Airline Brings Fresher Food to the Skies and a Garden to JFK Airport

Posted by on October 20, 2016 in Environment with 0 Comments

jetblue-terminal-garden-compressed

By Sarah McColl | EcoWatch

Much has been written about the JetBlue business class menu designed by Brad Farmerie, the executive chef of New York’s Saxon + Parole. “I’m in love!” one blogger gushed over the in-flight meals, which are a departure from the usual airline fare: a deviled egg with house-made sambal,bison meatloaf with blueberry quinoa or grilled avocado salad with salsa verde.

Even in coach and in the airport terminal, JetBlue brings more to the tray table than those (damn tasty) blue corn chips. There is, for example, a flourishing farm growing potatoes, kale, dill and oregano outside Terminal 5 at New York’s John F. Kennedy International Airport.

“Just because you booked an airline ticket doesn’t mean you have a deep love of concrete,” said Sophia Mendelsohn, JetBlue’s head of sustainability, referring to the formerly gray expanse of concrete the airline’s passengers used to look out at while sitting in Terminal 5—the area JetBlue “greenified” with the farm.

Her newest project operates under a similar ethos: “Just because you bought an airline ticket doesn’t mean you want to eat junk food,” she added. Or forget your social principles.

JetBlue is known for serving products from small, local New York food companies, such as Blue Marble Ice Cream and Brooklyn Roasting Company Coffee. Instead of hopefuls trying to get on board by cold calling the airline and sending samples, companies can apply to JetBlue’s BlueBud business-mentoring program. The airline shares lessons it has learned over 18 years in social responsibility, sustainability and marketing. The program also looks at the challenges of serving food at 30,000 feet. Cabin pressure, altitude and dry air zap about 30 percent of our tasting powers. Then there’s the tiny galley “kitchen.” Farmerie fights against palate atrophy with vinegars, spices and Maldon sea salt and against space constraints with dry ice and sous vide cooking. BlueBud asks food companies to consider how their recipes might need to be adapted or the packaging changed to work in-flight.


“We’ll walk you through how we look at food,” Mendelsohn said, adding that there are plans to expand the program.

Hot Bread Kitchen was the first BlueBud participant. The company’s bakers-in-training program helps prepare women for better-paying jobs in the culinary industry, while its retail arm sells breads from around the world, including nan-e qandi, heritage corn tortillas and naan. Hot Bread Kitchen’s challah is now served in JetBlue’s French toast.

At the end of the summer, Bronx Hot Sauce became the next small business invited into JetBlue’s culinary world and the partnership has the potential to lift up people tending community gardens in the Bronx.

John A. Crotty, a Bronx Hot Sauce founder, works as an affordable housing developer by day. Through his work in the Bronx and the conversations he has had with people there, Crotty was struck with the way they told “the Bronx story.”

READ THE REST OF THIS ARTICLE…

Tags: , , , ,

Subscribe

If you enjoyed this article, subscribe now to receive more just like it.

Subscribe via RSS Feed Connect on YouTube

New Title

NOTE: Email is optional. Do NOT enter it if you do NOT want it displayed.

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

FAIR USE NOTICE. Many of the articles on this site contain copyrighted material whose use has not been specifically authorized by the copyright owner. We are making this material available in an effort to advance the understanding of environmental issues, human rights, economic and political democracy, and issues of social justice. We believe this constitutes a 'fair use' of the copyrighted material as provided for in Section 107 of the US Copyright Law which contains a list of the various purposes for which the reproduction of a particular work may be considered fair, such as criticism, comment, news reporting, teaching, scholarship, and research. If you wish to use such copyrighted material for purposes of your own that go beyond 'fair use'...you must obtain permission from the copyright owner. And, if you are a copyright owner who wishes to have your content removed, let us know via the "Contact Us" link at the top of the site, and we will promptly remove it.

The information on this site is provided for educational and entertainment purposes only. It is not intended as a substitute for professional advice of any kind. Conscious Life News assumes no responsibility for the use or misuse of this material. Your use of this website indicates your agreement to these terms.

Paid advertising on Conscious Life News may not represent the views and opinions of this website and its contributors. No endorsement of products and services advertised is either expressed or implied.
Top

Send this to a friend