6 Ways to Identify Your Passion & Build a Career Around It

Written by on June 19, 2015 in Conscious Living, Happiness & Humor, Thrive with 0 Comments

Jeff Roberts | Collective Evolution

Image from www.collective-evolution.com.

Image from www.collective-evolution.com.

Life seems to have a plan for us even before we know it.

In fact, our paths are often so well laid out for us that before we know it, we’ve signed up for some sort of ambiguous university degree.

This happened to me. I chose to study dental hygiene because 1) it offered a good-looking salary and 2) the city I grew up in offered the program. Naturally, I did what was expected.

Thankfully though, I’m a quitter. With only one year left to finish, I decided to walk away from my career as an oral hygienist because 1) the stress of it was expediting my hair loss and 2) I was very unhappy.  So, I listened to my “intuition,” or common sense as some may call it, and left the program.

Eventually, I re-kindled my childhood love for writing to mitigate my shame for leaving school, never with the intention of building a career out of it, of course, because how many writers actually get paid for their work?


But somehow, after embracing my inner quitter and picking up an improbable hobby, I rolled two doubles and landed on free parking, or, in layman’s terms – I got hired as a writer.

Turning your passion into a lucrative career may seem impossible at times, and if your passion involves creativity it may seem just plain “stupid” to try and tackle, but there are methods to help make your dreams a reality that anyone can apply if you are finally ready and determined to make things happen in your life.

Let me elaborate.

1) Ask yourself what made you happiest when you were young and naive.

Portrait of boy wearing goggles and cape

Before you became jaded by life, i.e., car payments, rent, student loans, etc., what got you the most excited when you were a kid?

Perhaps it was using your easy-bake-oven to make mom mystery cakes (seriously, what the heck was in those?), reenacting scenes as Rose from Titanic in your friend’s swimming pool (No one? Just me then…), painting “nice” pictures for your art teacher, or pretending to ride a unicorn (in which case, stop reading this article because that will never happen). It doesn’t matter what that something is, the point is to think back to what got your inspirational juices going and made you happy. This means more than you realize.

If thinking about a childhood hobby sparks a light within you, even if that light is dim, hold on to it and think about ways of re-kindling that fire right now.

2) Think about the skills you love to use.

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A job can suck until you know what you are doing, but even then, is being good at making PowerPoint presentations or serving coffee really a skill that constitutes fulfillment? Maybe for some, but be honest with yourself.

Just because you’re good at something, doesn’t mean you should make a career out of it.

Ask yourself, “what skills or activities do I value the most in life?”

Instead of settling for less because you learned how to do something properly, think about skills within you that you thoroughly love to use. Then, think about how you can apply these skills to a career or hobby that you would actually enjoy.

3) What do you want to accomplish with your talents?

The goal: find out how or what you want to accomplish with your skills/talents. Are you a writer who wants to make people laugh? Are you a jeweler who would love nothing more than for your creations to make girls swoon? Are you a listener who simply wants to help others?

Whatever the case, be clear with your intention, then write it down so you see it every day. For example:

“I desire to find a fulfilling career as a baker/blogger, where my healthy but aesthetically pleasing recipes will make eating decisions easy for other home-makers.”

Then, start networking extensively to help you land a role that will give you the chance to support those causes and areas which most matter to you.

When you write your intentions down and see them in front of you, magic happens. If you don’t believe in whimsical life anecdotes like this, then fine, live your life without ever really trying “light-as-a-feather” with your friends after having just finished watching the cult classic The Craft, which, by the way they are re-making….

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