novel.”

Surveillance of ordinary citizens happens all the time from social experiments like Facebook’s infamous emotional experiment to Truthy, to police and law enforcement agencies prying into users’ private lives or through the creation of a Stasi web of surveillance asking citizens to tattle on each other with their smartphones. It’s not just the NSA spying that was revealed by whistleblower Edward Snowden; the problem is far more vast, and the scary thing is no one seems to care that we are walking straight into 1984.




First They Came For Free Travel: ICE Agents Will Access Massive License Plate Database in Real Time

 

By Claire S. Bernish | The Mind Unleashed

A gestapo-style crackdown on immigrants in the United States illegally undoubtedly pleases nationalists eager to “take their country back” from the perceived threat such people might pose to, for instance, the menial physical labor job pool — but the zeal with which Dreamers and workers and asylum-seekers have been rounded up and deported overshadows the methods ICE agents have at their disposal — and any one of them could and may already have been used against you.

In fact, the Verge reported Friday U.S. will now be privy to a capacious database of license plates — data reaped by private corporations in the course of standard operations by automated license-plate readers, such as agencies tasked with vehicle repossession, but also that from various levels of law enforcement, including material collected by patrol-car mounted cameras — in what has been widely reported a dire portent of the agency’s scorched earth immigration tactics allowed to flourish under President Trump.

ICE signed a contract with Vigilant Solutions, according to the Verge, giving the government agency the ability to peer into the information for some two billion license plates it has amassed over the years in partnership with private firms and local law enforcement — data collected by now-ubiquitous plate-readers around the U.S.

As terrifying as that should be, two camps of thought dismiss the plan as either necessary to carry out the law or that ICE accessing the information pertaining to billions of wholly innocent Americans is just not that big a deal.

Both camps are dead wrong — for a plethora of constitutional rights-eradicating reasons.

Details the Verge [emphasis added]:

“While it collects few photos itself, Vigilant Solutions has amassed a database of more than 2 billion license plate photos by ingesting data from partners like vehicle repossession agencies and other private groups. Vigilant also partners with local law enforcement agencies, often collecting even more data from camera-equipped police cars. The result is a massive vehicle-tracking network generating as many as 100 million sightings per month, each tagged with a date, time, and GPS coordinates of the sighting.

“ICE agents would be able to query that database in two ways. A historical search would turn up every place a given license plate has been spotted in the last five years, a detailed record of the target’s movements. That data could be used to find a given subject’s residence or even identify associates if a given car is regularly spotted in a specific parking lot.”

Further still, “ICE agents can also receive instantaneous email alerts whenever a new record of a particular plate is found — a system known internally as a ‘hot list.’ (The same alerts can also be funneled to the Vigilant’s iOS app.) According to the privacy assessment, as many as 2,500 license plates could be uploaded to the hot list in a single batch, although the assessment does not detail how often new batches can be added. With sightings flooding in from police dashcams and stationary readers on bridges and toll booths, it would be hard for anyone on the list to stay unnoticed for long.”

 

READ THE REST OF THIS ARTICLE…..




Kentucky House Passes Bill to Put Limits on Drones, Help Thwart Federal Surveillance Program

Image via Activist Post

By Michael Maharrey | Activist Post

 

Yesterday, the Kentucky House unanimously passed a bill that would require police to get a warrant before engaging in drone surveillance in most situations. Final passage of this legislation would not only establish important privacy protections at the state level, it would also help thwart the federal surveillance state.

Rep. Diane St. Onge (R-Lakeside Park) and Rep. Reginald Meeks (D-Louisville) introduced House Bill 22 (HB22) on Jan. 2. The legislation would prohibit the use of a drone for a “search” unless authorized under the Fourth Amendment to the United States Constitution and Section 10 of the Kentucky Constitution. This would require police to get a warrant before conducting drone surveillance in most situations. In order for the search to be valid, the warrant would have to specifically authorize the use of an unmanned aircraft system.

The proposed law would require police to minimize data collection on non-suspects and would prohibit the disclosure of any such data without a court order.

Any evidence collected in violation of the law would be inadmissible as evidence in any civil, criminal, or administrative proceeding in the state.

HB22 would also prohibit the operation of any drone equipped with a lethal payload.

The House passed HB22 by a 94-0 vote.

A similar bill passed the Kentucky House during the 2017 session, but never made it to the Senate floor for a vote.

Impact on the Federal Surveillance State

Although the proposed law would only apply to state and local drone use, it throws a high hurdle in front of some federal programs.

According to a report by the Electronic Frontier Foundation, drones can be equipped with various types of surveillance equipment that can collect high definition video and still images day and night. Drones can be equipped with technology allowing them to intercept cell phone calls, determine GPS locations, and gather license plate information. Drones can be used to determine whether individuals are carrying guns. Synthetic-aperture radar can identify changes in the landscape, such as footprints and tire tracks. Some drones are even equipped with facial recognition.According to research from the Center for the Study of the Drone at Bard College, 347 U.S. police, sheriff, fire, and emergency response units acquired drones between 2009 and early 2017—primarily sheriff’s offices and local police departments.

Much of the funding for drones at the state and local level comes from the federal government, in and of itself a constitutional violation. In return, federal agencies tap into the information gathered by state and local law enforcement through fusion centers and a federal program known as the information sharing environment.

According to its website, the ISE “provides analysts, operators, and investigators with information needed to enhance national security. These analysts, operators, and investigators… have mission needs to collaborate and share information with each other and with private sector partners and our foreign allies.” In other words, ISE serves as a conduit for the sharing of information gathered without a warrant.

The federal government encourages and funds a network of drones at the state and local level across the U.S., thereby gaining access to a massive data pool on Americans without having to expend the resources to collect the information itself. By placing restrictions on drone use, state and local governments limit the data available that the feds can access.

Currently, 18 states—Alaska, Florida, Idaho, Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Maine, Montana, Nevada, North Carolina, North Dakota, Oregon, Tennessee, Texas, Utah, Vermont, Virginia, and Wisconsin—require law enforcement agencies in certain circumstances to obtain a search warrant to use drones for surveillance or to conduct a search.

In a nutshell, without state and local cooperation, the feds have a much more difficult time gathering information. This represents a major blow to the surveillance state and a win for privacy.

WHAT’S NEXT

HB22 will now move to the Senate for further consideration. Last year, the House passed a similar bill, but the session ended before it came up for a vote in the Senate.

 




Russia Planning National Biometric Database For Banking Next Year, Expanding Worldwide Trend

Image via Activist Post

By Aaron Kesel | Activist Post

 

Russia is to start a biometric database for financial services starting next summer, the Central Bank of Russia said in a statement.

The system, although not mandatory, will extend access to banking by letting customers open accounts without having to visit a banking branch. This is all in an effort to “digitize” financial services. The regulator noted that data would only be stored with a person’s consent.

However, what the biometric database will include is worrying to say the least.

The biometric database will incorporate images of faces, voice samples and, eventually, irises and fingerprints.

With constant hacks against corporations including credit agency Equifax here in the U.S., which was threatened in September to pay in Bitcoin or else, putting all of someone’s physical identification in one place is a nightmarish scenario. Especially with the rise of using biometric data (fingerprints and facial recognition) to unlock cell phones.

Imagine someone hacks your bank biometric information – they now have your full identity and are free to access your phone and other services that use your fingerprint and face as if they were you. This enables blackmailing with access to all your private information, text, and pictures.

The biometric effort is being backed by Russian state-owned Rostelecom, and Sberbank PJSC who has been selected to run the database, Bloomberg reported.

Last month, PJSC acquired a 25% stake in a company called VisionLabs as a first step toward building a biometric platform to identify people through face, voice and retina recognition technologies.

Rostelecom’s board chairman is Sergei Ivanov, a former KGB agent who was President Vladimir Putin’s chief of staff until last year and is currently among those sanctioned by the U.S. for Russia’s 2014 annexation of Crimea from Ukraine.

The law will take effect six months after it’s passed. The database could also be expanded for use by microfinance organizations and government services, the central bank added.

Russia isn’t the only country planning to implement a biometric database. China has also turned its nation into George Orwell’s nightmare.

China’s Ministry of Public Security, which oversees the database, has amassed biometric information for more than 40 million people it was reported in 2015. The Communist country has the world’s biggest database of DNA information according to a report published by Human Rights Watch (HRW) just this year. For comparison, in the US, the FBI’s national DNA index has 12.7 million offender profiles.

“Mass DNA collection by the powerful Chinese police absent effective privacy protections or an independent judicial system is a perfect storm for abuses,” Sophie Richardson, China director at HRW said. “China is moving its Orwellian system to the genetic level.”

A follow-up report published earlier this month by the human rights watchdog group revealed that there was even a program which has gathered biometric data—including fingerprints, iris scans, blood-type, and DNA—on millions of residents in six regions in Xinjiang in 2017 under the guise of a free public health program providing physical examinations.

That’s not all. According to the organization, the Chinese government is even collecting “voice pattern” samples of individuals to establish a national voice biometric database.

The group stated authorities are collaborating with iFlytek, a Chinese company that produces 80 percent of all speech recognition technology in the country, to develop a pilot surveillance system that can automatically identify targeted voices in phone conversations.

“The Chinese government has been collecting the voice patterns of tens of thousands of people with little transparency about the program or laws regulating who can be targeted or how that information is going to be used,” said Sophie Richardson, China director. “Authorities can easily misuse that data in a country with a long history of unchecked surveillance and retaliation against critics.”

Here in the U.S. the DHS is planning a biometric facial recognition database for border checkpoints and to create the Homeland Advanced Recognition Technology (HART) to store 500 million people, including many US citizens’ identities within its system.

HART will no doubt link into the FBI’s NGI (Next Generation Identification System.) The FBI uses the system for a number of criminal cases a few are listed below.

As detailed on the FBI’s website:

  • The Interstate Photo System contains 23 million front-facing photographs that can be used to identify suspects without human intervention.
  • The Repository for Individuals of Special Concern (RISC) allows agents in the field to rapidly identify detainees and criminal suspects by searching a repository of Wanted Persons, Sex Offenders Registry Subjects, Known or appropriately Suspected Terrorists, and other persons of special interest.
  • The Latents and National Palm Print System is an updated database of finger and palm prints that can be searched on a nationwide basis.
  • The Rap Back Service notifies agencies of the activity of individuals after “the initial processing and retention of criminal or civil transactions.” The service can “notify agencies of subsequent activity for individuals enrolled in the service. Including a more timely process of confirming the suitability of those individuals placed in positions of trust and notification to users of criminal activity for those individuals placed on probation or parole.”
  • Iris Recognition is “poised to offer law enforcement a new tool to quickly and accurately determine identity.”

Facebook has long used facial recognition software to identify its users that upload photographs and offers facial recognition as a method of verifying a user is who they say they are.

The Electronic Frontier Foundation is currently working with allied organizations to oppose mandatory national ID cards and biometric databases. According to EFF’s website, there is an expanding list of countries that have introduced biometric ID databases including Argentina, Belgium, Colombia, Germany, Italy, Peru, and Spain.

That list will soon include Russia, the U.S., and other countries within the European Union. Privacy will cease to exist if we let it and will be a thing of the past. As Benjamin Franklin said, “Those who would give up essential Liberty, to purchase a little temporary Safety, deserve neither Liberty nor Safety.”




Confirmed: New York City’s Public WiFi Stations Are Spying On You With Cameras

By Kevin Samson | Activist Post

If there is ever a perfect example of dual-use technology, it is WiFi connectivity. I’ve already covered the mounting evidence that our ubiquitous gadgets and wireless connections are doing irreparable physical harm, especially to the young and to pregnant women, but the concern about surveillance is running a parallel track.

So, when New York City announced its LinkNYC program in early 2016 to convert 7,500 public payphones into WiFi stations, I sounded the alarm about the threat it potentially posed to civil liberties.

Part of what concerned me the most is that corporations such as Qualcomm would be involved to offset the $200 million dollar cost of implementation. The city of New York would receive half of all profits, thus forming a dangerous merger of corporations with government. Additionally, data would be harvested so that information could be used to direct advertising. Officials claimed that all details collected would be anonymized, but we’ve seen that to be an empty assurance too many times.

Now that the LinkNYC program is approaching the two-year mark, it seems that those early concerns were not mere paranoia. A surprising report from mainstream Huffpost couldn’t ignore new issues that are cropping up across the city.

Apparently, a group of activists has identified the devices to have front-facing cameras, and have taken it upon themselves to cover the cameras with Post-It notes to cover them up.  However, a LinkNYC team subsequently began sweeps to remove them … and so a front-lines privacy battle has ensued:

Starting on a number of blocks on the Upper West Side, an unknown number of digital protesters has begun to adhere yellow post-it-notes onto the Kiosks, effectively blocking the camera’s view.

Then, late a night, a van marked LinkNYC drives up Broadway where a worker with a long stick with a scraper clears the Post-its. But within days, the Post-Its return.

Huffpost reached out to civil liberties organizations EFF and the NYCLU, but both denied knowledge of any sort of activist campaign against the program. However, both reiterated their fundamental concerns about a program which has had little to no input from the public prior to full implementation.

EFF previously has defined the scope of data collection that includes “IP addresses, anonymized MAC addresses, device type, device identifiers, and more…”

Perhaps even more troubling are the parameters of data retention, where the issue of the front-facing cameras becomes truly paramount. According to EFF, data is retained “for up to 60 days. Additionally, the LinkNYC kiosks have cameras that store footage for up to 7 days.”

Moreover, in an era of fusion centers and the overall surveillance matrix that feeds everything into databases designed (supposedly) for anti-terror functions, the NYCLU states their additional concerns:

We would like to know whether the environmental sensors and cameras will be routinely feeding into any City or NYPD systems, including the Domain Awareness System; if so, that should be made explicit in the privacy policy.”

The fact that privacy concerns clearly were not placed at the top of the list by LinkNYC and the CityBridge private consortium with whom they now partner should speak volumes to New Yorkers as well as any other city that intends to implement citywide “public” WiFi.

Article source: Huffpost

Image: LinkNYC

Kevin Samson writes for Activist Post. Support us at Patreon. Follow us on FacebookTwitterSteemit, andBitChute. Ready for solutions? Subscribe to our premium newsletter Counter Markets.

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Fed Gov’t Just Admitted It Will Continue Warrantless Spying—Even If Congress Votes to Stop It

By Rachel Blevins | Activist Post

As the United States Congress runs out of time to vote on a bill that would reauthorize one of the government’s most egregious warrantless spying programs, officials are claiming that those programs won’t end anytime soon—even if they are not reauthorized by the end of the year.

The USA Liberty Act will reauthorize Section 702 of the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Act (FISA), which is set to expire on Dec. 31, 2017. While the bill’s proponents have claimed it will help ensure “security” in the United States, privacy advocates have warned that will provide additional loopholes for the government to continue conducting warrantless surveillance of innocent Americans.

The assumption may be that if the USA Liberty Act is not signed into law, then the provisions from Section 702 will no longer be legal and the U.S. government will stop collecting data from innocent Americans without warrants—but intelligence officials do not see it that way.

A spokesman for the Office of the Director of National Intelligence, Brian Hale, told the New York Times that “the government believes it can keep the program going for months,” even if it is not reauthorized.

Hale’s reasoning stems from the fact that every year, the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Court authorizes the program to operate for the next 12 months. Section 702 was last authorized by the court on April 26, 2017, leaving some lawmakers hopeful that even if the Liberty Act does not pass before the end of the year, Congress will find a way reauthorize Section 702 before it actually expires on April 26, 2018.

Hale cited the “Transition Procedures” for the provision, which accompany the law in federal statute books. He told the Times that the procedures make it “very clear” that “any existing order will continue in effect for a short time even if Congress doesn’t act to reauthorize the law in a timely fashion.”

According to the definitions of Transition Procedures for the Protect America Act of 2007’s provisions for “Challenge of Directives, Protection from Liability; Use of Information” concerning the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Act, Section 702 “shall continue to apply with respect to any directive issued pursuant to section 702 of such Act.”

While this loophole may give hope to some government officials who are in favor of violating Americans’ constitutional rights while selling them a false sense of security, NSA Whistleblower Edward Snowden referred to it by writing on Twitter, “Bypass the Fourth Amendment with one weird trick.”

The Times also cited anonymous intelligence officials who reportedly said that the government is making no plans to immediately turn off the program on New Year’s Day, no matter what happens in Congress.”

Sen. Ron Wyden, a Democrat from Oregon, told the Times that he is prepared to have “a full and open debate” over the legality of the USA Liberty Act, even if Congress delays that debate until next year.

We’ve seen this movie before: wait until the last minute, and then say, ‘crowded congressional calendar, dangerous world, we’ve just got to go along with it,’” Wyden said. “Anything now that creates an opportunity for several months of real debate, I’ll listen to.”

Rep. Justin Amash, a Republican from Michigan, has also been critical of the USA Liberty Act. When it passed the House Judiciary Committee by a vote of 27-8 last month, Amash noted that all privacy advocates should be concerned about the overwhelming support the bill is receiving from Congress.

“The Liberty Act passed committee 27-8. It allows the government to search our private data without a warrant—in violation of the 4th Amendment,” Amash wrote on Twitter. “It’s another bill, like the Freedom Act, that furthers violations of our rights under the guise of protecting our rights.”

While advocates of the USA Liberty Act will claim that it is necessary in order to ensure that Americans are “safe,” it is important to remember that the surveillance programs that were adopted after 9/11 have never actually stopped a terrorist attack on U.S. soil. In the same way that the USA Patriot Act was the opposite of patriotic in 2001, the USA Freedom Act also took away freedom in 2015. Do not be fooled by the title—the USA Liberty Act in 2017 has nothing to do with expanding “liberty.”

Rachel Blevins is a Texas-based journalist who aspires to break the left/right paradigm in media and politics by pursuing truth and questioning existing narratives. Follow Rachel on Facebook, Twitter and YouTube. This article first appeared at The Free Thought Project.

 




Connecticut About To Implement Expanded Drone and Surveillance Program

Image Credit: Anti-Media

By Nicholas West | Activist Post

 

Hartford – While a battle has been raging for years in Los Angeles, California over a proposal to give drones to the LAPD for use in limited circumstances such as counter-terrorism and hostage rescue, Hartford, Connecticut is apparently embracing the broadest possible scope for their new program of drones and surveillance cameras.

Unlike L.A., which saw fierce resistance mounted by civil liberties groups and activists such as the Stop LAPD Spying Coalition, there seems to be no such pushback in Hartford – in fact, part of the program involves citizen cooperation.

The Hartford program is an expansion of a fusion center network that is already in place called the Real-Time Crime and Data Intelligence Center. The current matrix of more than 700 cameras will receive an influx of $2.5 million more in 2018 to boost the number of cameras, as well as expand their presence into even more private areas:

Police are also partnering with residents to put cameras outside homes, offering better visibility of smaller streets. Residents can link the footage into the city’s network.

(Police Chief) Foley said some Hartford dwellers have already contacted the department about participating. Officers will determine what the need is in each area.

One might be excused for wishing to boost surveillance in order to thwart violence in documented high-crime areas, but the new program goes far beyond identification and quick response. In fact, it is admittedly going to be used for pre-crime detection as well as social engineering to better control what they are euphemistically calling “quality-of-life issues.”

Here are the supposedly outrageous threats and concerns that are being used to justify a completely Orwellian matrix of total surveillance and control.

  • New software will be used to analyze crime and traffic patterns and capture suspects.
  • Police will use the technology to crack down on quality-of-life issues, such as illegal dumping, ATVs and dirt bikes, motor vehicle violations, narcotics markets, car break-ins and larcenies.
  • “If a camera is watching a neighborhood and sees constant traffic going in and out of a doorway, it can tell that that’s where the drugs are being purchased.” — Hartford Deputy Police Chief Brian Foley
  • “It’ll help tell us where people are crossing the streets, where the most dangerous areas for pedestrians are. There’s so much they can build into it.”
  • Instead of engaging in high speed chases, police will now send drones to follow cars or ATVs.
  • The drones will monitor festivals, concerts, marathons and other public events in Hartford.
  • Footage from hundreds of cameras is fed into the center, and workers compile information from license-plate readers and a ShotSpotter system that tracks the sound of gunfire.

I hope I am mistaken in saying that there is not currently any resistance to the imposition of this spy network. The city claims that they still need to properly create the policy to incorporate drones into the network, so people need to speak up quickly if they care.

If any readers know of local civil liberties groups or activists doing their best to see that proper restraints are placed upon Hartford police, please leave the information in the comment section.

 

Source: Hartford Courant




US Police Covertly Spy on Innocent Citizens with Military Hardware

Image via @ Lucas Jackson / Reuters

By RT.com

Dozens of police departments across the US are using special devices to track suspects without warrants. However, the International Mobile Subscriber Identity (IMSI) catchers also capture data from regular people on the street.

The technology, which was developed for the military, mimics cell phone towers and tricks phones into routing signals through them. This allows police to a track suspect’s location. The machines even allow police to get the location of a phone without the user making a call or sending a text. The most common of these devices is called a “StingRay.”

Such devices can also collect the phone numbers a person has been calling and texting and even intercept the content of communications.

At least 72 state and local law enforcement departments in 24 states and 13 federal agencies use the devices, according to a new report from AP. The report notes that further details are hard to come by because the departments that use IMSI catchers must take the unusual step of signing non-disclosure agreements overseen by the FBI.

An FBI spokeswoman told the news agency that the agreements, which regularly involve the defense contractor that makes the machines, are intended to prevent the release of sensitive law enforcement information to the general public. Last year, the House Oversight and Government Reform Committee released a report that found the Justice Department and the Department of Homeland Security had spent a combined $95 million on 434 cell-site simulators between 2010 and 2014.

READ THE REST OF THIS ARTICLE……..




They Thought She Was Insane Before Doctor Finds RFID Chip In a Sex Trafficking Victim

By Kale Brown | Collective Evolution

Human trafficking remains a major problem worldwide, and it’s not just pimps and escaped convicts involved. It’s politicians, the elite, wealthy businessmen, your neighbours, and oftentimes the people that you’d least expect. There was an astonishing 35.7% increase in the amount of human trafficking victims in the U.S. between 2015 and 2016, and that’s just the known number of victims. This begs the question: Are we getting better at finding them, or are an increasing number of people being forced to sell their bodies? Sadly, statistics suggest the latter.

Technology has played an integral role in finding these victims in recent years; however, technology can also enable human trafficking through the dark net and even through the use of Radio Frequency Identification (RFID) chips. One doctor recently came forward, whose identity will be kept anonymous, to share his story in surgically removing an RFID chip in a female sex trafficking victim. How can the healthcare system help these victims and what can we do to put an end to human trafficking?

Doctor Extracts RFID Chip From Sex Trafficking Victim

In October 2016, a 28-year-old woman walked into a hospital claiming that she had a tracker inside of her body. Although the doctor said the woman looked respectable, the nurses and doctors on site were still skeptical of her story, until they gave her an X-ray.

“Embedded in the right side of her flank is a small metallic object only a little bit larger than a grain of rice. But it’s there. It’s unequivocally there. She has a tracker in her. And no one was speaking for like five seconds — and in a busy ER that’s saying something,” the doctor explained.

As it turned out, that small metal object was an RFID chip. “It’s used to tag cats and dogs. And someone had tagged her like an animal, like she was somebody’s pet that they owned,” he continued.

It’s important to note that RFID chips aren’t like every other tracking device or GPS system. The type of chip that was inside this woman could only have been used to track her if the person tracking her was nearby. This means that she was likely kept in a confined area with her captor, as if she truly were a pet who needed to be kept close to her owner.

In truth, she was forced into the world of sex trafficking by her boyfriend, who was acting as her pimp. He chipped her to ensure her compliance, forcing her to sell her body for sex and then give him the money. This isn’t an unusual practice, either, as many industries, from prostitution to manufacturing to domestic service, will chip their “employees.” (source) Read more about RFID chips and their potential and current uses in our CE article here.

Already in use, RFID chips stand to become common technology. An American company called Applied Digital Solutions developed one the size of a grain of rice and it’s already been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration for distribution and implementation. You can read more about that in our CE article here.

[Read more here]

Robert O’Leary, JD BARA, has had an abiding interest in alternative health products & modalities since the early 1970’s & he has seen how they have made people go from lacking health to vibrant health. He became an attorney, singer-songwriter, martial artist & father along the way and brings that experience to his practice as a BioAcoustic Soundhealth Practitioner, under the tutelage of the award-winning founder of BioAcoustic Biology, Sharry Edwards, whose Institute of BioAcoustic Biology has now been serving clients for 30 years with a non-invasive & safe integrative modality that supports the body’s ability to self-heal using the power of the human voice. Robert brings this modality to serve clients in Greater Springfield (MA), and New England. He can also be reached at romayasoundhealthandbeauty@gmail.