1,284 New Planets: Kepler Mission Announces Largest Collection Ever Discovered

Posted by on May 13, 2016 in Earth & Space, Sci-Tech with 5 Comments
Kepler Mission-compressed

This artist’s concept depicts select planetary discoveries made to date by NASA’s Kepler space telescope. Credit: NASA/W. Stenzel

Source: phys.org

NASA’s Kepler mission has verified 1,284 new planets – the single largest finding of planets to date.

“This announcement more than doubles the number of confirmed from Kepler,” said Ellen Stofan, chief scientist at NASA Headquarters in Washington. “This gives us hope that somewhere out there, around a star much like ours, we can eventually discover another Earth.”

Analysis was performed on the Kepler space telescope’s July 2015 planet candidate catalog, which identified 4,302 potential planets. For 1,284 of the candidates, the probability of being a planet is greater than 99 percent – the minimum required to earn the status of “planet.” An additional 1,327 candidates are more likely than not to be actual planets, but they do not meet the 99 percent threshold and will require additional study. The remaining 707 are more likely to be some other astrophysical phenomena. This analysis also validated 984 candidates previously verified by other techniques.

“Before the Kepler space telescope launched, we did not know whether exoplanets were rare or common in the galaxy. Thanks to Kepler and the research community, we now know there could be more planets than stars,” said Paul Hertz, Astrophysics Division director at NASA Headquarters. “This knowledge informs the future missions that are needed to take us ever-closer to finding out whether we are alone in the universe.”

Kepler captures the discrete signals of distant planets – decreases in brightness that occur when planets pass in front of, or transit, their stars – much like the May 9 Mercury transit of our sun. Since the discovery of the first planets outside our solar system more than two decades ago, researchers have resorted to a laborious, one-by-one process of verifying suspected planets.


This latest announcement, however, is based on a statistical analysis method that can be applied to many planet candidates simultaneously. Timothy Morton, associate research scholar at Princeton University in New Jersey and lead author of the scientific paper published in The Astrophysical Journal, employed a technique to assign each Kepler candidate a planet-hood probability percentage – the first such automated computation on this scale, as previous statistical techniques focused only on sub-groups within the greater list of planet candidates identified by Kepler.

“Planet candidates can be thought of like bread crumbs,” said Morton. “If you drop a few large crumbs on the floor, you can pick them up one by one. But, if you spill a whole bag of tiny crumbs, you’re going to need a broom. This statistical analysis is our broom.”

In the newly-validated batch of planets, nearly 550 could be like Earth, based on their size. Nine of these orbit in their sun’s habitable zone, which is the distance from a star where orbiting planets can have surface temperatures that allow liquid water to pool. With the addition of these nine, 21 exoplanets now are known to be members of this exclusive group.

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  1. 10208827466499729@facebook.com' Dom Vaughn says:

    How exciting !!!!

  2. 1000703136673979@facebook.com' Manape Raphahlela says:

    What Are Stars Excatly Find Them Reali Interesting. I Be Lookin At Them Like Mins Ago

  3. 1617545018566751@facebook.com' Atilla Yılmaz says:

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    الساده الافاضل محبى القراءة والاضطلاع مابين مقالات وآراء وأدب روائى نتشرف بزيارت� I like: “Before the Kepler space telescope launched, we did not know whether exoplanets were rare or commoNews, Articles, and Information for Conscious Living on Planet Earth

  4. 1636896506568673@facebook.com' Corinne Omeasoo says:

    I agree there are more planets than stars.

  5. 1734193636795914@facebook.com' Ethan Miller says:

    Errrr duuuhhhhhh. Isn’t that common sense? Stars attract debree creating solar systems full of planets…. Look at our own. We’re not that special….. Jeeeeeezzzzzzuhhhhhh! Typical humanzzzz…. Sad thing is I’m being honest…

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