7 Books That Will Change the Way You See the World

Posted by on February 14, 2017 in Books, Media & Arts with 9 Comments

Gary ‘Z’ McGee | Waking Times

Books

“You want weapons? Go to a library. Books are the best weapons in the world.” –Doctor Who

Books have a way of capturing us that movies and documentaries simply cannot compare to. The worst thing you can do is limit yourself to reading only a few books. The best thing you can do is find out what you’re interested in and get out there and read up on the subject. You’ll find that your interests will grow along with your knowledge, to the point that you’ll discover the deliciously heavy weight of knowing that you know nothing. If you’re looking for books that will challenge you mind body and soul, and cause you to see the world in new ways, look no further than the following seven books (just kidding, look further).


1.) Thus Spoke Zarathustra by Friedrich Nietzsche

“With this book I have given mankind the greatest present that has ever been made to it so far. This book, with a voice bridging centuries, is not only the highest book there is, the book that is truly characterized by the air of the heights—the whole fact of man lies beneath it at a tremendous distance—it is also the deepest, born out of the innermost wealth of truth, an inexhaustible well to which no pail descends without coming up again filled with gold and goodness.”Friedrich Nietzsche

Thus Spoke Zarathustra has something terribly well-crafted about it, and indeed – sit venia verbo – it is Nietzsche’s magnum opus. The books single task and raison d’etre consists in turning the human soul inside out. And it succeeds, but only if the reader is open enough to receive it. It has everything from the death of God to the overcoming of man through the prophecy of the  Übermensch to the “eternal recurrence of the same.” It possesses a unique experimental style, sang in “dithyrambs” narrated by Zarathustra. It is neither prose nor poetry but it is both somehow, breaking all literary rules but coming out smelling like a rose someone laid on God’s own grave. Nietzsche’s elegant and far-reaching conclusion is that while autonomy and self-overcoming are not easily attained, their absence proves catastrophic to both the individual and culture, as the embittered conformists seek new victims on whom to psychologically pillage with their ideals and avenge their psychic wounds born out of the fear of being an insecure being in an unforgiving universe.

2.) The Denial of Death by Ernest Becker

“Danger: real probability of the awakening of terror and dread, from which there will be no turning back.”Ernest Becker

Awarded the Pulitzer Prize for Non-Fiction in 1974, The Denial of Death builds on the works of Søren Kierkegaard, Sigmund Freud, and Otto Rank. Throughout the book Becker’s voice is a chokehold of higher reason. He grabs us by the throat and brings us back down to earth, where he reveals how we are nothing more than insecure, fallible creatures “who need continued affirmation of our powers.” But it is through this continued affirmation where we discover our “symbolic self,” which we use to transcend the limits of our insignificance. This leads to our embarking on an “immortality project,” in which we become part of something we feel will last forever, beyond death. It is at this point that we transcend the dilemma of mortality through heroism. Becker speaks like his own tongue was a hero of a thousand faces itself, lashing like existential whips at the heart of the human condition. He forces our head over the edge of the abyss, challenging us to be heroically creative and responsible with bringing meaning, purpose, and significance to the grand scheme of our lives.

3.) Nature and the Human Soul by Bill Plotkin

“Remember that self-doubt is as self-centered as self-inflation. Your obligation is to reach as deeply as you can and offer your unique and authentic gifts as bravely and beautifully as you’re able.”Bill Plotkin

In this book Bill Plotkin introduces The Eight Soul-centric/Eco-centric Stages of Human Development. He takes us on an epic journey of healthy human development, beginning with The Innocent in the Nest, The Explorer in the Garden, and The Thespian at the Oasis. These three stages round out the lower ego-centered stages of human development. The majority of people in Western societies never get beyond this stage, and so true adulthood, or psychological maturity, has become an uncommon achievement, and genuine elder-hood nearly nonexistent. Arguably the most critical stage is the fourth: The Wanderer in the Cocoon, where we learn how to stretch comfort zones, break mental paradigms, and pass through existential thresholds. Our ego is fully formed, and we become a creature that has the capacity for “soul initiation.” The stages continue with The Soul Apprentice at the Wellspring, The Artisan in the Wild Orchard, The Master in the Grove of Elders, and end with The Sage in the Mountain Cave.

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  1. 1754776034755164@facebook.com' Công Chúa Bong Bóng says:

    Hello everyone, Conscious Life News…My IQ score of 125, and u?…
    CqgqDVF ? start now. ~~> http://goo.gl/25hFoh

    good article of page: Books have a way of capturing us that movies and documentaries simply cannot compare to. The worst thing you can do is limit yourself to reading only …

  2. 1220749037953041@facebook.com' Arihant Chauhan says:

    Harshit Chauhan

  3. 316663911831374@facebook.com' Mind and Body says:

    10 Benefits of Reading: Why You Should Read Every Day
    1. Mental Stimulation
    2. Stress Reduction
    3. Knowledge
    4. Vocabulary Expansion
    5. Memory Improvement
    6. Stronger Analytical Thinking Skills
    7. Improved Focus and Concentration
    8. Better Writing Skills
    9. Tranquility
    10. Free Entertainment

  4. 968883156498603@facebook.com' Nnenna Nwabueze Obi-ogwuilu says:

    Yes

  5. 10153255090837172@facebook.com' Taryn Berzerkery says:

    Mac Steven

  6. 10207905786821985@facebook.com' Monty Rizzo says:

    Be sure to reference The Communist Manifesto by Karl Marx because that shit is like, dope, yo. Struggle.

  7. 1143555989012404@facebook.com' Janet Tabor says:

    So very true.

  8. 10205640098627842@facebook.com' Letesha Case says:

    The giver

  9. 197755143917227@facebook.com' Sarah Jones says:

    Never trust anyone who only has one book!!!!

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